Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
Lyft
June 25, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
PAGE 10     (10 of 44 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 10     (10 of 44 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
June 25, 2014
 

Newspaper Archive of Feather River Bulletin produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




IOA Wednesday, June 25, 2014 Feather River Bulletin WEEKLY ATHERINGS, MEETINGS AND CLUBS - -ursday ne 26 H ous -, Q--uu cc; -- ---- - F-or-rinfo rm n, c-all- e AA, noon, 260 County Rotary Club, Mineral library, 283-6310. Hospital Road, Courthouse Friday, June 27 Building, fairgrounds, noon. After-School Kids Club. Call 283-2127. Arts and crafts projects, Annex- Orchard House. AA, noon, 260 County Boy Scout Troop 151, Mon., science activities, games, Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) Hospital Road, Courthouse 6 p m Scoutmaster Jan stories, snacks. 2nd - 6th 880-3880. Annex- Orchard House. Quincy Cribbage Group. Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) Jensen, 283-2209 for location, grades (younger children Duplicate Bridge. Every must be accompanied by Every Thurs., 12:30 sharp. 880-3880. Monday, 6:30 p.m., Resource adult). Free.3-5.p.m...aurmg Come early and have lunch. NA, 6:00 p.m., 260 County Round Table Pizza. No dues Hospital Road, Courthouse Center, Blairsden, corner of school year, umcy nDrary hwys 70 and 89. Call Ruthcommunity meeting room, or fees. Annex - Orchard House. Bright, 836:1454 or Jackie 445 Jackson St. 283-6310. Women's Support Group, Quincy. Every Thurs., 1-2 p.m., Trap Shoot, 1 p.m., adults Lucky, 836-2232. American Valley Plumas Crisis Center, 591 only, Sponsored by Quincy AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Toastmasters. Every Wed., Main St., Quincy. Call 283- Sport Shooting Assoc., Church, 282 Jackson St., 12-1 p.m., Plumas Bank 5515. Gopher Hill site. Weather Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) Credit Administration Plumas County Republican permitting. 283-1145. 880-3880. building, 32 Central Ave., Quincy. (Behind Safeway.) Women, 10:45 a.m., Mt. quincyshooting.com. For more info, contact Kathy, Tomba Dinnerhouse, Hwy, 70. AARP, at Mountain View 283-7618. Open to all Lunch at noon, $20, and guest Manor community room, 4th Tuesday, July 1 interested in developing their speakers to follow. Call Sat., 116 Circle Dr. 1 p.m. New AA meeting, noon, 260 speaking and leadership Marlene Nelson, 836-1547, or members welcome. Call Greg County Hospital Road, skills. Liz Holston, 836-4428, for Margason, 283-0686 for more Courthouse Annex - Orchard AA meeting, noon, 260 reservations, info. House, Quincy. 24-hour info: A1-Anon, 5:30 p.m., United Dinner at the Grange, (877) 880-3880. County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard Methodist Church, upstairs Feather River Grange Hall, Bingo, every Tuesday, for in back. For families & Quincy, 4th Fridays, 5 p.m. residents of Country Villa House, Quincy, 24-hour info: friends of alcoholics, until food is gone. Fundraiser Healthcare Center, Quincy, (877) 880-3880. Pistol shooting, sponsored by to restore the building. Call 2:30 p.m. Sponsored by Senior lunch, Blairsden, Quincy Sport Shooting Assoc., 283-2782 or 283-2930. Country Villa Pink Ladies. noon, Mohawk Community Gopher Hill site, every New volunteers needed. Call Resource Center. Call 836-0446 Thursday, 6 p.m., (arrive by Betty Hoskins, 283-1616.for reservations. 5:30 p.m.) weather permitting. Saturday, June 28 Overeaters Anonymous Grief Group, Community Quincyshooting.com. NA, noon, 260 County meeting, 4:30 p.m., 260 United Methodist Church. Boy Scouts Troop 130, 6:30 Hospital Road, Courthouse County Hospital Road, Join Pastor Donna at noon to p.m., LDS Church, 55 Be//amy Annex - Orchard House. Courthouse Annex - Orchard begin or continue the process Ln. Call Dale Stokes, 283-3661. Quincy. House, Quincy. of healing. Open to everyone. Blue Star Morns, 7 p.m., AA, 6 p.m. 260 County NA, 7 p.m., Methodist Call the church office, 283- Masonic Lodge, Harbison Hospital Road, Courthouse Church, 282 Jackson St.,1740, for more info. Street, Quincy, Annex - Orchard House. Quincy, Quincy Community Healing and Growing Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) Bible Study. (King JamesSupper, 6 p.m. every Wed, through Grief 880-3880. version) 7-8 p.m., Church of United Methodist Church. bereavement group. Open Dukes of Plumas Cribbage Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Free. to anyone struggling with Gang. Meet 10:30 a.m., start Saints, 55 Be//amy Lane,AA, 7 p.m., Methodist grief. 