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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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March 12, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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March 12, 2014
 

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8A Wednesday, March 12, 2014 Feather River Bulletin Land Trust program earns award The Feather River Land Trust's Learning Landscapes program received an award for innovation and excellence in nature-based education at the statewide California Council of Land Trusts annual conference. Paul Hardy, executive director of FRLT, and Rob Wade, Learning Landscapes coordinator, accepted the award in front of more than 400 dinner guests at the conference gala held at the Crocker Art Gallery.in Sacramento on Tuesday, March 4. Darla Guenzler, executive director of the California Council of Land Trusts, presented the award to Hardy and Wade, congratulating FRLT on developing a successful outdoor education model that supports teachers and schools, and inspires the future conservation stewards of the Feather River watershed. Learning Landscapes is FRLT's conservation and education program designed to greatly enhance children's contact with the natural world, place-based learning and hands-on stewardship Rob Wade, Learning Landscapes coordinator, left, and Paul Hardy, executive director of the Feather River Land Trust, accept an award atthe annual Council of California Land Trusts conference in Sacramento on March 4. Photo submitted experiences. Together with willing landowners, partners from the school district and land trust staff and expert consultants, Learning Landscapes conserves natural areas as outdoor classrooms within a 10-minute walk of every public school in the Feather River watershed, while supporting their educational use through teacher training and natural science tools. Diverse sources of funding from grants to individual donations have been acquired by FRLT to support this program. To learn more about Learning Landscapes and the Feather River Land Trust visit frlt.org or call Karen Kleven at 283-5758. See road kill- take time to report New observation center wants to study topic Laura Beaton Staff Writer Ibeaton@plumasnews.com Plumas County is notorious for the number of deer-related vehicular accidents on our highways and byways. And the county is not alone in wildlife fatalities caused by vehicles. Roadkill occurs when vehicles collide with or run over wildlife, such as birds, mammals, reptiles and amphibians. According to the Humane Society of the United States, more than a million animals are killed every day on our roads and highways. UC Davis' California Roadkill Observation Center created a website to provide a way for people to report roadkill so that researchers can understand and try to influence the factors that contribute to roadkill. This Web system can be used to record observations from observers out in the field who come across identifiable road-killed wildlife. This includes the type of animal and/or species found, where the roadkill was located, when it was found, how long it might have been dead, pictures of the roadkill and any additional details about road or traffic conditions. The system then displays a summary of this information for different animal groups across the state, which is available in considerable detail at wildlifecrossing.net. Why is roadkill information valuable? Information about where wildlife vehicle collisions occur, what animals are involved, on what kinds of roads are collisions frequent and other data can help inform policy, management and financial investment in reducing.roadkill. The data collected are presented back to collaborators on the website and used to improve the collective understanding of how roadkill occurs and what can be done to reduce it. For instance, a crossing structure for wildlife was recently installed at Kyburz on Highway 89 north of Truckee. Terri Weist, California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist and roadkill observer, said, "These structures can run into millions of dollars so it is important to place them where they will do the most good and reduce not just the impact to wildlife but reduce injury to people as well." CROS is a research organization and its primary role is to understand the ecological, wildlife behavior and transportation contributions to this problem. This includes GIS (geographic information system) and statistical modeling to predict roadkill hotspots, to measure the contributing factors to roadkill, to quantify impacts and to estimate benefits of different remedial actions. CROS also collaborates with other organizations to get funding to support this work and to inform planning of structures and management practices to reduce wildlife vehicle collisions. For more information on hotspots or to report incidences of roadkill, go to wildlifecrossing.net. Nearly a hundred years ago the problem had already been identified. "This (roadkill) is a relatively new source of fatality; and if one were to estimate the entire mileage of such roads in the state, the mortality must mount into the hundreds and perhaps thousands every 24 hours," said wildlife biologist Joseph Grinnell in 1920. Editor's note: This artide indudes excerpts from the CROS websita PUBLIC NOTICES Inspection project Plumas-Sierra Rural Electric Cooperative will be conducting inspections of its facilities throughout 2014. Specific vegetation