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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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November 19, 2014
 

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, Feather River Bulletin Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 9A Landowners, conservation service partner to strengthen forest health P James Wilson Staff Writer jw Ison@p umasnews.com i: ': The residents of Butterfly :: Valley can sleep a little easier ; at night, without as much ' worry of their property catching fire. Many landowners in the valley i] partnered with the Natural ' Resource Conservation Service to reduce the threat of wildfire and restore the health of the forest on their property. NRCS' Dan Martynn, along with forest-restoration advocate William Jacks, led a group around Butterfly Valley on Nov. 7, highlighting the fuel reduction work that has been done to the area. In addition to highlighting area work that has been done on private land, Plumas National Forest Mt. Hough District Ranger Mike Donald and fire ecologist David Kinateder presented information on the planned Butterfly Valley-Twain Project to reduce fuels around the residential area. NRCS helped several residents reduce the risk of fire by providing technical and financial assistance. Landowners signed up for the Environmental Quality "Our overall goal is to build resilient forests." David Kinateder Fire Ecologist Plumas National Forest Incentives Program through NRCS. NRCS and the landowners developed plans for their areas, the landowners got to work on cleaning up the forest on their property, and NRCS reimbursed the landowners for their work. The partnership resulted in lower forest -- and thus fuel -- density. Martynn and Jacks led the walk, showing examples of what private forest lands in Plumas County can look like when cleared. Theysaid fire danger had been reduced dramatically. In addition to showing cleared lands, the two led the group on Plumas National Forest land that borders the private property to show what an overgrown forest looks like. Dead trees and crowded saplings frilled the forest. In their presentation on the proposed Butterfly Valley-Twain project, Donald and Kinateder addressed the overgrowth in Plumas National Forest. "I know this is an area that needs treatment," said Donald. "Together we can be consistent and make it a fire-safe area." Kinateder spoke of the Forest Service's past focus on suppression rather than prevention. With the aid of a graph, he demonstrated a trend of fires in the area. Since the Forest Service began in 1905, forest fires have remained at a minimum. In the last decade, however, the forests have seen more high-impact fires than ever before. If that trend continues, the next decade will be even worse. Kinateder stressed the importance of prevention. "We need to adapt. Our overall goal is to build resilient forests." The proposed project will cover around 4,000 acres. The Mt. Hough Ranger District plans to hold a public meeting on the project sometime in early December. The location and date was undecided at the time of writing. Private landowners who are interested in applying for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program can contact Martynn at 283-7511. Five-year plan raises questions about services district's future James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Quincy Community Services District general manager Larry Sullivan presented a five-year caPtalLrnprovment plan at the district's regular meeting Nov. 13. The plan spurred a heavy discussion about the future of the district before the board approved the plan. "I'm just a little frustrated with where the district is going," said board member Richard Castaldini. "I don't have a good picture of what we need to run this plant." Two major issues Castaldini had with the plan both dealt with cost-heavy projects. Tentatively scheduled for the 2015-16 fiscal year is a berm project with an estimated cost of $700,000. The other cost-heavy project, scheduled on the plan for the 2018-19 year, is a $4 million filtration and UV disinfection project. The berm project needs to be completed for the district's wastewater treatment plant to comply with a state order. The filtration and UV disinfection project would upgrade the plant so chemicals and bleach would no longer be used to treat wastewater. Castaldini's main concern was whether or not the projects are the best fit for the district. Board member Denny Churchill reminded the board that approval of the plan wouldn't mean the projects would be etched in stone. A five-year plan approved from the board was necessary, however, to qualify for certain grants. "A feasibility study could answer 97 percent of our questions," Churchill went on. "We need a defmitive study of what is best for this valley." The district has tossed about the idea of ordering a feasibility study for years. Prior disagreement with the other district in the valley, the East Quincy Services District, was one of the main holdups that prevented QCSD from forging ahead with the study. The climate surrounding the disagreement has cooled recently, however, as members from both districts have been working together in a wastewater treatment rate committee. "I think both districts are fmally starting to realize that we're all in this same leaky little boat together," said Churchill. The board eventually