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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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February 1, 2012     Feather River Bulletin
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February 1, 2012
 

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4B Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter LAW and ()].<DER SHERIFF'S BLOTTER Arrests Chester One person was arrested on a charge of being under the influence of a controlled substance. Portola One person was arrested on a charge of resisting arrest. Quincy Two people were arrested on charges of public intoxica- tion. Fire Saturday, Jan. 21 Flue: In Chester, a caller reported a possible flue fire. The call was transferred to Susanville Interagency Fire Center. The information was transferred to a deputy. Medical Thursday, Jan. 19 Airway: At Lake Almanor, a caller requested an ambu- lance for her neighbor who was having difficulty breath- ing. The call was transferred t(rSIFC. Pain: In Portola, a caller re- ported being in pain following surgery. The call was trans- ferred to Eastern Plumas Health Care. Portola fire was paged and responded. Friday, Jan. 20 Assistance: In Greenville, a caller who was in a wheel- chair called for assistance. She said she was having trouble with her electric bed that was unplugged. Pain: In Greenville, a caller requested an ambulance for his mother who was having back pain. The information was transferred to South Lassen EMS. Indian Valley fire was paged. Unknown malady: In Portola, a caller requested an ambu- lance for her mother who was very ill. The call was trans- ferred to EPHC. Portola fire was paged and responded. The patient was transported to EPHC. Saturday, Jan. 21 Unknown malady: In Chester, a caller requested an ambu- lance for a male who was very ill. The call was transferred to SIFC. The information was transferred to a deputy. Fall: In Portola, a caller reported a man fell in the shower. The call was trans- ferred to EPHC. Portola fire was paged. Eye: In Quincy, a caller re- quested medical attention be- cause of a contact lens that was attached to his eye. He said he could not remove it and was in a lot of pain. The call was transferred to Plumas District Hospital. PDH and Quincy fire were paged, Sunday, Jan. 22 Unknown malady: In Quincy, a caller reported that he was feeling weak because he had not eaten in a week. The call was transferred to PDH. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Airway: In Meadow Valley, a caller reported he could not breathe. The call was trans- ferred to PDH. PDH and Meadow Valley fire were paged. Airway: In Greenville, a caller requested an ambu- lance for her 2-month-old daughter who had choked earlier and was having trouble breathing. The call was transferred to SLEMS. Indian Valley fire was paged. Airway: In Chester, a caller requested an ambulance due to difficulty breahing. The call was transferred to SIFC. Monday, Jan. 23 Cancer: In Graeagle, a caller advised her husband has cancer and had not been able to use his legs for two days. She said she could not get him to the hospital by her- self. The call was transferred to EPHC. Graeagle fire was paged. Unknown malady: In Portola, a caller requested an ambu- lance for unknown reasons. The call was transferred to EPHC. Portola fire was paged. Fall: In Quincy, a caller reported an elderly man had fallen and" could not get up. The call was transferred to PDH. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Cardiac: In Greenville, a caller reported suffering a possible heart attack. The call was transferred to SLEMS. Greenville fire was paged. Tuesday, Jan. 24 Fall: In Quincy, a caller requested an ambulance because she had fallen and could not get up. The call was transferred to PDH. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Complications: In Quincy, a caller requested an ambu- lance because of post-opera- tion complications. PDH and Quincy fire were paged. Unknown malady: In Green- ville, a caller requested the fire department be paged to assist an ill female. Indian Valley fire was paged. Fall: In Portola, a 70-year-old woman was admitted to the medical clinic after injuring her head in a fall. The infor- mation was transferred to EPHC. Portola fire was paged. Weakness: In Greenville, a caller requested an ambu- lance for a female who had just been released from the hospital and was experienc- ing general weakness. Indian Valley fire was paged. The i nformation was transferred to a deputy. Forest Service releases final EIS for planning rule nearly 300,000 comments received on the proposed rule and draft environmental impact statement issued last February, to develop the agency's preferred course of action for finalizing the planning rule. This is in- cluded in the PEIS released as USDA's preferred alternative. A notice of availability for the PEIS will be published in the Federal Register Feb. 3, and the secretary will issue a record of decision selecting a final planning rule no less than 30 days afterward. "The most collaborative rulemaking effort in agency history has resulted in a strong framework to restore and manage our forests and watersheds and help deliver countless benefits to the Amer- icana peoRl/' si,d y!lsack. '"OUr prefeXr.ed alternative will safeguard our natural resources 'and provide a roadmap for getting work done on the ground that will restore our forests while providing job opportunities for local communities." The preferred alternative emphasizes collaboration and strengthens the role of public involvement and dialogue throughout the planning process. It also would require the use of the best available scientific information to inform decisions. Highlights of the preferred alternative include: --Plans must include com- ponents that seek to restore and maintain forests and grasslands. --Plans would include requirements to maintain or restore watersheds, .water resources, water  quality By releasing online a Final Programmatic Environmen- tal Impact Statement (PEIS) for the National Forest System Land Management Planning Rule, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack signaled the U.S. Department of Agriculture's intent to issue a new planning rule for America's 193-million-acre national forest system. The new rule seeks to de- liver stronger protections for forests, water and wild- life while supporting the economic vitality of rural communities. This recent ac- tion honors the