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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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January 28, 2015     Feather River Bulletin
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January 28, 2015
 

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Association honors Quincy fire chief- Page 2A Supervisors hear tourism marketing pitch -- Page 3A Vol 148, No 25 wwwlplumasnewscom 5302830800 Wednesday, Jan 28 2015 50 Today: Event Workshop, 1 - 4 p.m., Mineral Building at Plumas-Sierra County Fairgrounds. Fair manager John Steffanic presents free workshop on planning events. Includes free workbook (while supplies last), For reservations: 283-6272, johnsteffanic@county ofplumas.com. Tomorrow: Fourth annual Backcountry Ski Film Festival; doors open 6 p.m., presentation 7; Town Hall Theatre. Fundraiser for Feather River College Outdoor Recreation Leadership program presented by Winter Wildlands Alliance. Ten short films, prize giveaway, refreshments. Admission $8, students $4; "additional donations welcome. Saturday: John Craigie in concert, 7:30 p.m., West End Theatre. Singer, songwriter, storyteller performed at High Sierra Music Festival. Tickets $10 in advance, $12 at the door; available at Carey Candy Co., Epilog Books, westendtheatre.us. Live music, 9:30 p.m., Main Street Sports Bar and Lounge at 395 Main St. Featuring classic rock by Parslow Vibe. For information: 283-9788. .It!l.!l!lll!!!!!ll, To subscribe to the Bulletin, call 530-283-0800 Nursing home slated for closure 00Aove would displace dozens of patients and cost 60 jobs Debra Moore Staff Writer dmoore@plumasnews.com Local health care leaders learned last week that the skilled nursing hospital in Quincy is slated for closure, which would result in the relocation of more than "There is an urgent need three dozen patients and the for a cooperative effort in loss of 60 jobs. our community to save our "There is an urgent need for a cooperative effort in our community to save our nursing home." Dr, Ross Morgan Medical Director, Country Villa nursing home," said Dr. Ross Morgan, the facility's medical director. Denise Huggins, the manager of Country Villa, received notification Jan. 14 that the nursing home's parent company planned to close the facility due to financial losses. She was instructed to file a +closure plan with the state. The California Department of Public Health must respond within 10 days to determine whether or not the plan is adequate. Public Health Director Mimi Hall said she began researching the situation when she learned of it late last week and was told by a nursing home advocacy group that the state has certified all closure plans in See Closure, page 9A Feather River College, Plumas County's establishment of higher learning, will soon have more prestige added to its reputation. The California Chancellor's Office announced last week FRC will be one of 15 community colleges in the state to offer a bachelor's degree program. Photo by JamesWilson FRC to offer bachelor's degree 'James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Feather River College will soon be more than a steppingstone on the path to a four-year degree. It'll be the final destination. The California Chancellor's Office announced Jan. 20 that it approved 15 community colleges to offer four-year degrees, and FRC was on the list. "We are thrilled to hive this opportunity for our students and the school," said FRC Dean of Instruction Derek Lerch. "There is a long list of "We are thrilled to have this opportunity for our students and the school." Derek Lerch Dean of Instruction Feather River College unresolved details that we'll work quickly to address in the coming months." Last year, Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation to allow up to 15 community colleges to establish bachllor degree programs to supply workers in growing industries. FRC submitted its application in December to offer a degree in equine industry. Along with the application, the college sent letters of support from Cal Poly Pomona, Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, Fresno State, Chico State and UC Davis. Last Tuesday, the college found out its application was selected in a highly competitive review process. FRC's proposal, along with 14 others, was selected from 34 applications. "These colleges are embarking on a new mission for the California colleges that will expand opportunities in public higher education," California Community Colleges Chancellor Brice W. Harris said in his Jan. 20 press release. "Students will have a range of programs from which to choose to earn high-quality, affordable and in-demand degrees." The Chancellor's Office explained that the selected programs were chosen based on a number of See Degree, page 4A Judge sacks drug program Kaufman says clients aren't getting the needed services Dan McDonald Managing Editor dmcdonald@plumasnews.com Relations between the Plumas County Mental Health Department and county's criminal leaders suffered anoer setback last week. + Superior Court Judge Kaufman announced Wednesday, Jan. 21, that he was no longersentencing people to drug court. He said he was ending the program because clients weren't being served. "The court is done playing the game," Kaufman said during an executive meeting of the county's criminal justice leaders. "The court is tired of what's going on,, the judge said. "This is just not working .... We are not providing citizens the appropriate services that they need .... People are being set up for failure. I See Drug, page 4A Supervisors want residents to weigh in on Jefferson Debra Moore Staff Writer dmoore@plumasnews,com Proponents of the state of Jefferson pushed the Plumas County Board of Supervisors to sign a declaration of support Jan. 20, but they didn't get it -- partly because the supervisors had not seen the declaration yet and partly because they want input from their constituents. The title of the declaration reads: "Declaration and Petition to the California State Legislature for the Withdrawal of Plumas County from the State of , California and to Form the State of Jefferson." After the supervisors listened to arguments for and against forming the state of Jefferson, one by one they voiced their preference to gain more information and to hear from the people of Plumas County. "I'm 100 percent behind what the state of Jefferson stands for and what it means Siskiyou County businessman Mark Baird presents information about the state of Jefferson to the Plumas County Board of Supervisors and a standing-room-only crowd Jan. 20, The supervisors want more information and want input from their constituents on whether or not to proceed with the next step in the formation of a new state. Photo by Debra Moore to our county," Board ChaSrman Kevin Goss said, but he wanted input from the boards of education and the hospital boards. Supervisor Lori Simpson said she agreed with Goss about representation, but, as she stated back in October, "it needs to be voted on by the people in the county." She added that both Butte and Shasta counties asked for more details and that since she is the fiduciary for the county, she feels that same responsibility. She concluded her remarks with "Let the , people of Plumas County decide," "I echo what Lori has to say," said Supervisor Sherrie Thrall. "I absolutely believe in 'We the people...'" "I'm very much in support of the state of Jefferson," Supervisor Terry Swofford said. "But I agree with Sherrie (Thrall): it's important to hear from the people." "I liked the name you picked out," said Supervisor Jeff Engel in an attempt to lighten the mood in the room. He said he was "sympathetic to the need for more representation" and, as a businessman, "I'm always looking over my shoulder" because of state regulations. He agreed that his constituents should vote on the matter. However, to "hear from the people" won't come cheap. During an interview the following day, County Clerk Kathy Williams estimated that a countywide special election would cost approximately $60,000. The last time the county held such an election was in 2011 to vote for a successor for state Sen. Dave Cox, who See Jefferson, page SA i