2-4 p.m. every other play 11 a.m., every Saturday Quincy. Open to all. Bibles Church, 282 Jackson St., Thursday, First Baptist at Mt. Tomba, Cromberg. available. Call 530-953-7790 for Quincy, 24-hour info: (877) Church, 74 Reese St., Quincy. more info. 880-3880. JoAnne Baldwin, 283-9161 or International Order of Doreene Wood, 283,3538. Sunday, June 29 Rainbow Girls, 7 p.m., Explorer Post 81, Quincy NA, noon, 260 County Wednesday, July 2 Masonic Temple, 1st & 3rd Volunteer Fire Dept. Hospital Road, Courthouse Baby Bounce Story Time. Wed. Explorer Program, meets 2nd Annex - Orchard House. Infants 0 to 24months, and 4th Thursdays. For info Quincy. Wednesdays 10 a.m., Plumas call Sarah Anderson, 530-276- NA, 5 p.m., women only, 260 County Library Quincy 1503. County Hospital Road, branch. 445 Jackson St. Plumas Alcohol, Tobacco Courthouse Annex- Orchard Preschool Storytime. and Other Drug Coalition. House. Quincy. Stories, songs, crafts and Focused on reducing alcohol, games. 10:30 a.m., tobacco and other drug Community Meeting Room, problems in Plumas County. Monday, June 30 Quincy Library, 445 Jackson 4th Thursdays, 1 p.m., Soroptimist International Courthouse Annex, Quincy, , of Quincy, rmonto 1 p.m. plumasatodcoalition@yahoo. Moon's restaurant. C H U R C H E S com. NA meeting, noon, 260 League of Women Voters, County Hospital Road, Calvary Chapel Quincy Meadow Valley Community fourth Thurs., 6 p.m. Quincy. Courthouse Annex - Orchard 283.4463. 1953 E. Main, Mill Creek 283-4259, 48 Cemetery Rd, Meadow Shopping Center, E Quincy. Valley, office: 353 Jackson St, #100, Quincy Christian Life Fellowship Our Savior Lutheran LAST WEEK'S LAKE LEVELS 283-0345, 317 First St., E. Quincy.283-2546. Church & High Sts., TEMPERATURES Quincy. Date High Low Precip Snow June16 77 46 .... June 17 72 44 .... June 18 81 35 .... June 19 85 38 .... June 20 83 43 .... June21 85 43 .... June 22 86 41 .... Precipitationfrom July 1, 2013, to date: 21.91"; snow 7" This date 2013: 37.43" precip, 23.75" snow. 2012-13 totals: 23.75" snow*, 37.93' total precip* *Weather year is July 1 to June 30 Compiled by Ron Trumbo Lake Almanor *Elevation 1Current 4,483.97 1 Year Ago 4,487.34 Lake Almanor **Capacity 1"Current 882,967 1 Year Ago 967,450 Bucks Lake *Elevation l-Current 5,137.16 1 Year Ago 5,149.40 Bucks Lake **Capacity 1-Current 71,261 1 Year Ago 91,895 Christ the King Episcopal 283-0254, 545 Lawrence St., Quincy. christthekingquincy.org Church of Christ 283.1191, 152 E. Jackson St., Quincy. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 283-2170, 55 Bellamy Ln., Quincy. Community United Methodist 283-1740, 282 Jackson St., Quincy, quincymethodist.org Seventh-Day Adventist 310-2042 or 283.3092, 2333 Pine St., Quincy. Springs of Hope Christian Fellowship Pete, 283.1613, or John, 927-7626, 59 Bell Ln., Quincy. St. John's Catholic Church 283-0890, 176 Lawrence St., Quincy. Starlight Missionary Baptist 283.1505, 171 Redburg Ave., Quincy. *Elevation above sea level **Storage in acre ft. /'June 22, 2014 June 23, 2013 in ft. First Baptist 283.1160, 74 Reese St., Quincy. fbcquincy.org Truth Tabernacle of Quincy, 260-8006, 2205 East Main St., Quincy. Weather Forecast for Quincy Earthquake Report June 12-18. 201z Wednesda June25 Sunrise 5:40-Sunset 8:39 Wednesday Night: A 20% chance of showers after 11pro. Mostly cloudy, low around 46. - Sunrise 5:41 --Sunset 8:39 Thursday, June26 Sunny, with a high near Saturday Night: Clear, with a low around 48. Sunrise 5:40--Sunset 8:39 20% chance of show- ers/thunderstorms. Partly sunny, with a high near 80. Thursday Night: Partly cloudy, with a 10w around 45. Sunrise 5:41 --Sunset 8:39 Sunny, with a high near 93; Sunday Night: Clear, with a low around 48. Fdda~June27 Mostly sunny, with a high n~ Friday Night: Partly cloudy, with a low around 46. Sunrise 5:42--Sunset 8:39 Sunny, high near 92. Tuesday, July 1 Sunrise 5:42-Sunset 8:38 O 1.0 2.6 1.0 ~l>z I 7"36am ~ 1:23 a.m.~._T__..~:_28 a.m_. _= I "6/15 " 6/17 =~ I 6/16 i 1 7 : 5:19"a.m. ] 7:16"2m I,. \,=,,'1"i/X',,i.o,,, I I i.s .... 61 2 J I 6:aoa.m. l" ~'- "~3J@ ~ ~ ! i I . '. is I 3 I 1.2" |/ ', _li \ . t ;i~| "~ 6n4 I /._ I [Magnitude I I ,., I Lol o, e, e4+1 W:i" The number of earthquakes measuring M 1.0 or stronger increased from the pre- vious week, rising by four and topping the 20 quake-per-week mark for the first time since the second week of May. The intensity of seismicity remained relaxed, producing two events in the M 2 range. Driving the action was a small seismic swarm at the California-Nevada border east of Truckee. The sequence began Fri- day afternoon and slowly clicked off a couple events a day until Tuesday after- noon when the activity stopped. All of the action was small. Largest: M 1.9. The largest quake measured M 2.6 and occurred Tuesday night on the northwest- ern slope of Lassen Peak near Whitmore. Three quakes were detected north- west of Chester and 1.5 miles south of Drakesbad near Terminal Geysers. The occurred on the Hot Springs fault, which ruptured with a large earthquake not too long ago and created the open frac- tures that are responsible for