Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
Lyft
September 7, 2016     Feather River Bulletin
PAGE 29     (29 of 36 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 29     (29 of 36 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
September 7, 2016
 

Newspaper Archive of Feather River Bulletin produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2017. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2016 15B A final word on those Olympic ads Itold myself that I was done with the subject. Enough with writing about the Rio Olympics and the parade of commercial messages that steer us to food and beverage choices that are wrong for us, while facilitating a disconnect between what nutrition experts and the public perceive to be healthful foods. Then it happened. A commercial featuring a smiling family with two perfect little children seemingly celebrating the moment with their meal df chicken nuggets; right in sync with the emotional tone of the sporting accomplishment that preceded it immediately followed an absolutely exhilarating moment of Olympic triumph on the TV screen. A marketer would call it brilliant. The idea for these ads is to reach not just the adults, but young children especially and to create an emotional attachment to the product that is featured. Accomplish that, and you have a customer for life. This effort goes far beyond mere commercials. Think of all those shots of the Olympic Village, especially those constantly repeated panning shots down the long line of athletes queued up to get into the Village McDonald's. Does this not fit neatly in line with the notion that the road to Olympic glory is indeed paved with chicken nuggets? Might they also be trying to send a message that we can outrun the calories taken while visiting this fast food giant? What most folks may not know is that there are few alternative food choices in the Village. And even nutritionlsts will tell you that there's nothing wrong with eating a little junk food after many months of disciplined eating in preparation for an event; that is, when the event is over. And perhaps the biggest incentive: the food at this particular McDonald's is free for all Olympic athletes and coaches (another brilliant stroke of marketing). And there is no need to pick exclusively on McDonald's. According to a 2006 study, the average kid in the United States will see an average of 4,000 food-related advertisements per year. A whopping 98 percent of those ads are for food high in fat, sugar or sodium. We are in the midst of a major public health crisis as it relates to things kids eat. And it should be no surprise to anyone that children are extremely vulnerable to advertising and that advertising plays a major role in this public health crisis. Ads sway kids' preferences. Star athletes spokespeople sway kids' preferences. When children are exposed to advertisements for unhealthy food, they will in turn consume significantly unhealthier rather than healthy calories as a result. Younger children especially appear to be among the most susceptible to the impact of food and beverage marketing in terms of quantity and quality of calories consumed. So says a recent McMaster University study that examined the effects of unhealthy food and beverage marketing, caloric intake, and dietary preference among more than 6,000 children. Another new study from researchers at the University of Kansas Medical Center shows that the food advertisements actually may change the area of the brain that controls how much children are apt to desire sugary cereals, candy and fast food. C-FORCE HEALTH AND FITNESS CHUCK NORRIS info@creators.com The results of the study, published in the Journal of Pediatrics, indicated that during the food commercials there was more activity in the portion of the brain that "encodes values and desires" than was observed during non-food advertising. This creates an imbalance between the desire for unhealthy foods and the discipline needed to rein in the cravings to maintain a healthy diet. This news may be new, but it's hardly surprising. For years, nutrition experts have been calling for an end to junk food sponsorship at the games. The problem is, it seems that every time federal agencies advocated for changes to food-commercial regulations, industry lobbyists