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Quincy, California
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January 21, 2015     Feather River Bulletin
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Ruling favors suction dredge miners -- Page 3A Charter school restructures program-- Page 5A ;2 1 7 i,,Lr.i? ii;-F ........ " ,.,,=L l Q', U Vol. 148, No. 24 www.plumasnews.com 530-283-0800 Wednesaay, Jan. 21, 2015 A Plumas man set a It ain't easy being green Today: "Jungles: People of the Trees," 5 p.m., Science 104 at Feather River College. FRC Sustainability Action Team presents episode of BBC series "Human Planet" as part of spring Environmental Film Series. Free, open to the public; beverages, popcorn provided. For information: Dr. Darla DeRuiter, 283-0202, ext. 262, dderuiter@frc.edu. Tomorrow: Agriculture workshop, noon, Plumas Coudty Library conference room. Facilitated by county Farm Advisor Holly George. For information: George, hageorge@ucanr.edu. Saturday: Waffle breakfast, 8- 10 a.m., Grange Hall. $6. For information: 927-8879. Celebratinff 100 Years of Music, 7 - 9 p.m., Quincy Elks Lodge in East Quincy. Senior project by Breeann Taylor-Mays features live music by Quincy High School jazz band, other performers supporting QHS music program. Food, no-host bar, dancing. Adults $10, students $7, kids 12 and under free. Tickets available at Quincy Natural Foods, Carey Candy Co. See Q, page 4A ..................... ~ .......... 1]!!I!!!!!1 I To subscribe:' to the' Bulletin,,"" .... , b " call 530-283-0800 I Members of the community and Feather River College's Student Environmental Association show their true colors -- green and yellow -- during a demonstration in support of the endangered Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog at Dame Shirley Plaza in celebration of Martin Luther King Jr. Day on Monday. In addition to dressi-ng as frogs and holding bold signs, demonstrators joined in song, Singing the famous Kermit the Frog ballad "ltAin't Easy Being Green." Photo by James-Wi|son un Debra Moore Staff Writer dmoore@plumasnews.com "I can stay here forever and ever and ever ... right?" asks the little boy. "You can stay here as long as you need me)' the woman responds. The woman is Lucie Kreth. She and her husband, Steve, are foster parents who are licensed to care for six children in their Mohawk Vista home. They have already raised 11 of their own; the youngest is now 21. Lucie is also the director of "They're children. If I can give them six months or 12 months of love, hope, kindness or peace ... if I can give them food ... You have to follow your heart; I have to do what I can." Lucie Kreth Foster Parent Portola Kids, a nonprofit preschool. She knows kids. Over the past six years, Lucie and Steve have cared for 18 foster children, ranging in age from a newborn who arrived straight from the hospital to a 16-year-old. Most have been toddlers or elementary school students. "Sometimes they arrive in just a diaper," Lucie said. That's because most foster children are removed from the home in an emergency situation. "Most removals are because of an arrest," said Leslie Mohawk, a program manager at the county's social services department. Often that means trying to find a home for children in the middle of the night. "We need to find them somewhere safe with nice people," Mohawk said. See Fosters, page 4A " ials irec in ga ions Debra Moore Staff Writer "1 don't want to run dmoore@plumasnews.com a homegrown guy There are about two years i lout of doing to go on the current solid business here." waste contracts, but county officials and the garbage franchise holders are anxious to finish negotiating new ones. " Public Works Director Bob Perreault has been leading the discussions and appeared before the Board of Supervisors to ask for direction, but he found more than he was looking for during the Jan. 13 meeting. "I feel these contracts need to be put out to bid," said Supervisor Sherrie Thrall. She explained that is why she wanted to terminate the "evergreen clause" in the contract, which caused it to perpetually renew in five-year increments. Supervisor Lori Simpson didn't agree and said that the board had promised the franchise holders that killing the evergreen clause when they did three years Lori Simpson District 4 Supervisor Plumas County ago wouldn't result in a bid process. "They were upset ... worried about their future ... worried about their investments," Simpson said of the franchise operators. She said that she remembered the discussion. clearly and added, "I'm not going back on my word." While Feather River Disposal, which serves Quincy, Greenville andthe Almanor area, is now owned and operated by Waste Management, IhterMountain Disposal, which handles garbage See Contracts, page 4A Where in the world? In the comfort of her Falls Church, Virginia, home, Molly York devours the news of her grandparents Steve and Eva Small's hometown newspaper. liege lies Ior' ree James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.corn During his report during the Jan. 15 Feather River College board of trustees meeting, President Kevin Trutna informed the board that the college submitted an application to offer a bachelor's degree program. FRC hopes to be one of 15 community colleges in California to offer four-year programs. Currently, no community college in California can offer bachelor's degrees, but an assembly bill passed in 2014 aims to change that, Gov. Jerry Brown signed off on AB 850 Sept. 29, 2014, passing into law a pilot program that will allow 15 community colleges to offer technical bachelor's degrees in a limited capacity to supply trained workers in growing industries. Courses cannot be duplicated with any in the University of California or the California State University systems, and they have to be technical in nature. Trutna told the board that FRC has a good chance of selection, though 71 other community college districts are competing against the small Plumas college. See FRC, page 5A i !