Terminal Geysers and Boiling Springs Lake. The fault displacements can still be seen today. D|ST|NGU|SHED s c . o o L = _20 4 The QES team receives a banner honoring their school at the Distinguished School Award Ceremony in Sacramento on June 9. From left; principal Kristy Warren, Rob Wade, Nancy Sipe and Yvonne.Casalnuovo. Photos by Ed Thompson A team of Plumas Unified School District educators attends the Distinguished Schools Award ceremony in Sacramento, where Quincy Elementary School received the prestigious award. From left: teacher Yvonne Casalnuovo, Director of Outdoor Education Rob Wade, teacher Nancy Sipe, State Superintendent of Schools Tom Torlakson, Superintendent Micheline Miglis, Principal Kristy Warren and PUSD board president Chris Russell. Ul ncy ngui More than 500 students and administrators representing 125 schools in the state of California convened in Sacramento on Monday, June 9, for the Distinguished Schools Award ceremony and luncheon. Among the celebrated recipients was Quincy Elementary School. The award is given to those schools that maximize their instruction and resources to meet the needs of underrepresented subgroups in schools. Schools must present their practices as part of the application process. If chosen, the school is visited by a state-approved validation team that observes the practices in action and verifies the impact on student learning through observations and interviews with teachers and students. Quincy Elementary School was chosen based on its comprehensive application that highlighted the school's signature practices: place-based learning and differentiated instruction. Plumas Unified School District board pre'sident Chris Russell, Superintendent Micheline Miglis and Director of Student Performance Ed Thompson joined Principal Kristy Warren, Director of Outdoor Education Rob Wade and teachers Nancy Sipe and Yvonne Casalnuovo for the special event. The essence of Quincy Elementary School's success is captured in the following excerpt from its application: "Our school site has an incredible setting, with Boyle's Creek running along the north side of the campus. The campus rests at the base of Claremont Peak, with many walking field trips taken to Boyle's Ravine in the fall and spring months. "From this setting, we thrive with a rich outdoor education program, complete with an outdoor classroom and a sixth-grade capstone watershed education course. "During the V m-m months, students in kindergarten - sixth grade can be found learning in the outdoor classroom, walking along the nature trail that lines the northern border of our campus or participating in learning opportunities through our local community garden, adjacent to the south side classrooms. "Academic success is achieved through differentiated instruction in guided reading groups, frequent monitoring of student achievement through a comprehensive formative assessment plan, analysis of best practices through Monday collaborations, and a team approach to student success, including all support staff." Cemetery tour Saturday: The ghosts of Johnsville walking tour of some of the are ready to greet the Plumas historical homes still left in County Museum the town. Association-sponsored tour The tour will wind up at of the Johnsville Cemetery 4"30 p.m. at the Iron Door on Saturday, June 28. Restaurant, where owner The fun begins at 2:30 p.m. Chris David and his culinary at the Johnsville Cemetery. crew will present a selection Museum Director Scott of their renowned appetizers Lawson will talk briefly and libations as a fitting closg about the history of to the event. Johnsville, nearby Jam/son This event is a fundraiser City and some of the families hosted by the museum interred in the cemetery, association to help keep the Local actors Tina Terrazas museum's doors open since it: and Bob Shipp will lost county funding. impersonate various Tickets are available at the denizens of the graveyard. Quincy museum, 283-6320, at After visiting the cemetery, Carey Candy Co. or from David Daun of the Johnsville museum trustees. Historical Society will give a For more information or guided tour of the restored tickets call Don Clark at Catholic church as well as a 836-2586. Seniors earn $185,000 in awards Principal Sue Segnra announced statistics related to the Quincy High School senior awards ceremony that took place June 5: ---$28,500 in scholarships were provided by local community organizations to QHS seniors. --17 seniors out of a class of 45, 38 percent, received at least one scholarship. -.ln addition to the local scholarships, seniors received at least $156,500 in scholarships from colleges and universities. -Students were also recognized for academic achievements such as AP Scholar, Golden State Seal Merit Diploma (based on California Standards Test scores) and California Scholarship Federation membership. II