pushed back, and legislators ultimately side with the food companies. In 2008, the Federal Trade Commission presented a report to Congress revealing that food and drink companies were spending $1.6 billion every year targeting children. After multiple policymakers signed letters urging the manufacturers to serf-regulate, spending on child-focused ads dropped 20 percent by 2012. But since then, there has been no follow up report, effectively ending oversight of junk food marketing. At the supply end of things, it's just as bad. According to a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine, there remains a major disconnect between the nation's agricultural policies and nutritional recommendations. Federal policy tells us to fill 50 percent of our plates with fruits and vegetables. At the same time, federal farm subsidies focus on fmancing the production of corn, soybeans, wheat, rice, sorghum, dairy and livestock. According to the New York Times, the U.S. devotes less than 1 percent of farm subsidies to support the research, production and marketing of fruits and vegetables. NBC's parent company, Comcast, paid $12 billion for exclusive Olympics broadcast rights to the games in the U.S. through 2032. They need to focus on their return on this investment. I get it. According to the marketing magazine Campaign, in 2012 McDonald's (which has sponsored the Olympics since 1976) paid $98 million to extend its Olympic partnership until 2020. But as new studies suggest, there is a fundamental ethical question that needs to be addressed about marketing unhealthy foods to children particularly when we know that there's a significant proportion of the population, both adults and kids, that struggle with carrying excess weight and with obesity. Meanwhile, others have taken to calling these Olympics a "carnival of junk food marketing." I hope Congress is listening. Write to Chuck Norris (info@crmtors.com) with your ques~ons about hml~ and fitness. Copyright 2015 chuck Norris Distributed by .creators.corn F m m m m m B m m mmm I m m SENIOR Wednesday, Sept. 14 Chef salad, mixed fruit,| IVI. NU french roll, ice cream Monday, Sept. 12 | Soft fish tacos, black bean | salad, cantaloupe Thursday, Sept. 15 Roast beef, carrots and pota-| toes, orange slices, whole| wheat roll | Tuesday, Sept. 13 Friday, Sept. 16 | * Cheese lasagna, spinach "Egg salad sandwich, bean| orange salad, apricots, salad, sliced tomatoes, sliced " | whole grain roll pineapple I * Jegetarian Meal; **Healthy Heart Meal I, ***This em's m en n vflr L000 mg of Sodium ......... I site .' he;ter, 394-7636; Quincy, - ; Greenville, |284:6608 (day before for reservation); Portola, 832-4173; Blairsden | -open Wed. only, call 832-4173 Tuesday for reservations. Suggested - | donation $2.50 for 60 yrs & older. One guest may accompany each I senior, $6 mandatory charge. Menus may change. Noon at all sites. a- m m m, m m m .. m m m m, m, ,dl Chester: Nelson Veterinary Service offers low cost rabies, distemper, cat vaccines and more at annual reduced-price vaccination clinic, 131 Stone Ave., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Rabies clinic: $8/shot. Dogs on leashes and cats in carriers. For information, call 258-7264. Vulnerability of Aging Forum with Anne Gaudet, 10 - 11:30 a.m., Wildwood Village. Workshop invites participants to take look at how they feel about the aging process: any fears and resistan@s,they have; cultural and media.influences; how to open up to ways that support aging with kindness, curiosity, acceptance and humor. A support group will be established following the workshop based on attendee's interest. For information, contact Anne Gaudet, 283-6358, or annegaudet@live.com. Greenville: Indian Creek Vetednary Clinic offers low cost rabies, distemper, cat vaccines and more at annual reduced-price vaccination clinic at Evergreen Market parking lot, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m. Rabies clinic: $8/shot. Plumas County Animal Control will also be there to provide one-stop licensing services. Dogs on leashes and cats in ' carriers, For information, call 284-6187. Portola: Story Time at Portola Lil'~rary with Plumas County Sheriff Krissy Ross volunteering to read stories! A stick puppet will be created following the stories. The program is held the first Wednesday