unaniraously approved the five-year capital-improvement plan. The topic of ordering a feasibility report for the whole valley will undoubtedly be discussed in more detail at future meetings. The district's next board meetin is set for Dec. flat 9 a.m. FOR RENT GOLD MOUNTAIN HOME 4 Bedrooms,4 Baths Fully Furnished Available Nov 1st to May 31 Sierra Mountain Hideaway 181 E. Sierra Street Portola, Ca 96122 530-249-9844 sierramtnhideaway@yahoo.com OMG/ The Holidays are Here/l/ Not ready, feeling uninspired? Let us Help You with our !) /'HOLIDAYMEALS TO G0"7 '%fl  Starting at Only $25 per person Thanksgiving Orders Nov. 23  by Sunday,  for pick up Wed. Nov. 26 a Christmas Orders by Sunday Dec. 14 h for pick up Mo, Dec. 22  (Delivery Available for extra charge) 530-836-1619 Thanksgiving Meal Includes: Choice of Turkey Breast or Whole Turkey(4 or more) Stuffing, Gravy, Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans Almndine, Sweet Potato & Kale Casserole, Cranberry/Orange Sauce, Rolls or Cornbread* Desserts Extra: Apple, Pumpkin, or Pecan Pie (Special orders available upon request) *Turkey Pot Pies, Soups, Salads and many other items also available Cafg Hours Begin Thursday, Dec.  Winter Thursday-Saturday: Lunch l lam- 2pm and Dinner 4- Saturday and Sunday Brunch 8am- 2pro  We also offer Private Events and Cateruj i/ bonta]ut gardens ca] ? "loca fresh and delicious" /  190 Bonta St. - Blawsden, CA 96103  / www.bontafu@ardenscafe.com - bontafulgardeuscafe@gmaiZco/ Members of the community go on an educational hike around private forest areas organized by the Natural Resource Conservation Service. Several examples of how landowners reduced fuel and worked toward forest restoration were shown during the outing. Photo by James Wilso Welcome Back! Janet Thompson, NP Janet Thompson has returned to the rural health clinic at Plumas District Hospital. Janet specializes in women's health and sees patients on Wednesdays in the North Fork Family Medicine Building. Call for your appointment - 283-5640. DISTRICT HOSPffAL Thank You! This "Christmas at Crescent Country" was by far the best in Five Years! It was a pleasure to see so many shoppers out and in such good moods. We hope all the stores enjoyed an increase in business. In our way of thanking our long time and much appreciated customers... , We re Having a Drawing Every Week. ~ From now until Christmas ~ Win a $50 Gift Certificate! Congratulations to the lucky winners of our "Three Day Holiday Open House" $50 Drawing! Judy Earl, LakealmanoroMiaVanFleet, IndianValley Tatum Stockard (visiting parents in Indian Valley) Without Lisa's Helpers - for many years, Nothing Would Be Possible! i Cheryl S., Cookie J., Camille, Alicia D. Jennifer G, Lisa S., and Kristy B. BLESS YOU ALL! Open Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat: 11 - 5 Sun: 11 - 4 Hwy 89, Crescent Mills 530-284-6016 , Feather River Bulletin Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 9A Landowners, conservation service partner to strengthen forest health P James Wilson Staff Writer jw Ison@p umasnews.com i: ': The residents of Butterfly :: Valley can sleep a little easier ; at night, without as much ' worry of their property catching fire. Many landowners in the valley i] partnered with the Natural ' Resource Conservation Service to reduce the threat of wildfire and restore the health of the forest on their property. NRCS' Dan Martynn, along with forest-restoration advocate William Jacks, led a group around Butterfly Valley on Nov. 7, highlighting the fuel reduction work that has been done to the area. In addition to highlighting area work that has been done on private land, Plumas National Forest Mt. Hough District Ranger Mike Donald and fire ecologist David Kinateder presented information on the planned Butterfly Valley-Twain Project to reduce fuels around the residential area. NRCS helped several residents reduce the risk of fire by providing technical and financial assistance. Landowners signed up for the Environmental Quality "Our overall goal is to build resilient forests." David Kinateder Fire Ecologist Plumas National Forest Incentives Program through NRCS. NRCS and the landowners developed plans for their areas, the landowners got to work on cleaning up the forest on their property, and NRCS reimbursed the landowners for their work. The partnership resulted in lower forest -- and thus fuel -- density. Martynn and Jacks led the walk, showing examples of what private forest lands in Plumas County can look like when cleared. Theysaid fire danger had been reduced dramatically. In addition to showing cleared lands, the two led the group on Plumas National Forest land that borders the private property to show what an overgrown forest looks like. Dead trees and crowded saplings frilled the forest. In their presentation on the proposed Butterfly Valley-Twain project, Donald and Kinateder addressed the overgrowth in Plumas National Forest. "I know this is an area that needs treatment," said Donald. "Together we can be consistent and make it a fire-safe area." Kinateder spoke of the Forest Service's past focus on suppression rather than prevention. With the aid of a graph, he demonstrated a trend of fires in the area. Since the Forest Service began in 1905, forest fires have remained at a minimum. In the last decade, however, the forests have seen more high-impact fires than ever before. If that trend continues, the next decade will be