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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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February 1, 2012     Feather River Bulletin
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February 1, 2012
 

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12B Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter EDITORIAL, from page lOB spirit of the law. One attor- ney cut to the chase: the school district's approach "could be construed to inten- tionaUy deprive the public of participation in that it.forces a waiting game. It is not only inefficient and problematic, it suggests subterfuge." Is it any wonder communi- ty members are expressing an unprecedented level of cynicism about the school closure process and school district leadership? The board itself recognizes that it has a problem: in this issue it uses the district's advertising space (see page 2B) to try to reassure citizens that it has come to no conclusions about school closures. The board could go a long way toward reestablishing credibility by junking its cur- rent inhumane approach to its agenda and adopting an ef- ficient, user-friendly one that encourages public participa- tion. Events Around Plumas County Fri, Feb. 3- Almanor Hanger District: Free guided snowshoe walk, 1 - 3:30 p.m., WEATHER PERMITTING. One- to two-mile walk open to everyone 8 years and up; snowshoes provided. Participants will learn about winter ecology and survival skills. Pre-registration re- quired: Barbara Jackson. 258-2141. Quincy: Last day to order $20 Super Bowl barbecue tri-tip. Fundraiser benefits Quincy Little League. Pick up Sunday, Feb. 5, noon - 2 p.m. at Sav-Mor. For information, to order: Michelle Morrison, 283-3322. Opening gala, 5 - 7 p.m., Main Street Artists' Gallery. Featuring SweetArt, dedicated to tender feelings. Wine, choco- late, appetizers will be served. For information: 283-1909. FlyWire and Friends performance, 7 p.m., Pangaea Care and Pub. Free concert; food and drink available for purchase. FlyWire string quartet blends classical and contemporary. For information: Plumas Arts, 283-3402, in- fo@plumasarts.com. Sat, Feb. 4 Bucks Lake: Bucks Lake Poker Run, registration 9 - 11 a.m., Lakeshore Resort. Sponsored by Bucks Lake Snowdrifters. Barbecue, giveaways, cash prizes. If no snow, event will be held March 10. For information: 283-9766. Chester: Elks Annual Surf & Turf Dinner; social hour 6 p.m., dinner 7; Almanor Elks Lodge on Main Street. Menu includes shrimp, rib-eye steak, twice-baked potato, salad, dessert. Tickets $30 each, advance sale only via David Price Jewelers, Rouland Insurance, Dan Smith at 258-3987. For information: Steve DeWitt, 258-4222. Lake Davis: Ice Fishing Tournament, check-in 7 - 9 a.m., J&J Gr!zzly Store and Camping Resort. Entry fee $20. Fish- ing starts 8 a.m.; weigh-in 3 p.m.; prize drawings. Anglers must bring valid California fishing license to enter. Combina- tion of length, weight on any one fish determines score. Proceeds go to American Cancer Society. Registration avail- able at KS Market, Millworks, J&J, 420incfishing.com. For information: John, 832-9659. Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walk, 1:30 p.m., meet at I(ohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Explore winter ecology and Lassen's geologic history for 1.5 to two hours. Must be at least 8, capable of moderate physical exercise. Infants and children in carriers not allowed. Wear boots, dress in warm layers, bring water bottle. Snowshoes provided, suggested donation $1. Reservations required for organized groups: 595-6133. For information: 595-4480. Quincy: Semi-monthly Pancake Breakfast, 7 - 10:30 a.m., Masonic Hall at 70 Harbison St. across from the library. Breakfast consists of scrambled eggs, sausage, O J, coffee, hot chocolate, all-you-can-eat pancakes. Donations at the door: adults $6, children under 12 $3, students with ID $5. Proceeds benefit scholarship fund, other fraternal purposes. Benefit for Rainbow Girls Taco Feed, 4 - 7 p.m., Masonic Hall at 70 Harbison St. Two tacos, beans, rice, beverage for $6; meals to go available. Proceeds benefit Grand Assembly trip. Sun, Feb. 5 Lassen Volcanic Nafiplal Rlc-r .....  , Ranger-led snowshoe walk, 1:30 p.m., meet at Kohm Yah-inch-nee Visitor Center. Explore winter ecology and Lassen's geologic history for 1.5 to two hours. Must be at least 8, capable of moderate physical exercise. Infants and children in carriers not allowed. Wear boots, dress in warm layers, bring water bottle. Snowshoes provided, suggested donation $1. Reservations required for organized groups: 595-6133. For information: 595-4480. Tue, Feb. 7 Quincy: Family Science Night, 6 - 8 p.m., Quincy Elementary School. Fun-filled event called "Great Explorations!" includes hands-on activities and features local experts. Free admission. Food available for purchase starting at 5:30 as fifth- and sixth-grade fundraiser. Entrepreneurship speaker series, Room 103 in Learning Resource Center at Feather River College. Speakers 6:30 - 7:30 p.m., networking 7:30 - 8:30 p.m. Business and community members invited to attend gathering of local and regional business professionals to share experiences and insights. Free admission and parking. For information: Amy Schulz, as- chulz@frc.edu, 283-0202, ext. 358. Thu, Feb. 9 •Quincy: Words & Music, 7 p.m., Morning Thunder. Open stage follows featured artist; sign up at the door to perform. Tickets $3. Beverages avai}able for purchase. For information: Plumas Arts, 283-3402. Sat, Feb. 11 Greenville: Annual Crab Crack Dinner and Auction, Greenville Town Hall. For information, tickets: 284-6633. Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walk, 1:30 p.m., meet at Kohm Yah-inch-nee Visitor Center. Explore winter ecology and Lassen's geologic history for 1.5 to two hours. Must be at least 8, capable of moderate physical exercise. Infants and children in carriers not allowed. Wear boots, dress in warm layers, bring water bottle. Snowshoes provided, suggested donation $1. Reservations required for organized groups: 595-6133. For information: 595-4480. Sun, Feb. 12 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walk, 1:30 p.m., meet at Kohm Yah-inch-nee Visitor Center. Explore winter ecology and Lassen's geologic history for 1.5 to two hours. Must be at least 8, capable of moderate physical exercise. Infants and children in carriers not allowed. Wear boots, dress in warm layers , bring water bottle. Snowshoes provided, suggested donation $1. Reservations required for organized groups: 595-6133. For information: 595-4480. Tue, Feb. 14 Quincy: ACT Comedy Night, 7 - 9:30 p.m., Town Hall Theatre. The Association of Concerned Theatregoers presents a night of local comedic talent. Hors d'oeuvres, wine, beer, chocolate, laughs. For information: Terry Gallagher, 283-3418. Fri, Feb. 17 Almanor Ranger District: Free guided snowshoe walk, 1 - 3:30 p.m., WEATHER PERMITTING. One- to two-mile walk open to everyone 8 years and up; snowshoes provided, Participants will learn about winter ecology and survival skills. Pre-tegistration re- quired: Barbara Jackson, 258-2141. **To include free or nonprofit, fundraising, educational or charity events in this calendar, email iburke@plumasnews.com or call Ingdd Burke at 283.0800. For sporting events, induding charity golf tournaments, call Shannon Morrow at 283-0800 or email smorrow@plumasnews.com. We will publish the name of the even location, date, time and a phone number, as space permits. rl m I SENIOR MENU For the nutrition site in your |area call: Chester, 394-7636; Quincy, 283-0643; Greenville, 284-6608; Portola, 832.4173 (call day before to make reservation); Blairsden, 836- 0446 (Wednesdays only). |Suggested lunch donation price is $2.50. One guest may accompany each senior, mandatory charge. tram tm tm tm mint m vegetables, oat muffin, man- darin orange jello Tuesday, Feb. 7 Roast beef, parsley new pota- toes, brussel sprouts, whole wheat roll, apricots Wednesday, Feb. 8 Orange Monday, Feb. 6 dumplings, peas, carrots, ic e = Chester site closed (county cream sundae | furlough day). *High sodi- Thursday, Feb. 9 um day. Juice, macaroni & Beef stroganoff, noodles, red| cheese with sausage, roasted "cabbage, waldorf spiced peaches salad, | Friday, Feb. 10 Quincy site closed (county | furlough day). Vegetarian: chef salad: garbanzo & kid-| ney beans, cheese, eggs, let- tuce, tomatoes, french roll, | juice, chicken & fruit cup mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm mm === === -m LETTERS, from page 11B Not our fault I have several friends who have lost their homes to fore- closure. This was not their fault at all. It is not our fault that home prices dropped pre- cipitously. It is not our fault that banks have used fraudu- lent practices to accomplish most foreclosures. It is not our fault that businesses closed and we lost jobs. It is not our fault that banks refuse to renegotiate under- water mortgages. People are going through this terrible ex- perience with almost no help from anyone. Last week we heard that the federal government was mak- ing a deal to get a compara- tively small sum from the big banks, which supposedly would go to helping people. Also to remove the banks' lia- bility to be investigated and charged for all the past fraud- ulent activities, in other words tacitly admitting their guilt. This would have been a tragedy! Last night the presi. dent said there would be a fed- eral investigation of the banks. Thanks, Obama, final- ly. This change of plans was due to a number of states' at- torneys general refusing to be part of the plan to free banks from litigation and to much pressure from lots of people. Thank you, everyone. So, if you are in foreclosure or pre-foreclosure, don't