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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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January 15, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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January 15, 2014
 

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10!1 Wednesday, Jan. 15, 2014 uulletm, Iecoro, erogresstve, teporcer Z)n fishing for others, hunting during the rut, and more CALIFORNIA OUTDOORS CARRIE WILSON California Dept. of Fish & Wildlife CaIOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov return, that would be illegal. Anglers who lawfully catch fish may always give fish away to whomever they wish, but it is not legal for nonanglers to pay for another person's trip with the understanding or expectation of receiving fish in return for that money. Hunting during the rut Question: While watching hunting shows on TV, I see that most of them are hunting during the rut. Why can't deer and elk hunters in California also hunt during the rut? --Terry C. Answer: It's all about providing more hunting opportunities to more people. According to Game Species Conservation Program Manager Craig Stowers, seasons are set with certain harvest objectives in mind. Later in the season as the animals go into the rut (breeding period) they become more bold in their attempts to fmd a mate, and are thus easier to hunt. If the season was held during the rut, the hunter harvest success rate would be higher, and fewer hunters would be able to hunt before the harvest objectives were reached. Hunter survey data show most hunters simply want an opportunity to hunt. The archery and gun seasons begin in different zones around the state in July and August, respectively. By starting the season early and allowing it to run until late fall when the animals are just going into the rut, more hunters have more opportunities to participate. In addition to regular season hunts, there are also several special late-season hunts offered that are timed to take place during the rut. These are highly sought-after tags, though, and they are distributed only through the big-game drawing. Most of California's deer hunting takes place well before the rut begins (general seasons are timed to close about a month before the rut gets started) for two reasons: 1) Hunting during the rut greatly reduces hunter opportunity (hunting success Sending a friend to fish Question: what if four people got together and all paid the boat fare so that one person in the group could take a long-range fishing trip? Three of the people are not anglers. After the trip, all of the fish caught by the one angler would then be split evenly between the four people. Would this be all right or somehow considered selling of fish? --Doug S. Montebello Answer: Fish caught under the authority of a sport fishing license may not be bought, sold, traded or bartered (Fish and Game Code, Section 7121). This means if these people all helped pay the fare for another person to take a fishing trip with the expectation of receiving some of the fish caught back in Events Around Plumas County Quincy: After-School Kids Club, 3 - 5 p.m., Plumas County Library community meeting room at 445 Jackson St. Activities lnclude arts and crafts, science activities, games, stories, snacks, more. Open to kids in second - sixth grade; younger kids may attend with adult. Free; continues weekly through school year. For information: 283-6310. r chester: Flu vaccination clinic, 10 a.m. - noon, Almanor Basin Community Resource Center at 372 Main St. For mation, appointments: Plumas County Public Health Agency, 283-6330. Almanor Community Supper, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m., Chester Memorial Hall. Twice-monthly event hosted by different club, organization November through April. Free; donations appreciated. For information, to volunteer: Lisa and Craig Phillips, 714-801-2543. Quincy: Labor law update workshop, 9 - 11 a.m., Business & Career Network at 270 County Hospital Road Suite 206. Costs $39; preregistration required. All mandatory posters, pamphlets available for order. For more information, to register: http:llbit.lyllgSBHhK. Flu vaccination clinic, 2 - 4 p.m., 270 County Hospital Road. Walk-in clinic; no appointment needed. For information, appointments (not required): Plumas County Public Health Agency, 283-6330. Graeagle: 'r I Live music at The Grille, .