commitment made by Vilsack in his 2009 speech on forest management, and by the president in the America's Great Outdoors Repqrt. USD .anu,.the Foresr- ,wee. Careiuy ciltdered SHEAR PLEASURE DAY SPA 2266 E. Main Street, Quincy Picture L to 1 Stephanie Jay, Dana CoweR, Meagan Brennan When the three of us joined Shear Pleasure Day Spa we wanted to build up our clientele and let the community know we were offering skin care, complete hair care for men and women and massage. Even though Shear Pleasure Day Spa is well-known and has been in business in Quincy since 1980, we knew we needed to do more to build the business. To reach our goals, we decided to invest in an advertising campaign with Feather Publishing. We've run ads featuring our services and specials for Hair Care and Color Service for men and women and Skin Treatments too: We are pleased with the results and especially surprised to be getting new clients from as far away as Reno. We can tell you from our own experience that Advertising Works and we will most definitely continue to work with the ad experts at Feather Publishing. 287 Lawrenc Street, Quincy, CA  283-0800 Greenville, CA 2.,-31 IS 135 Main Street, Chester, CA. 2.8-311$ 100 Grand Ave, Susanville, CA 25%$321 ' 96 E. Sierra (Hwy 70), Porlola, CA 832-4646 r i *; Westwood PinePress P.O. Box 790, Wctwood, CA, 258-3115 including clean drinking water and the ecological integrity of riparian areas. --Plans would be required to provide habitat for plant and animal diversity and species conservation. These requirements are intended to keep common native species common, contribute to the recovery of threatened and endangered species, conserve proposed and candidate species and protect species of conservation concern. --Plans would provide for multiple uses, including outdoor recreation, range, timber, watershed, wildlife and fish. --Plans would be required to provide opportunities for sustainable recreation, and ,,to,take into account opportu- nities to connect people With nature. --Opportunities for public involvement and collaboration would be required throughout all stages of the planning process. The preferred alterna- tive would provide opportuni- ties for tribal consultation and coordination with state and local governments and other federal agencies, and include requirements for outreach to traditionally underrepre- sented communities. --Plans require the use of the best available scientific information to inform the planning process and docu- mentation of how science was used in the plan. --The planning framework provides a more efficient and adaptive process for land management planning, allow- ing the Forest Service to re- spond to changing conditions. "This approach requires plans to conserve and restore watersheds and habitats while strengthening community col- laboration during the devel- opment and implementation of individual plans," said U.S. Forest Service Chief Tom TidweU. "Under our preferred alternative, plan revisions would take less time, cost less money and provide stronger protections for our lands and water. Finalizing a new rule will move us forward in managing our forests and grasslands, and will create or sustain jobs and income for local communities around the country." Continuing the strong em- phasis USDA and the Forest Service have placed on public engagement throughout this rule-making effort, USDA is forming a Federal Advisory Committee to advise the iSecretary on implementation of the final rule. The call for nominations for this committee was published in the Federal Register Jan. 5 and will close Feb. 21. "We value the input we have received from the public throughout this process," said Agriculture Under Secretary for Natural Resources and En- vironment Harris Sherman. "This preferred alternative is a positive framework that will allow the Forest Service to more effectively restore our natural resources, support the economy and adapt to chang- ing conditions." The planning rule provides the framework for Forest Ser- vice land management plans for the 155 forests, 20 grass- lands and one prairie in the national forest system. A final rule, when selected, would up- date planning procedures that have been in place since 1982, creating a modern planning process that reflects the latest science and knowledge of how to create and implement effec- tive land management plans. Revisions of the land manage- ment plans would take less time and cost less money under the preferred alterna- tive than under the current 30-year-old procedures, while achieving better results for people and the environment. The mission of the U.S. Forest Service is to sustain the health, diversity and productivity of the nation's forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners and maintains the largest forestry research orgamzatjoa ,the world. USDA,w, or lwith state and local governmegt and private landowners to conserve and protect our nation's natural resources -- helping preserve our land and clean our air and water. President Obama launched the America's Great Outdoors initiative in 2010 to foster a 21st-century approach to conservation that is designed by and accom- plished in partnership with the American people. During the past two years, USDA's conservation agencies -- the Natural Resources Conserva- tion Service, the U.S. Forest Service and the Farm Service Agency -- have delivered tech- nical assistance and imple- mented restoration practices on public and private lands. These agencies are working to better target conservation in- vestments: embracing locally driven conservation and entering partnerships that focus on large, landscape- scale conservation. Smurf is a gray & white neutered male about 8 months old Sadly he's from a broken home. Help mend Smur's broken heart and take him home today. Hot Shot a an adult neutered male in good condition and chocolate point colored. He was tooling around Indian Valley looking for a little wampum. Shelter hours ore Monday, Wednesday & Friday 8am-5pm, closed 1-2pm for lunch and ,CO-closed weekends. Plumas Animal Services charges a $10 fee and license fees are $5 per year. #@h U,An ameer will deliver a pel Io the adopting party's veterinary of choice to have the animal altered in complelion of the adoption requirement. For more information, call 283-3673 or visit counlyofplumas.com or petnders.com. _O0@ [ 0060000r00s00*nts* 1 F Nutrena- Quincy Excellence Inside" (next to Feather River Fitness) Your Local Full Service Pet & Feed Store 283-9605