just give in! Find ways to postpone it. There is help if we strug- gle. Check out the Occupy Quincy Facebook page or call me. Judy Houck Quincy Questions Regarding the story "Mayor issues challenge to city resi- dents," which ran in the Jan. 18 issue of the Port01a Re- porter, I need to set the record straight. Inthe referenced ar- ticle, Ms. Jorgenson states that I submRted a list of ques- tions, "... she (and fellow citi- zens, presumably) felt were based on assumptions rather than fact ..." regarding the re- port that the council used to justify the water and sewer rate hikes. The questions submitted were not my questions. They're good ones, but they're not mine. During the second incarnation of the ad hoc com- mittee, Juliana Mark and Todd Roberts met with indi- viduals well-acquainted with our water issues. Among them was Ms. Mark's guest, Wyatt Troxel of the Inland Empire Utilities Agency. Af- ter their meeting and tour of Portola's sewer system, Mr. Troxel took the time to review the report and formulate questions he felt needed to be asked. He submitted those questions to Ms. Mark who, in turn, gave copies to all pre- sent at the next ad hoc meet- ing. I posted those questions to my website (sites.google.com/site/portola adhoc/home/documents) on Aug. 5, 2011. When I gave the questions to the council and staff at the council meeting Jan. 11, I stat- ed very clearly for the record the source of the questions. I am saddened to see that the Feather Publishing editor- ial board would allow a story to go out that uses the word "presumably" rather than in- sisting that the writer do a lit- tle fact-checking so that the story is correct. I respectfully request that if Ms. Jorgenson has any presumptions regard- ing my actions that she con- tact me directly. I'll be happy to explain it to her. Jeanne Rowden Dansby Portola Diana Jorgenson responds: This letter demonstrates that "'clarity" exists primarily in the mind of the beholder. Here is the verbatim transcription of the verbal lead in to the list of questions presented: Mayor Juliana Mark (after read- ing the agenda item description): "7 think by opening this, I would like to request if maybe Jeanne would like to answer. We were talking about the lists of questions that you have put together that we hadn't seen due to all these defer - ent activity. I'd like to see if we could go ahead and get that and." Jeanne Dansby: "What I have here tonight, during the time that the ad hoc committee was in effect, there was a tour and these were the questions that Wyatt Troxel had recommended to us." I did not write that Dansby had written the questions but that she had presented them. Mayor Mark said that she (Dansby) had put them together; Dansby did not con- tradict her. In any case, the word "'presum- ably" was used not in conjunction with authorship, but endorsement: the feelings of those presenting. I "presumed" that other members of the 'citizens group agreed that these were valid questions to ask. Flawed The Rural Schools and Community Self-Determina- tion Act of 2000 was extended for FY 2009 - 11. With the re- cent loss of federal funding for schools, roads and other pro- jects in rural counties it ap- pears that they believe our policies are fundamentally flawed. California municipali- ties are "home-rule" but are overruled by Dillon's Rule. I believe some of our funda- mental policies as municipali- ties are flawed. Discretionary use of public funds is funda- mentally flawed. One example is the Board of Supervisors' use of $100,000 contingency funds to join in litigation with Butte County against the De- partment of Water Resources. Letters to state officials who oversee the DWR would be fundamentally correct. This is the policy they are us- ing with the U.S. Forest Ser- vice to save businesses in Greenville. If the BOS were following fundamentally cor- rect policy they would be lis- tening to Jack Ingstad who recommended funding the visitors bureau with contin- gency funds. Supervisor Thrall muzzled the head of the Office of Economic Develop- ment. Our leaders should be working together on econom- ic development with incen- tives to those who are produc- tive. A policy of the restricted use of transient occupancy taxes could fund our econom- ic' recovery like it did in Loudoun County, Va. Plumas Corp. was success- ful as the center for economic development. It implemented the 2002 Economic Strategy, Survival of the fittest has merit. It allows your offspring to see your mistakes and hopefully "learn" from them; perhaps in a few generations they will be wealthy in many ways. Another twist on "fair- ness": imagine if "slaves" were never brought to Ameri- ca in the 1600s by the Dutch. The current 15 percent voting block would all be in Africa dealing with clean water is- sues, malaria and an AIDS epidemic. Trent Saxton Lake Davis Top priority I enjoyed reading the article