man- agement projects planned within the tim- bred portions of its service area include but are not limited to, Chandler Road, the Cromberg area, Spring Garden area, Greeagle, and Calpine. We will also be inspecting for trees and other vegetation in proximity to the power lines as required by the California Public Resource Code Section 4293. Trees that come in contact with power lines are a major cause of outages on our system. PSREC strives to strike a healthy balance between our appreciation for trees and our obligation to provide safe, reliable electric service. Through our tree trimming program, we redirect tree growth away from power lines and remove any damaged or diseased trees so we can limit potential damage to the power lines which could be .C, aus by extreme weather conditions, If a 'free grvs too fast or if its proximity to power lines is a threat to our electric system, our experts will trim the growth away from our equipment. Our vegetation management is conducted following best management prac- tices defined in ANSI A300 Part 7 (ANSI 2012) and the ISA companion publication to the ANSI A300 Standards (ISA 2007). Currently PSREC is doing a comprehensive mapping/inspection project that encompass- es the entire service area. These inspec- tions are part of our ongoing work to provide our members with safe, reliable electric ser- vice. We will be inspecting electrical equip- ment as required by California General Orders 95 and 128 and determining the location and condition of our infrastructure. PSREC personnel require access to all of its facilities including meters. PSREC employ- ees will have company ID with them. Published FRB, PR Feb. 26, March 5, 12, 19, 26, April 2, 9, 16, 23, 30, May 7, 14, 2014J USDA FOREST SERVICE Plumes National Forest Mt. Hough Ranger District Plumes County, CA NOTICE OF DECISION SUNSET CONSOLIDATED (CHINA BAR) PLACER MINING PROJECT Upon review of the Sunset Consolidated (China Bar) Placer Mining Project Environmental Assessment (EA), the Mt. Hough District Ranger (Responsible Official) made the decision to implement Alternative 2, which is the Proposed Action. The Proposed Action allows for approval of the: Plan of Operations submitted by the claimant contingent upon specific manage- ment constraints and mitigation measures. This decision is consistent with the Plumas National Forest Land Management Plan. The project was designed in conformance with the 1872 Mining Law, Public Law 167 (Multiple-Use Mining Act of 1955), Locatable Minerals Surface Management Regulations (36 CFR 228, Subpart A), and the Sierra Nevada Framework Ran Amendment (FEIS & ROD, 2004). The project is located in the vicinity of Seneca, California. Legal location is T26N, RTE, Section 24 and T26N, R8E, Section 19. This decision is not subject to objection pur- suant to the regulation in 36 CFR 218.4. No timely, specific written comments regarding the proposed action or alternatives analyzed and documented in the EA were received during any designated opportunity for public comment. This decision is subject to appeal by the applicant pursuant to the regulation in 36 CFR 214.4 (b). A Notice of Appeal must be consistent with 36 CFR 214.8 and filed with- in 45 days from the date of the decision. Copies of the EA, Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact, are avail- able upon request from Assistant Minerals Officer, Leslie Edlund, Mt. Hough Ranger District, 39696 Highway 70, Quincy, CA, 95971, (530) 283-0555. Published FRB March 12, 2014] USDA FOREST SERVICE Plumes National Forest lilt, Hough Ranger District Plumes County, CA NOTICE OF DECISION EL RICO MINA MINERAL EXPLORATION PROJECT Upon review of the El Rico Mina Mineral Exploration Project Environmental Assessment (EA), the Mt. Hough District Ranger (Responsible Official) made the decision to implement Alternative 1, which is the Proposed Action. The Proposed Action allows for approval of the Plan of Operations submitted by the claimant contingent upon specific management constraints and miti- gation measures. This decision is consistent with the Plumas National Forest Land Management Plan. The project was designed in conformance with the 1872 Mining Law, Public Law 167 (Multiple-Use Mining Act of 1955), Locatable Minerals Surface Management Regulations (36 CFR 228, Subpart A), and the Sierra Nevada Framework Plan Amendment (FEIS & ROD, 2004). The project is located in the vicinity of Greenville, California. Legal location is T26N, R9E, Section 4. This decision is not subject to objection pur- suant to the regulation i n 36 CFR 218.4. No timely, specific written comments regarding the proposed action,'or:altematives analyzed and documented in the EA were received during any designated opportunity for public comment. This decision is subject to appeal by the applicant pursuant tO the regulation in 36 CFR 214.4 (b). A Notice of Appeal must be consistent with 36 CFR 214.8 and filed with- in 45 days from the date of the decision. Copies of the EA, Decision Notice and Finding of No Significant Impact, are avail- able upon request from Assistant Minerals Officer, Leslie Edlund, Mt. Hough Ranger District, 39696 Highway 70, Quincy, CA, 95971, (530) 283-0555. Published FRB March 12, 20141 Music festival hearing NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING APPLICATION FOR MUSIC FESTIVAL BELDEN TOWN RESORT "EMISSIONS" The Plumas County Board of Supervisors will be holding a public hearing on the fol- lowing matter on Tuesday, April 08, 2014 at 10:15 a.m. in the Board of Supervisor