Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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July 18, 2012     Feather River Bulletin
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July 18, 2012
 

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IOA Wednesday, July 18, 2012 Feather River Bulletin Market continues giveaway Lee's Produce has been donating beautiful produce baskets every week for the Quincy Farmers' Market prize giveaway. Photo submitted Shoppers can look for- ward to hearing Toboggan Squad at this Thursday's Quincy Farmers' Market. This is a youthful and tal- ented group of musicians: Chris and Nathan Retal- lack, Keely Nesbit and friends. In their own words, they play "whatever the folk we want!" The Market Committee has launched a popular new prize drawing this year. Customers who pur- chase food or handcrafted goods from vendors can en- ter into the free drawing for goods and services from local businesses and grow- ers. Tickets are drawn at 6 p.m. and customers need to be present to win. Past prizes have included fresh produce, gift certificates for dinner, handmade goat milk soaps and a random orbital buffer. Find a photo album of past prizes at facebook.com/quincyfm. Twin Maflressess S9 9 from .... . ................ ,.. Queen Mattressess s299 from .......................... Englander "Duchess" Pillowtop !o Year Warranty Full Set,  ........... Integrated Call Support ...................................... system Queen Set,  ........................................... Englander "Crown" Pillowtop I0 Year Warranty Integrated Coil Support System Queen Set,  .......................................... s448 Englander "Mediterranean" Luxury Firm ;s Year worronty Queen Set : ............. Integrated Call Support .......................... Syslem King Set ........................................................... Bea utyrest " E agleville" 10 Year Warranty. Twin Set,  ............................................... , Individual Muslin Full Set,  .............. 1 Pocketed Coils. Motion .................................... Seporotlon for Queen Set,  ........................................... UndlsrbedSleep King Set..fl,, ............................... : ..............  Beautyrest "Maggie" Eurotop Plush 10 Year Warranty. Individual Muslin Pocketed Coils. Motion Queen Set Separation for ..................................................... " H Undisturbed Sleep King Set ..... r ................................................... s1199 Beautyrest "Lisette" Plus Firm 10 Year Warranty. Individual Muslin Pocketed Coils. Motion Separation fo r Undisturbed Sleep Queen Set ................................................... S146g Comforpedic M.mo,y,oom.,,,, Air Cool Sleep System. 25 year limited warranty. Queen Set ................................................... $17gg . :::: : .: ::  .... over 200 Maggresses sgoc00, NO INTEREST WITH PAYMENTS FOR 6 MONTHS!* Deputy involved in shooting identified Dan McDonald Staff Writer dmcdonald@plumasnews.com The Plumas County Sher. iff's Office has released the name of the deputy who fatal- ly shot an armed man June 19 at the Evergreen Trailer and RV Park near Quincy. Deputy Tom Froggatt fired the shots that killed Dennis Jason William Majewski, ac- cording to the Plumas Coun- ty sheriff and district attor- ney. Froggatt, a seven-year veteran of the sheriff's department, was placed on administrative leave follow- ing the shooting. The leave is standard pro- cedure for officers involved in a shooting, according to the department. Froggatt was cleared to return to field duty July 1. According to District At- torney David Hollister, the investigation into the events surrounding the shooting, and the subsequent fire that destroyed Majewski's trailer, is ongoing. Hollister said the investi- gation's findings are expect- ed to be released at the end of the month. Missing motorcyclist found near Yuba Pass Dan McDonald Staff Writer ' drncdonald@plumasnews.com A motorcyclist who was killed in a Crash on Highway 49 near Yuba Pass on Sunday has been identified by the California Highway Patrol as Mike Casselberry, 41, of Nevada City. Casselberry, who was re- ported missing Sunday night after he failed to arrive in Sierra City, was found dead Monday morning. Sierra County Search and Rescue personnel discovered Casselberry's body and the wreckage of his Harley Davidson near Yuba Pass on Highway 49 about 9 a.m. According to published re- ports, Casselberry and his ff- ther were on a motorcycle ride when they became sepa- rated. Casselberry's family and friends reportedly launched a search that was led by the Sierra County Sheriff's De- partment. The CHP reported that Cas- selberry failed to negotiate a curve and veered off the road. Casselberry went over an embankment and hit a tree before colliding with large boulders about 33 feet below the roadway. JAIL, from page 1A many of the urban counties are already seeing. Our inmate population is chang- ing," District Attorney David Hollister said. "We have peo- ple in our jail who ordinarily ought to be in prison. "There is just a heightened level of safety, v Hollister said. "Our arraignment to- day (July 11) involves an in- mate that has threatened to kill a jailer." Hollister said, "It's been remarkable that our sheriffs office has been able to keep the jail afloat -- basically bringing people in off the street to try and flu these (of- ficer) shifts." Hagwood said his office has been hiring part-time of- ricers to work at the jail. Making more room Assistant Sheriff Dean Canalia said the county is us- ing electronic monitoring (ankle bracelets) that allows non-violent inmates to serve some of their sentence out- side of the jail. He said five people are cur- rently wearing the bracelets outside of the jail. He said he hoped to use electronic moni- toring to reduce the jail pop- ulation from the current 37 inmates to 33 in the next few weeks. "Our goal right now is to decrease the population so beds can be open by Aug. 1 for flash incarceration." Flash incarceration The term "flash incarcera- tion" is used to describe the process of sending parole vi- olators back to jail. Because the jail is full, parolees and people on pro- bation know they can break the rules and commit minor crimes without the threat of returning to jail. "Basically, right now we have a class of people that have been released from prison. Ordinarily they would be on parole. But they are now on post-release com- munity supervision under our probation department's supervision," Hollister said. He said intermediate steps could be taken if someone breaks the terms of their post-release supervision. For example, a person who takes drugs or drinks alcohol could be ordered to attend substance-abuse meetings. "If those steps fail, the idea is that the probation officer can then arrest them, bring them to jail, and they can be housed for up to 10 days." Alternative sentencing and evaluation Under the direction of Pub- lic Health Director Mimi Hall, the county is in the process of reinstituting an al- cohol and drug program. With the help of the coun- ty's mental health director, Pat Leslie, the county plans to provide judges with the option of rendering split sen- tences. Judges are currently forced, in many cases, to sen- tence drug offenders and peo- ple with mental health issues to jail. Often people who commit- ted crimes would be better served by receiving assis- tance to address substance abuse or mental health is- sues. Leslie said her office hired a person who will begin work Sept. 1. She said the person would be doing as- sessments on non-violent in- mates to determine if they could be eligible for drug and alcohol or mental health ser- vices instead of incarcera- tion. Hall said the plan is to ex- pand the program as the ser- vices are put into place. "We will have the capacity to try' to do the type of assess- ments that we have been talking about," Hall said. "We will try to determine, 'What services does this per- son need? What category do they fall in?'" Superior Court Judge Ira Kaufman said providing op- tions other than jail is essen- tial. "It's a very simple equa- tion: If somebody's in cus- tody, our goal is to get them out of custody as soon as it's appropriate," Kaufman said. "If we can do that then (the jail) crisis is lessened, be- cause we are getting the less- violent, less-dangerous peo- ple out of custody :.. and keeping in custody people who really need to be there and should be there." Q, from page 1A Monday - Friday, July 23 - 27: Vacation Bible School, 9 - 11:30 a.m., First Baptist Church of Quincy at 74 Reese St. in East Quincy. Open to ages 5 years through 12th grade; featuring LifeWay's Amazing Wonders Aviation theme. For information: Elizabeth, 283-4019; Lois, 283-2792. k