last week about Lake A1- manor resident Suzanne Plop- per visiting the Lambs Sup- port Girls' Education Project in Burkina Faso, West Africa, which she has personally sup- ported for the last decade. It was interesting to read how starting with one lamb, a family can then provide years of education for a daughter. It was sobering to read about these girls who are desperate for an education and a better life with opportunities. Thanks to people like Suzanne who has generously provided hope and education to these girls. Some girls have become teachers and return the gift of education to their homeland. The dedicated par- ents help build a structure of local mud and thatch made of • stubble from the fields for the school room. It always bog- gles my mind that there are still places like this in the world where educational op- portunities are limited and perhaps non-existent. In contrast, as we struggle in rural Plumas County with recommendations to close schools, we should always re- member to cherish our educa- tion opportunities in this na- tion and strive to support and preserve these opportunities for the sake of our children and for generations to come. Education of children should always be a top priority. Lori Simpson Quincy which the BOS approŁecLSta ................................. pervisors Thrall and Swofford Bread and butter- have changed the direction for economic development to economic disaster. We need to build sustainable local busi- nesses and develop others. Our economic development would have been more suc- cessful with more support and a better working relationship with all concerned parties. High unemployment and de- clining median family in- comes is an indicator of poli- cy flaws. With acts of commu- nity self-determination and our leaders correcting their flawed policies we may get the support of the feds again. Larry F. Douglas Portola 'Fairness' There is opportunity in the United States versus an Afghanistan or Pakistan or a third-world nation. I doubt there will be a mass exodus to any country by the poor or progressives due to a lack of "fairness." Try as you may, not every- one is blessed with the same mental capacity that will al- low an individual to achieve prosperity. If you do use your God-given talents to their highest potential, there still may be disparity. Thus, life is not "fair." When the Lord wants you, he takes you, re- gardless of your position in • life. The next thing that liber- als will demand from the wealthy is equal time on earth. As a doctor, I can compare the treatment of the poor in the United States to those in Pakistan versus the health care we "give" away at our ERs. Who pays for our high- ways, our water and power systems, and the amount of giving by nonprofit organiza- tions to the less fortunate? The one thing we Americans all have in common is death, but not taxes. The poor pay no taxes, in fact except for cloth- ing none. They do not hire anyone; they do not drive therefore no gas tax, property tax, state tax -- you get the point. The majority rules in a democracy but not necessari- ly in a republic with a Consti- tution based on "our" princi- ples. In an effort to show the ad- ministration's gratitude to union support, new manufac- turing facilities and jobs are being created, in Mexico and Korea. General Motors gets a bailout, needs high.efficient engines not built here so they invest $540 million in Mexico. GM has to build an electric car that nobody seems to want, powered by batteries, you guessed it, from Korea. The department of energy, a presidential appointed posi- tion, gives subsidies to un- sound green businesses, and where do they invest? Sun- power (Solyndra 2.0) leases 320,000 square feet also in Mexico. I guess there's no suitable American union shops that can build engines, batteries or photovoltaic pan- els. Next time you wonder where you're going to make your "bread and butter" you might have to settle for "cake." Brian Luce Portola Not true According to Plumas-Sierra Tea Party Patriot Lynn Des- jardin, the United Nations owns/controls many of our national parks. I disagree. The U.N. produces many ideas about how the world should work, and countries ei- ther agree to abide by them or not. No country (particularly the United States) can be com- pelled to follow U.N. dictates because no enforcement mechanisms exist. If the.U.N. wants wildlife corridors, the U.S. can decide not to create them. What will the U.N. do? Nothing. No black helicopters will invade to force us to pro- vide wildlife corridors. Why? U.N. troops are deployed only with the blessing of the U.N. Security Council, over which the U.S. has absolute veto power. Desjardin mentions the use of eminent domain for shop- ping malls, but that's busi- ness, not the U.N., that does that. She also fails to point out the distinction between pub- lic and private lands. Of all See Letters, page 13B