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Feather River Bulletin
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May 7, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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May 7, 2014
 

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116B Wednesday, May 7, 2014 ulu,,, recoro, 'rogresslve, Kepolter To Lake Almanor Basin photographer Jan Davies, taking photographs in low afternoon light adds softness, and to her, "evokes the hometown feeling." DAVIES, from page 1B worth sharing with the public. Equipment choices "I have been using mostly Canon bodies and Canon or Sigma lenses. I am using equipment that is deemed for the 'enthusiast'; my latest camera body is the Canon EOS 70D inounted with a 70 - 300 mm lens and I also have a mid-size Nikon D5000 with an 8 - 200 mm Sigma lens. "It is frankly amazing the quality that can be produced on this level of equipment, compared to the components the pros use that can cost tens of thousands of dollars," she said. Beauty and health "My closing thought about photography that I want to share has to do with the mindful quality of taking photographs. "It is a very Buddhist thing to do. I become one with the object for a time -- my observation is a form of meditation; my breath and heart must quiet to follow, to know, to feel the beauty and activity around me. "To connect with nature, to one's own instincts, is very powerful. For some this happens out hunting or fishing, knitting or painting, cooking or even digging a Photographer Jan Davies says one of the great things about the versatility of digital cameras is the ability to take color images and then edit them into black and white. "Black and white releases some of the clutter in a landscape and brings it down to bare contrast, which I believe has a calming effect," she said. Photos by Jan Davies "It is a very Buddhist thing to do. I become one with the object for a time - my observation is a form of meditation; my breath and heart must quiet to follow, to know, to feel the beauty and activity around me." Jan Davies Lake Almanor Basin photographer ditch. It doesn't matter so much what you are doing as how you move into the action, become the experience rather than living outside it. "Perhaps what makes my photos compelling for people is this quality of presence rather than just looking at something to take its picture," she said. More about Davies Jan Davies has lived in Plumas County since 1977 when she moved here from the Los Angeles suburbs of San Gabriel Valley. She lived in Greenville until 1981 when she met Lake Almanor resident Bill Davies. The two were married in 1983. Bill is a native-born local, who attended school in Greenville. Davies wears many hats, including working in private practice as a whole health educator (integrative health coach) and spiritual consultant. She has also helped manage Bill's backhoe business for almost 25 years, running his office and occasiorally a tractor! "I have sPent over 20 years working as a patient care volunteer with Sierra Hospice, past board president and bereavement director, though now I work mostly on the fringes of hospice," Davies said. Mourning dove banding workshop comes to Plumas County The mourning dove is the subject of a nationwide population study on harvest and survival rates. Locals can get involved at an upcoming training. Photo courtesy California Department of Fish and Wildlife Biologists from the California Department of Fish and Wildlife will lead a mourning dove banding workshop as part of a long-term banding study, staffed almost completely by trained and dedicated volunteers. The purpose of the study is to estimate band reporting and harvest rates and is part of a nationwide study to estimate harvest and survival rates in order to model mourning dove populations. Workshop participants will learn how to safely attract, capture, determine and record age and sex, band and release the birds. "For volunteers, it is a great opportunity to get hands-on experience with wildlife," said Julie Newman, senior environmental scientist with CDFW's North Central Region. "It can also be an exciting family project for summer break, as the banding study is held from July 1 to Aug. 20 each year" The training will take place Friday, May 16, at 3 p.m, at  Feather River College Science Room 104. Contact Jessica Spalding at jessica.spalding@wildlife:ca. gov to express interest in participating. invest:in= PL UMA, COUNT