of each month, 10:30 - 11:30 a.m., through May 2017. Quincy: Plumas County Fire Safe Council holds meeting, 9 - 11 a.m., Plumas County Planning & Building Services office, 555 Main St. For questions regarding activities of the Plumas County Fire Safe Council, or information about the upcoming meeting, contact Hannah at 283-3739. Free and open to public. Final Quincy Certified FarmersMarket, 4:30 - 7:30 p.m., Dame Shirley Plaza. Vendors offer local produce, handcrafts, delicious prepared food and two prize gifts every week. Live music by The Back 40. For information, visit QuincyFarmersMarket.org. Chester: Two artists will display their works at Back Room Art Gallery, in Books & Beyond, 140 Main St., through the month of September. Photographer Barbara Jackson and painter Mary Jane Bagshaw will discuss their work with Visitors during a reception at gallery, 4 - 7p.m. Greenhorn: Friday Night 8BQ, Greenhorn Creek Guest Ranch, 2116 Greenhorn Ranch Rd. All you can eat 8BQ, 5 - 8:30 p.m. Entertainment and activities. Ribs and chicken, coleslaw, baked beans, potato salad, garlic bread, brownies. Wagon rides, horseshoes, .fishing, swimming, dancing, bonfire sing-a-long. Adults: $23, 6-15: $1125, 3-5: $2.25, kids under 3 eat free. Veggie kabobs or salmon available with reservations. Reservations appreciated, 283-0930, greenhomranch.com Antelope Lake: 2016 Plumas National Forest Children's Fishing Derby, 8 a.m. - noon, Antelope Lake, Lost Cove boat ramp. Free family fun; kids 15 and under invited. Fishing contests, prizes, arts and crafts, educational and cultural activities, snacks, prizes. Non-motorized boats only during derby. For information, call 283-0555, Jennifer Ready, 283-7828, or visit fs.usda.gov/plumas. Calpine: Sixth annual Calpine Marketplace, Calpine Park, 131 County Rd., 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Arts and crafts, classic car show and shine, BBQ, beer and wine garden, live music, bake sale, kid's corner with prizes. SEPT 13 Chester: Almanor Recreation and Park District sponsors 30th annual Street Rod Extravaganza car show in Chester Park, 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. Entrants are encouraged to sign up early for early bird discounts. Cars, trucks and motorcycles are welcome to join the show and awards ceremony. Enjoy Poker Run around the take, Poker Walk in Chester, DJ Chatter all Day, evening street dance with live band, no host drinks and no host food. For information, visit yourARPD.org or call ARPD office,'258-2562, "[uesday/Thursday, 9 a.m. - 2 p.m., or call Michelle Gosney, 519-3879 to volunteer or for information. Rotary Club of.Chester, American Legion and ' Boy Scout Troop No. 36 sponsor pancake breakfast at Chester Memorial Hall, 8 - 11 a.m. Pancakes, ham, eggs, coffee and juice will be served for $7. Proceeds benefit the scout troop. For information, call 258-3212. Downieville: Antique Bottles, Collectibles Show, and Sale, Downieville School gym, Highway 49. $10 for early lookers: 8 - 10 a.m.; free admittance, 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free drawing ticket included. For information, call Rick and Cherry Simi, 283-3659 or ricksimi@att.net: Lake Almanor: Lake Almanor Ducks Unlimited Banquet at Lake Almanor Country Club Restaurant, 5 -10 p.m. Buy tickets early; every year a sellout! A fun-filled evening with prime ribdinner, lots of games, raffles and auctions. For information, call Brian, 258-5000, or visit ducks.org/california/events. Greenville: Awana Clubs Kid's Club, Tuesday nights, 6 p.m. Greenville Southern Baptist Church, 241 Wolf Creek Road. For information, call Commander Scott Abrams at 284-7331. Portola: Vulnerability of Aging Forum with Anne Gaudet, 10:30- 11 :.30 a.m., Portola Vets Hall. Workshop invites participants to take look at how they feelabout the aging process: any fears and resistances they have; cultural and media influences; howto open up to ways that support aging wit~ ~ndness, curiosity, acceptance and humor. A support group will be established following the workshop based on attendee's interest. For information, contact Anne Gaudet, 283-6358, or annegaudet@live,com. Taylorsville: Forest Service hosts open house to share information about Moonlight fire area restoration projects being proposed by Mt. Hough Ranger District, 5 -7 