even worse. Kinateder stressed the importance of prevention. "We need to adapt. Our overall goal is to build resilient forests." The proposed project will cover around 4,000 acres. The Mt. Hough Ranger District plans to hold a public meeting on the project sometime in early December. The location and date was undecided at the time of writing. Private landowners who are interested in applying for the Environmental Quality Incentives Program can contact Martynn at 283-7511. Five-year plan raises questions about services district's future James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Quincy Community Services District general manager Larry Sullivan presented a five-year caPtalLrnprovment plan at the district's regular meeting Nov. 13. The plan spurred a heavy discussion about the future of the district before the board approved the plan. "I'm just a little frustrated with where the district is going," said board member Richard Castaldini. "I don't have a good picture of what we need to run this plant." Two major issues Castaldini had with the plan both dealt with cost-heavy projects. Tentatively scheduled for the 2015-16 fiscal year is a berm project with an estimated cost of $700,000. The other cost-heavy project, scheduled on the plan for the 2018-19 year, is a $4 million filtration and UV disinfection project. The berm project needs to be completed for the district's wastewater treatment plant to comply with a state order. The filtration and UV disinfection project would upgrade the plant so chemicals and bleach would no longer be used to treat wastewater. Castaldini's main concern was whether or not the projects are the best fit for the district. Board member Denny Churchill reminded the board that approval of the plan wouldn't mean the projects would be etched in stone. A five-year plan approved from the board was necessary, however, to qualify for certain grants. "A feasibility study could answer 97 percent of our questions," Churchill went on. "We need a defmitive study of what is best for this valley." The district has tossed about the idea of ordering a feasibility study for years. Prior disagreement with the other district in the valley, the East Quincy Services District, was one of the main holdups that prevented QCSD from forging ahead with the study. The climate surrounding the disagreement has cooled recently, however, as members from both districts have been working together in a wastewater treatment rate committee. "I think both districts are fmally starting to realize that we're all in this same leaky little boat together," said Churchill. The board eventually unaniraously approved the five-year capital-improvement plan. The topic of ordering a feasibility report for the whole valley will undoubtedly be discussed in more detail at future meetings. The district's next board meetin is set for Dec. flat 9 a.m. FOR RENT GOLD MOUNTAIN HOME 4 Bedrooms,4 Baths Fully Furnished Available Nov 1st to May 31 Sierra Mountain Hideaway 181 E. Sierra Street Portola, Ca 96122 530-249-9844 sierramtnhideaway@yahoo.com OMG/ The Holidays are Here/l/ Not ready, feeling uninspired? Let us Help You with our !) /'HOLIDAYMEALS TO G0"7 '%fl  Starting at Only $25 per person Thanksgiving Orders Nov. 23  by Sunday,  for pick up Wed. Nov. 26 a Christmas Orders by Sunday Dec. 14 h for pick up Mo, Dec. 22  (Delivery Available for extra charge) 530-836-1619 Thanksgiving Meal Includes: Choice of Turkey Breast or Whole Turkey(4 or more) Stuffing, Gravy, Garlic Mashed Potatoes, Green Beans Almndine, Sweet Potato & Kale Casserole, Cranberry/Orange Sauce, Rolls or Cornbread* Desserts Extra: Apple, Pumpkin, or Pecan Pie (Special orders available upon request) *Turkey Pot Pies, Soups, Salads and many other items also available Cafg Hours Begin Thursday, Dec.  Winter Thursday-Saturday: Lunch l lam- 2pm and Dinner 4- Saturday and Sunday Brunch 8am- 2pro  We also offer Private Events and Cateruj i/ bonta]ut gardens ca] ? "loca fresh and delicious" /  190 Bonta St. - Blawsden, CA 96103  / www.bontafu@ardenscafe.com - bontafulgardeuscafe@gmaiZco/ Members of the community go on an educational hike around private forest areas organized by the Natural Resource Conservation Service. Several examples of how landowners reduced fuel and worked toward forest restoration were shown during the outing. Photo by James Wilso Welcome Back! Janet Thompson, NP Janet Thompson has returned to the rural health clinic at Plumas District Hospital. Janet specializes in women's health and sees patients on Wednesdays in the North Fork Family Medicine Building. Call for your appointment - 283-5640. DISTRICT HOSPffAL Thank You! This "Christmas at Crescent Country" was by far the best in Five Years! It was a pleasure to see so many shoppers out and in such good moods. We hope all the stores enjoyed an increase in business. In our way of thanking our long time and much appreciated customers... , We re Having a Drawing Every Week. ~ From now until Christmas ~ Win a $50 Gift Certificate! Congratulations to the lucky winners of our "Three Day Holiday Open House" $50 Drawing! Judy Earl, LakealmanoroMiaVanFleet, IndianValley Tatum Stockard (visiting parents in Indian Valley) Without Lisa's Helpers - for many years, Nothing Would Be Possible! i Cheryl S., Cookie J., Camille, Alicia D. Jennifer G, Lisa S., and Kristy B. BLESS YOU ALL! Open Mon, Thurs, Fri, Sat: 11 - 5 Sun: 11 - 4 Hwy 89, Crescent Mills 530-284-6016