= 'a,t  5:30 - 9 p.m., Chalet Jail | i  View Lodge. Featuring  Kelly Ann Miller, guffansguita i t and vocalist. Dinner menu available. For information, reservations (recommended): Bob Hickman, 832-5528, mthomseme@yahoo.com. Contra dance, 7:30 p.m., Feather River Grange. Begins with introduction; style is easy, family-friendly. All dances taught and called; no partner required. Features live music by Amazing Musical Mavens. $7 adults, $5 students with ID, free for under 16. For information: Leslie Mink, 616-1892, leslielnink@gmail.com. Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, meet 1 p.m. outside Loomis Ranger Station on plaza in ita Lake area. Weather permitting. 1- to 2-mile adventure explores winter ecology, Lassen's geologic history. Dress in layers, carry food, drinking water. Limited number of snowshoes available for $1 donation. .  Quincy: Free employment workshop, 10 a.m. - |lklle I noon, Business and Jail -  Career Network at 270 -- • County Hospital Road : Suite 107. Topic: interview skills. For information: 283-1606. Quincy: Plumas CASA Program Orientation, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m., 591 Main St. Court-appointed special advocates are specially trained volunteers appointed by judge to advocate for abused, neglected, abandoned children. For information: 283-2227, 283-5515. Portola: Flu vaccination clinic, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m., Public Health Clinic at 171 Nevada St. For information, appointments: Plumas County Public Health Agency, 283-6330. Quincy: Winter Wildlands Backcountry Film Festival selections; doors open 6:15, show at 7 p.m.; Town Hall Theatre. Presented by Feather River College Outdoor Recreation Leadership program as fundraiser, with support from Plumas Arts, FRC Foundation. Tickets $8 per adult, $3 per student; libations and treats available in theatre lobby. Drawing for handcrafted skis. Graeagle: Live music at The Grille, 5:30 - 9 p.m., Chalet View Lodge. Featuring Karl Larson, guitarist and vocalist. Dinner menu available. For information, reservations (recommended): Bob Hickman, 832-5528, mthomseme@yahoo.com. Greenville: Inaugural "Around the Kitchen Table, 10 a.m. - noon, Lupines Natural Foods. First community discussion event to te topic ideas, share stories and food. Bring favorite mug for hot beverages• Seating limited• For information, to reserve 284-6959. Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, meet 1 p.m. outside Loomis Ranger Station on plaza in Manzanita Lake area. Weather permitting. 1- to 2-mile adventure "explores winter ecology, Lassen's geologic history. Dress in layers, carry food, drinking water. Limited number of snowshoes available for $1 donation. . ^  Chester: 'Fish fry, 5:30 - 7 p.m., Lake Almanor Elks Lodge I rill / at 194 Main St. $8 per / jail , j person• Graeagle: Live music at TheGrille, 5:30 - 9 p.m., Chalet View Lodge. Featuring Andrew Ohren, 'guitarist. Dinner menu available• For information, reservations (recommended): Bob Hickman, 832-5528, mthomseme@yahoo.com. Chester: Enchilada pickup, 10 a.m. - 1 p.m., Cheste r Memorial Hall. Presented by Feather River Blue Star Morns. Preordered enchiladas $i 0 for six, proceeds benefit Homes for Our Veterans group. Fundraising bake sale also available. To order, for information: Ann Cordero, 596-4785. Lake Davis: Annual Ice Fishing Tournament, check in 7 - 9 a.m. at J&J Grizzly Stbre and Camping Resort. Fishing begins 8 a.m., weigh-in ends 3 p.m. John Pato Sr. presents fundraiser for nonprofit American Cancer Society. Entry fee $20. Registration forms available at 420incfishing.com, KS Market in Portola, Mill Works in Graeagle, J&J Grizzly Store at Lake Davis. Giveaway drawing prizes; trophies, cash prizes for first - third place. Dress warmly. Quincy: Second annual Groundhog Fever Fest, in front of courthouse. Presented by Quincy Revival Committee. Chili cook-off offers prizes for people's choice, judges' choice; $30 to enter. Children's area, vendor booths, mustache (and faux-stache) contest. For information: groundhogfeverfest.com; James Wilson, 510-230-9442. Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, meet 1 p.m. outside Loomis Ranger Station on plaza in nzanita Lake area. Weather permitting. 1 - to 2-mile adventure explores winter ecology, Lassen's geologic history. Dress in layers, carry food, drinking water. Limited number of snowshoes available for $1 donation. c Greenville: Flu vaccination clinic, 10 a.m. - noon, Public Health Clinic at 120 Bidwell. For information, appointments: Plumas Health Agency, 283-6330. Clio: Trailfest, 5 p.m., Nakoma Golf Resort. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship fundraiser with Casino Royale theme. Presale tickets $40, available at sierratrails.org; tickets $45 at the door. Includes dinner, libations, silent and live auction, fundraising casino play, project updates. Formal attire encouraged. Lake Almanor: Peninsula Firemen's Association Annual Crab Feed, Station No. 2 at 801 Golf Club Road. 5 p.m. social, 6 p.m. dinner. Menu: crab, salad, bread, dessert, coffee; no-host bar available. Tickets, $35, available at Station No. 2, Rouland Insurance at 650 Main St. in Chester. Proceeds enable fire district to purchase, repair fire, medical equipment. For information: Holly, 259-2306. 1 Quincy: Waffle breakfast, 8 - 11 a.m., Feather River Grange 440 at 55 Main St. Waffles, scrambled eggs, bacon or sausage, beverage for $6. All proceeds support Grange efforts to restore building as community meeting center. rate is higher and so fewer tags can be issued to achieve the harvest objectives). 2) To create the least amount of disturbance possible during this critical phase of their lifecycle. The bottom line is deer managers try to strike a balance between providing hunter opportunity and success while not exceeding harvest objectives. Photo ID required Question: While hunting or fishing, besides carrying the appropriate license(s), do I also need to have photo identification in possession or can I leave it in my vehicle? --Gino A: Answer: You will need to verify you are the person holding your own fishing or hunting license. Though photo identification is not mandated by law, being able to identify yourself properly is. If you cannot ippropriately identify who you are, you may see yourself in an extended contact with the game warden. If you're getting cited for something, the game warden may have to take you to jail until you can be properly identified. The bottom line is even though the law doesn't state you must have photo identification in possession, it would benefit you greatly to carry photo identification, so you may properly identify who you are to the game warden. Catching lobsters and crabs Question: Is it legal to fish for both lobsters and crabs at the same time using hoop nets for the lobster and a crab pot for the crabs? My concern is that when we return to harbor, a game warden may question which method was used to take which species. The crab pot is a Northern California type that is "soaked" for days and has escape ports. The hoop net is a basic hoop net. --J˘/S. Answer: You may fish for lobsters and crabs at the same time but only with hoop nets or by hand. Crab traps are legal to use in the north but are illegal for sport fishermen to use south of Point Arguello (California Code of Regulations Title 14, Section 29.80(e)). While most lobsters occur in SoUthern California below Point Arguello, for any that do occur north of this point, crab traps may not be used. Carrie Wilson is a marine environmental scientist with the California Department ofFish and Wildlife. While she cannot personally answer everyone's questions, she will select a few to answer each weak in this column. Contact her at CalOutdoors@wildlife.ca.gov. Free tax assistance offered The Loyalton Senior Center is now taking appointments for the AARP Tax-Aide program. This service offers free help with the preparation of 2012 federal and state income tax returns and is available to people of all ages with middle and low income, with special attention to those 60 and older. The program is staffed by volunteers who are IRS-trained and certified. Appointments are available Thursday, Feb. 20, and Thursday, March 20, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Those interested in free tax filing assistance must call Loyalton Senior Center at 993-4770 for an appointment, directions and details on what to bring. This is the only AARP Tax-Aide site in Sierra and Plumas counties. .. 7' '! ':;HL ! . | Monday, Jan. 20 | Sites Closed for Martin Luther King Day. I Tuesday, Jan. 21 |Apple juice, beef stew, carrots, potatoes, whole | grain roll, minted pears. | Wednesday, Jan. 22 Thursday, Jan. 23 Swiss steak, mashed potatoes, |. steamed spinach, whole |. wheat bread, chilled • apricots. | Friday, Jan. 24 | Turkey enchiladas, spanish rice, tossed green salad, | citrus cup, flan (caramel Healthy heart: baked chicken, pudding). I Nutrition sites: Chester, 394-7636; Quincy, 283-0643;| | Greenville, 284-6608 (day before for reservation); Portola, 832- - 4173; Blairsden open Wed. only, call 832-4173 Tuesday for | reservations. Suggested donation $2.50 for 60 yrs & older. • | One guest may accompany each senior, $6 mandatory| charge. Menus may change. Hours: Noon at all sites. L == --..-- m == --. --..-- m .-- m == dl Our community benefits from it/ t