Room 308, Courthouse, Quincy, California. Pursuant to Ordinance 02-967 regarding "Outdoor Festivals", application has been received from Belden Town Resort for out- door music festivals: "EMISSIONS"- MAY 16-18, 2014 The Board will take public input and com- ments about this event, and conditions appropriate for the permit. For further information on the above hearing please contact: the Clerk of the Board at (530) 283-6170. Written comments should be mailed to the Plumas County Board of Supervisors, 520 Main Street, Room 309, Quincy, California 95971. Published FRB March 12, 20141 Scoping Notice Rush Skeleton Weed Project Plumes National Forest Beckwourth Ranger District The USDA Forest Service Plumas National Forest, Beckwourth Ranger District will pre- pare an Environmental Assessment (EA) to treat the noxious weed known as rush skele- ton weed (Chondrilla juncea) on the Beckwourth .Ranger District near Plumas Eureka State Park. The Rush Skeleton Weed project involves treating a known infestation of rush skeleton weed on approx- imately 1.5 acres and identifying and treat- ing new or expanded infestations on a max- imum of 42 acres. The following treatments would be used: Manual treatment - Techniques would include digging, hand pulling, or tarp- ing. Chemical treatment - Herbicide Application methods would include select, directed spray, or wicking. No aerial applica- tion of herbicides is proposed in this project. A detailed description of the purpose and need and proposed action is available online on the Plumas National Forest webpage under Land and Resources Management. If you would like a copy of the document, please contact Michael #fiend, project leader, by phone: (530)836-2575, or e-mail: mjfriend@fs.fed.us. The project area is located 3 miles northwest of the Beckwourth Ranger Station on the Beckwourth Ranger District of the Plumas National Forest, Plumas County; the legal location is Township 22 N, Range 11 E, Section 1, Mount Diablc Meridian. Our desire is to receive comments or other expressions of interest on the merits of the proposed action, as well as comments that address errors, misinformation, or informa- tion that has been omitted. Public questions and comments regarding this proposal are an integral part of this environmental analy- sis process. Comments will be used to iden- tify issues and develop alternatives to the proposed action. To assist the Forest Service in identifying and considering issues and concerns on the proposed action, com- ments should be as specific as possible. Comments on the scope of the proposed action will be accepted for 14 calendar days from the publication of this notice in the Portola Reporter. This project is subject to comment pursuant to 36 CFR 218. Only those who submit timely project-specific writ- ten comments during a public comment peri- od are eligible to file an objection. There will be another opportunity to comment when the Environmental Analysis is .complete. Individuals or representatives of an entity submitting comments must sign the com- ments or verify identity upon request. Provide comments by mail, fax, small, or in- person to Deb Bumpus, Responsible Official, District Ranger, c/o Michael Friend, Project Leader, at Beckwourth Ranger District, P.O. Box 7, Blairsden, CA:96103; fax number: (530)836-0493; e-mail address: comments-pacificsouthwest- plumas-beckwourth@fs.fed.us. Please indi- cate the name "Rush Skeleton Weed Project" on the subject line of your email. Acceptable formats for electronic submis- sions include small message, plain text (.txt), rich text format (.rtf), Word (.doc or .docx) or portable document file (.pdf). Submit hand-delivered comments during business hours, Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm. Published PR, FRB March 12, 19, 26, 2014 I Bids for I.PG storage tanks Request for Proposals The PlOmas Unified School District is seek- ing proposals for the purchase and delivery of 2 separate 15,000 gallon above-ground liquid-propane storage tanks. Units must meet all Specifications and State and Federal codes and regulations. One located at 155 Sixth Avenue, Portola, CA. 96122. One located at 246 Alder Street, Quincy, CA. 95971. All work related to the manufacturing and delivery of these units shall be included in a sealed bid clearly marked as "LPG Storage Tanks" and delivered to the Plumas Unified School District at 50 Church St., Quincy, CA 95971 by 2:00 p.m. Friday, March 28, 2014. Bids shall be opened at that time and any bid received after that date shall be returned unopened. Bid Documents including Specifications for the LPG Storage Tanks are available upon request at the Plumas Unified School District at 50 Church St., Quincy, CA 95971. For more information please contact Mr. Ken Pierson at (530) 283-6545, or kpierson @ pcoe.k12.ca.us Published PR, FRB March 12, 19, 20141 Bids for QES boiler Request for Proposals The Plumas Unified School District is seek- ing proposals for the purchase and delivery of 1- 2.1 million BTU/Hr input Boiler. Unit must meet all Specifications and State and Federal codes and regulations. Unit shall be delivered to: Quincy Elementary School, located at 246 Alder Street, Quincy, CA. 95971. All work related to the manufacturing and delivery of this unit shall be included in a sealed bid clearly marked as "QES Boiler" and delivered to the Plumes Unified School District at 50 Church St., Quincy, CA 95971 by 2:15 p.m. Friday, March 28, 2014. Bids shall be opened at that time and any bid received after that date shall be