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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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November 19, 2014
 

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Hospital employees prepare for Ebola --Page 2A Horse and rider hit by truck -- Page 7A Vol. 148, No. 15 www.plumasnews.com 530-283,0800 Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 5O PerspectiVe:Working ilil discussions mean your :: local government is working effectively./ !: Page 9B !i Whole lotta shakin' ,i! goin' on - Scientists are tracking a swarm of ! earthquakes northwest i of Chester./Page 14B i Five-peat - Feather i! River College's :!!:: volleyball team captures ilii another conference title i:!! i with a 10-0 record./ ::i ::::i:: .... Page .1C iii Today: League of Women Voters of Plumas County meeting, 6 p.m., Plumas County Library. Guest speaker Director of Mental Health Peter Livingston answers questions about recent focus groups, public meetings on county mental health services. For information: Kathy Pricel 283-1195. Tomorrow: Book in Common event, 12:15 - 1 p.m., the Gallery at Feather River College. Tom Heaney presents history of Nazi Germany in 1930s - 1940s, as portrayed in setting for "The Book Thief." Free; open to all. "Trail Stewards of the Lost Sierra" screening, 7 p.m., Town Hall Theatre. Local documentary focuses on Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Seating limited. Tickets free for volunteers working with SBTS on Nov. 15 Mount Hough Trail Day; $5 for others. Saturday: Waffle breakfast, 8 - 10 a.m., Feather River Grange Hall. For Surprise visitor A northern pygmy owl rests on the ground in Sherri McConnell's Quincy yard. McConnell found the bird Tuesday morning, Nov. 11, and helped it fly away. According to Plumas Audubon Society Executive Director David Arsenault, the owl may have hit a window and been stunned. "Or it may have aten too much and was just digesting. This actually happens a lot this time of year when birds are migrating and there is a lot of food around," said Arsenault. "The majority of the time that people think that birds are injured they actually are just fine so it is generally best just to let them be." Obvious injuries, like a gunshot wound, .... poisoning or a broken wing, may'varrnt a c:arest wildlife rehabilitation center: Bidwell Rehab Center i/:lco, 343-9004; Lake Tahoe Wildlife Caren,Soufli  :. 577-2273; or Wildlife Rescue Foundation in Sparks, Nevada, 775-284-WILD. Photo by Sherri McConnell , , *\\; :1: : i :: : "  I Hospital hopes to see more patients Financial forecast calls for growth Debra Moore Staff Writer dmoore@plumasnews.com From the new chief financial officer to the chief executive officer, Plumas District Hospital officials sounded a familiar theme during the Nov. 5 board of directors meeting -- the hospital and clinics need to see more patients. "What drives us is volume; without volume we won't be here," said Ron Telles, the hospital's new chief financial officer. "Our operating expenses are static; we're running pretty lean," said Chief Executive Officer Dr. Jeff Kepple. "Success is in growth." So it's fortuitous that growth is in the f'mancial forecast. Swing beds, more orthopedi c procedures and See PDH, page 4A Helping hands Volunteers get ready to dig in to the earth around the Learning Landscapes Barn on Leonhardt Ranch off Quincy Junction Road on Nov. 8. Members of the Quincy Rotary Club and the Feather River Land Trust worked alongside Quincy High School students, helping finish the barn. Rotarians worked on leveling gravel and topsoil to help in the landscaping efforts of the nearly complete project. Photos submitted information: John, 927-8879. Women of Worship presentation, 10 - 11:30 a.m., First Baptist Church at 74 Reese St. Victoria Shea, Ph.D., speaks on supporting those dealing with loss. Includes refreshments. For information: 283-9943. Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, 5 - 7:30 p.m., Quincy High School cafeteria. QHS S-Club hosts free dinner open to all community members. To subscribe to the Bulletin, call 530-283-0800 College considers bachelor's degrees James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Feather River College may soon offer bachelor's degrees. This was the hope and talk of the board of trustees, Superintendent-President Kevin Trutna and Dean of Education Derek Lerch at the trustees' regular board meeting Nov. 13. FRC plans to compete with 71 other community college districts in the state for the chance to be one of 15 junior colleges offering a bachelor's degree program. On Sept. 29, Gov. Jerry Brown passed into law a pilot program allowing up to 15 community colleges to offer four-year degrees in a limited manner. Courses cannot be duplicated with any in the University of California or the California State University systems. Degrees will have to be technical in nature, and fill a regional workforce need. In addition, each college will be allowed to offer only one four-year program. To date, California community colleges have only been allowed to offer two-year associate degrees and vocational certificates. Inclusion in the pilot program includes several factors. Colleges submitting proposals must show evidence of workforce demand, local interest, lack of program duplication in California's other higher learning systems, funding sources, adequate facilities and equipment, and institutional support. The board discussed two degree programs that could meet all the criteria -- equine and ranch management, and watershed restoration. The college already excels in both See FRC, page 5A ! Hospital employees prepare for Ebola --Page 2A Horse and rider hit by truck -- Page 7A Vol. 148, No. 15 www.plumasnews.com 530-283,0800 Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 5O PerspectiVe:Working ilil discussions mean your :: local government is working effectively./ !: Page 9B !i Whole lotta shakin' ,i! goin' on - Scientists are tracking a swarm of ! earthquakes northwest i of Chester./Page 14B i Five-peat - Feather i! River College's :!!:: volleyball team captures ilii another conference title i:!! i with a 10-0 record./ ::i ::::i:: .... Page .1C iii Today: League of Women Voters of Plumas County meeting, 6 p.m., Plumas County Library. Guest speaker Director of Mental Health Peter Livingston answers questions about recent focus groups, public meetings on county mental health services. For information: Kathy Pricel 283-1195. Tomorrow: Book in Common event, 12:15 - 1 p.m., the Gallery at Feather River College. Tom Heaney presents history of Nazi Germany in 1930s - 1940s, as portrayed in setting for "The Book Thief." Free; open to all. "Trail Stewards of the Lost Sierra" screening, 7 p.m., Town Hall Theatre. Local documentary focuses on Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship. Seating limited. Tickets free for volunteers working with SBTS on Nov. 15 Mount Hough Trail Day; $5 for others. Saturday: Waffle breakfast, 8 - 10 a.m., Feather River Grange Hall. For Surprise visitor A northern pygmy owl rests on the ground in Sherri McConnell's Quincy yard. McConnell found the bird Tuesday morning, Nov. 11, and helped it fly away. According to Plumas Audubon Society Executive Director David Arsenault, the owl may have hit a window and been stunned. "Or it may have aten too much and was just digesting. This actually happens a lot this time of year when birds are migrating and there is a lot of food around," said Arsenault. "The majority of the time that people think that birds are injured they actually are just fine so it is generally best just to let them be." Obvious injuries, like a gunshot wound, .... poisoning or a broken wing, may'varrnt a c:arest wildlife rehabilitation center: Bidwell Rehab Center i/:lco, 343-9004; Lake Tahoe Wildlife Caren,Soufli  :. 577-2273; or Wildlife Rescue Foundation in Sparks, Nevada, 775-284-WILD. Photo by Sherri McConnell , , *\\; :1: : i :: : "  I Hospital hopes to see more patients Financial forecast calls for growth Debra Moore Staff Writer dmoore@plumasnews.com From the new chief financial officer to the chief executive officer, Plumas District Hospital officials sounded a familiar theme during the Nov. 5 board of directors meeting -- the hospital and clinics need to see more patients. "What drives us is volume; without volume we won't be here," said Ron Telles, the hospital's new chief financial officer. "Our operating expenses are static; we're running pretty lean," said Chief Executive Officer Dr. Jeff Kepple. "Success is in growth." So it's fortuitous that growth is in the f'mancial forecast. Swing beds, more orthopedi c procedures and See PDH, page 4A Helping hands Volunteers get ready to dig in to the earth around the Learning Landscapes Barn on Leonhardt Ranch off Quincy Junction Road on Nov. 8. Members of the Quincy Rotary Club and the Feather River Land Trust worked alongside Quincy High School students, helping finish the barn. Rotarians worked on leveling gravel and topsoil to help in the landscaping efforts of the nearly complete project. Photos submitted information: John, 927-8879. Women of Worship presentation, 10 - 11:30 a.m., First Baptist Church at 74 Reese St. Victoria Shea, Ph.D., speaks on supporting those dealing with loss. Includes refreshments. For information: 283-9943. Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, 5 - 7:30 p.m., Quincy High School cafeteria. QHS S-Club hosts free dinner open to all community members. To subscribe to the Bulletin, call 530-283-0800 College considers bachelor's degrees James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Feather River College may soon offer bachelor's degrees. This was the hope and talk of the board of trustees, Superintendent-President Kevin Trutna and Dean of Education Derek Lerch at the trustees' regular board meeting Nov. 13. FRC plans to compete with 71 other community college districts in the state for the chance to be one of 15 junior colleges offering a bachelor's degree program. On Sept. 29, Gov. Jerry Brown passed into law a pilot program allowing up to 15 community colleges to offer four-year degrees in a limited manner. Courses cannot be duplicated with any in the University of California or the California State University systems. Degrees will have to be technical in nature, and fill a regional workforce need. In addition, each college will be allowed to offer only one four-year program. To date, California community colleges have only been allowed to offer two-year associate degrees and vocational certificates. Inclusion in the pilot program includes several factors. Colleges submitting proposals must show evidence of workforce demand, local interest, lack of program duplication in California's other higher learning systems, funding sources, adequate facilities and equipment, and institutional support. The board discussed two degree programs that could meet all the criteria -- equine and ranch management, and watershed restoration. The college already excels in both See FRC, page 5A !