p.m., Taylorsville Community Grange. Chester. Awana Clubs Kid's Club, Wednesday nights, 6 p.m. Chester Baptist Church, 210 Myrtle St. For information, call 258-2394 or facebook.com/chesterbaptistchurch. Quincy: , Portola: Ninth annual Wild and Scenic Film Festival Eastern Plumas Health Care hosts Health and hosted by Plumas Arts at Town Hall Theatre. Wellness Fair & PSREC's Community Expo at Evening includes nine inspiring films, food, Plumas-Sierra REC annual member meeting, drinks and a fantastic prize drawing. Doors PSREC, 73233 H ighway 70, 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $12 at door, $10 in Free diabetes, BMI and blood pressure advance at Quincy Natural Foods and the screenings. Plumas Arts gallery or buy online at Quincy: plumasarts.org. TnT: Tacos and Tequila, 4 - 8 p.m., at Eastside American Yalley Animal Hospital offers low Public House, 176ffE'. Main S~).Te~ila tastin~ ..... /' " '~ ' " cost rabies,, distemper, cat vacGmes arid more wine tasting, taco bar, prizes, salsa-tastin~ at anfiual reduced-price vaccinationclinic, 77 competition. All proceeds benefit the National Alta Ave., 3 -= 5 p.m. Rabies clinic: $8/shot. Multiple Sclerosis Society. For information, call Dogs on leashes and cats in carriers. For Kim Carroll, 249-2307. information, call 283-4500. 1 lhu sEpT15 Beckwourth: Portola Rotary will be hosting the 35th annual Fly-In Pancake Breakfast at Nervino Airport, 8 - 11 a.m. All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast, with eggs, sausage links, coffee, juice and a special gin fizz booth. Various children's activities such as a free bounce house and aviary flights of fancy such as Young Eagles program and free flights for children ages 8 to 17. Tickets $10 for adults, $6 for children 12 and under, available day of event. For information, call Kirk Lambert at 251-3815. Quincy: Forest Service hosts open house to share information about Moonlight fire area restoration projects being proposed by Mt. Hough Ranger District, 4 - 7 p.m., Serpilio Hall, Plumas Sierra'County Fairgrounds. fd SEI 16 Quincy: Old Fashioned Family Picnic, 12:30- 3:30 p.m., Gansner Park, a gift of community service from the congregation of Our Savior Lutheran Church. Balloon twisting, face painting, goodies and prizes for everyone. Free BBQ of hot dogs, burgers, salad, watermelon, cupcakes and cold drinks. There will be moment of prayer for all 9/11 victims in remembrance. RSVP required, reserve your spot today. Call Leslie Wall at Community Connections, 283-3611, ext. "818 or Iwall@plumasruralservices.org. Quincy: Vulnerability of Aging Forum with Anne Gaudet, 9:30 - 11:30 a.m., Quincy Vets Hall. Workshop invites participants to take look at how they feel about the aging process: any fears and resistances they have; cultural and media influences; how to open up to ways that support aging with kindness, curiosity, acceptance and humor. A support group will be established following the workshop based on attendee's interest. For information, contact Anne Gaudet, 283-6358, or annegaudet@live.com. Greenhorn: Friday Night BBQ, Greenhorn Creek Guest Ranch, 2116 Greenhorn Ranch Rd. All you can eat BBQ, 5 -' 8:30 p.m. Entertainment and activities. Ribs and chicken, coleslaw, baked beans, potato salad, garlic bread, brownies. Wagon rides, horseshoes, fishing, swimming, dancing, bonfire sing-a-long. Adults: $23, 6-15:$11.25, 3-5: $2.25, kids under 3 eat free. Veggie kabobsor salmon available with reservations. Reservations appreciated, 283-0930, greenhornranch.com. Lake Almanor: Carol's Caf~ & Deli, 2932 Almanor Dr. West, on the shore of Lake Almanor at Prattville, is sponsoring a five-course tasting menu to raise funds for Almanor Basin Food Pantry in Chester; with two seatings: 5 p.ml and 7 p.m. Reservations are require& There will be live music and a silent auction. $55 percouple or $30 per person. All proceeds donated to food pantry program. Call 259-2464 to make reservations. Portola: Eastern Plumas Hospital Auxiliary sponsors blood drive, from 2 - 5:45 p.m., at Portola Station Baptist Church, 171 S. Gulling St. As a "thank you" for donating blood, United Blood Services will perform a total cholesterol test on each donor's sample. For appointment, visit BloodHero.com. For information, contact Pandora Valle, 832-0347, or Terry Williams, 801-921-9314.