returned unopened. Bid Documents including Specifications for the QES Boiler are available upon request at the Plumas Unified School District at 50 Church St., Quincy, CA 95971. For more information please contact Mr. Ken Pierson at (530) 283-6545, or kpierson@pcoe.k12.ca.us Published FRB March 12, 19, 20141 N QTIF!C,ATIQN OF EVIDENT!ARY HEARINGS REGARDING PACIFIC GAS AND ..... ELECTRIC COMPANY'S SUPPLEMENTAL FILING FOR SUMMER 2014 RESIDENTIAL ELECTRIC RAT E REFORM (R,12-06-013, Phase 2) March 24-26, 2014 from 9:30 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. at the address below: California Public Utilities Commission Courtroom State Office Building 505 Van Ness Avenue San Francisco, CA 94102 On January 28, 2014, Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PC&E) provided the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) a supplemental request to change residential rates, to be effective summer of 2014. PG&E's request complies with a ruling from the CPUC inviting electric utilities to file proposals that will better align rates with the actual costs of providing electric service and to simplify rate plans. ABOUT THIS PROPOSAL On October 7, 2013, Assembly Bill 327 (AB 327) was signed into law. This new law authorizes the CPUC to consider several changes to California's electricity rate structure. Through this filing, PG&E is requesting approval to beg!n reforming its residential electric rate slructure consistent with AB 327. ' J PG&E's summer 2014 rate reform proposal includes: ,, Increases to tier 1 and tier 2 rates to provide for decreases for tier 3 and 4 rates for standard residential and time-clause rate plans. Increases to tier 1, 2, and 3 rates for residential customers on the Californi,= Alternate Rates for Energy (CARE) program. This proposed change is an initial step to reduce the CARE discount to bring the discount closer to the 30-35 percent range required by AB 327. ........ The chart below illustrates the iro_qposed changes in rates. Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3 Tier 4 Non-CARE Current Proposed (S/kWh) (S/kWh) $0.136 $0.147 $0.155 $0.170 $0.314 $0.286 $0.354 .... _[ '$0.'346 ....... Proposed Rate Change $0.011 $0.015 - bT.o - -$o.oo8 i CARE Current (S/kWh) $0.086 Proposed Proposed (S/kWh) Rate Change i$oi091 $o.oo5 t PG&E's proposal will not change the amount of total revenues PG&E collects. A residential customer living in climate zone X and using 550 kWh per month would see a monthly increase of $9.95 (or 11 percent) from $89.81 to $99.76. If approved by the CPUC, some residential customers would see bill increases and others will see bill decreases, depending upon their monthly usage levels and their rate plan. EVIDENTIARY HEARINGS Evidentiary hearings are scheduled for this proceeding. At the hearings, PG&E and other formal parties to the proceeding present their evidence through testimony and are subject to cross-examination before an Administrative Law Judge. The hearings are open to the public, but only those who are formal parties are permitted to present evidence and/or cross-examine witnesses. After considering all proposals and evidence presented during the formal process, the Judge will issue a proposed decision which may accept PG&E's proposal, modify it or reject it. The Commissioners may also issue alternate decisions based on the record. The proposed decision and any alternates will be acted upon at a CPUC voting meeting where the Commissioners will decide whether to adopt the proposed or an alternate decision. The Commission Courtroom is wheelchair accessible. If you wish to attend and need specialized accommodations, please contact the Public Advisor's Office at least three business days prior to the hearing date. Any changes to the dates, times, and locations of the hearings will be posted to the CPUC's Daily Calendar. If you would like a copy of PG&E's supplemental filing and exhibits, please write to: PG&E, Residential Rate Reform (R.12-06-013, Phase 2) P.O. Box 7442, San Francisco, CA 94120. A copy of PG&E's supplemental filing and exhibits are also available for review at the CPUC, 505 Van Ness Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94102, Monday - Friday, 8 a.m - noon. PG&E's supplemental filing (without exhibits) is available on the CPUC's webslte at www.c u .ca, vl uc, PUBLIC CMMEI$ AND OPINIONS ARE IMPORTANT TO THE CPUC As part of its decision-making process, the CPUC is interested in your public comments or opinions on any aspect of the company's operations, including proposed rates, service quality or any other issue of concern. If you are writing a letter or sending an e-mail to the Public Advisor's Office regarding this proposed supplemental filing, please include the proceeding number (R12-06-013, .Phase 2) to which you are referring. All comments wilt be circulated to the Commissioners the assigned Judge, and other appropriate CPUC staff. All informal comments are also provided to the CPUC's Formal Files Office as part of the formal public i comment file for this proceeding. Please send all e-mails or written correspondence regarding :your comments and opinions to the address listed below: The Public Advisor's Office California Public Utilities Commission 505 Van Ness Avenue, Room 2103 San Francisco, CA 94102 E-Mail: public.advisor@ctuc.ca.aov 1-866-849-8390 (toll-free) or 1-4i5..703-2074 1-866-836-7825 (toll-free) or TTY 1-415-703-5282 .... r ....... Published FRB, March 12, 2014 ....... :i :`:i'::?: ....... .!i!! ':, ':, :' : .... , . BRo_AKING NEWS