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Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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1Ok Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Feather River Bulletin COMMUNIT'00' CORNER WEEKLY GATHERINGS, MEETINGS AND CLUBS Thursday, Nov. 20 AA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Quincy Cribbage Group. Every Thurs., 12:30 sharp. Come early and have lunch. Round Table Pizza. No dues or fees. Women's Support Group, Every Thurs., 1-2 p.m., Plumas Crisis Center, 591 Main St., Quincy. Call 283- 5515. M-Anon, 5:30 p.m., United Methodist Church, upstairs in back. For families & friends of alcoholics. Boy Scouts Troop 130, 6:30 p.m., LDS Church, 55 Bel- lamy Ln. Call Dale Stokes, 283-3661. Blue Star Moms, 7 p.m., Masonic Lodge, Harbison Street, Quincy. Lions Club, 1st & 3rd Thursdays, noon, Moon's Restaurant, Quincy, Call 283- 0495. Second Horizon Club, Vet- eran's Hall, 1 p.m. 1st & 3rd Thurs. Juvenile Justice Commis- sion, noon, every 3rd Thurs., 1446 E. Main, Quincy, Open to public. Vikki Tuck, 283-1136, for more info. VFW - Kenneth M. Hayes Post 3825, Veterans Hall, Lawrence St., Quincy 5:30 pm, 3rd Thursdays. Post Commander Alan C. DeWolf, 283-3638. People 1st, serf-advocacy for people with developmental disabilities. Round Table Pizza, Quincy Social time: 4- 5:30 p.m.; meeting, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost for pizza. 3rd Thurs. Quincy Crazy Quilters, 3rd Thurs., 6 p.m., Plumas Bank credit admin building, 32 Central Ave., Quincy Busi- ness meeting, quilting demo or activity, show & tell, re- freshments. Call 283-2875. Plumas County Search & Rescue, 7 p.m., Mineral Building, Plumas County Fairgrounds. 3rd Thurs. Friday, Nov. 21 AA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. NA, 6:00 p.m., 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy, Free Perishable Commodi- ties. Distributed 3rd Fri- days of the month. CAN building, behind St. John's Catholic Church, Lawrence St., Quincy, NOON. Call 283- 5628 for more information. Saturday, Nov. 22 NA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy. AA, 6 p.m. 260 County Hos- pital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Dukes of Plumas Crib- bage Gang. Meet 10:30 a.m., start play 11 a.m., every Sat- urday at Mt. Tomba, Cromberg. Waffle Breakfast. Feather River Grange Hall, Quincy. 8 a.m.-10 a.m. For more info, call John, 927-8879. Sunday, Nov. 23 NA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy NA, 5 p.m., women only, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House. Quincy Trap Shoot, sponsored by Quincy Sport Shooting Assoc., Gopher Hill site. Weather permitting. Every other Sunday, Adults 10 am, Juniors 11 am. 283-1145. quincyshooting.com. Monday, Nov. 24 Soroptimist International of Quincy, noon to I p.m. Moon's restaurant. NA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy Rotary Club, Mineral Building, fairgrounds, noon. Call 283-2127. Boy Scout Troop 151, Mon., 6 p.m. Scoutmaster Jan Jensen, 283-2209 for loca- tion. Duplicate Bridge. Every Monday, 6:30 p.m., Resource Center, Blairsden, corner of hwys 70 and 89. Call Ruth Bright, 836-1454 or Jackie Lucky, 836-2232. AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Tuesday, Nov. 25 Knitting and Crochet group, 12 p.m.-l:30 p.m., Quincy library meeting room. All skill levels wel- come. For more info, Lynn Sheehy, 283-6310. AA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Bingo, every Tuesday, for residents of Country Villa Healthcare Center, Quincy 2:30 p.m. Sponsored by Coun- try Villa Pink Ladies. New volunteers needed. Call Betty Hoskins, 283-1616. Overeaters Anonymous meeting, 5 p.m., 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House, Quincy NA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy. Bible Study. (King James version) 7-8 p.m., Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 55 Bellamy Lane, Quincy Open to all. Bibles available. Call 530-953-7790 for more info. Leagtle of Women Voters, fourth Tues., 6 p.m. Quincy library meeting room. Sept. thru June. Call 283-0485 for more info. Wednesday, Nov. 26 Baby Bounce Story Time. Infants 0 to 24 months, Wednesdays 10 a.m., Plumas County Library Quincy branch. 445 Jackson St. Preschool Storytime. Sto- ries, gongs, crafts and games. 10:30 a.m., Commu- nity Meeting Room, Quincy Library, 445 Jackson St. For inforznation, call the library, 283-6310. American Valley Toast- masters. Every Wed., 12-1 p.m., Plumas Bank Credit Administration building, 32 Central Ave., Quincy, (Be- hind 8afeway.) For more info, contact Kathy, 283-7618. Open to all interested in de- veloping their speaking and leadership skills. AA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy, 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Senior lunch, Blairsden, noon Mohawk Community Resource Center. Call 836- 0446 ibr reservations. Grief Group, Community United Methodist Church. Join Pastor Donna at noon to begin or continue the process of healing. Open to everyone. Call the church of- rice, 283-1740, for more info. Quincy Community Sup- per, 6 p.m. every Wed, Unit(d Methodist Church. Free. AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy, 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Elks meeting, Elks Lodge, Hwy 70, E. Quincy, social 5:30 p.m.; dinner 6:30 p.m.; meeting 7:30 p.m.; 2nd & 4th Wed. I. You'll Save Gas 3. You'll Save Money 2, You'll Save Time 4. You'll Help Our Local Economy LAST WEEK'S TEMPERATURES Date High Low Precip Snow Nov. 10 63 28 .... Nov. 11 61 29 .... Nov. 12 56 29 .... Nov. 13 58 38 .24 -- Nov. 14 57 42 .01 -- Nov. 15 56 36 -- -- Nov. 16 48 22 .... Total precipitation, July 1,2014, to date: 5,13" precip; snow 0" This date 2013: 2.63" precip, 0" snow. 2013-14 totals: 21.91" total precip, 7" snow. 2012-13: 37.93" total precip; 23.75" snow. (Weather year is July 1 to June 30) Compiled by Run Trumbo LAKE LEVELS Lake A!manor *Elevation 1Current 4,476.41 1 Year Ago 4,480.52 Lake Almanor **Capacity 1Current ,704,457 1 Year Ago 799,654 Bucks Lake *Elevation 1"Current 5,131.88 1 Year Ago 5,127.82 Bucks Lake **Capacity 1"Current 62,892 1 Year Ago 56,716 *Elevation above sea level in ft. **Storage in acre ft. 1"Nov. 16, 2014 Nov. 17,2013 Weather Forecast for Quincy Wednesday, Nov. 19 Sunrise 6:56-Sunset 4:48 d dd 30% chance of showers, = mainly after 10am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 49. Wednesday Night: A 40% chance of showers, mainly after 4am. Mostly cloudy, low around 30. Saturday, Nov. 22 Sunrise 6:59--Sunset 4:46 * i i L i i i i i i i ,i I i i i i i Showers likely. Mostly Thursday, Nov. 20 Sunrise 6:57--Sunset 4:47 70% chance i;ain, mainly between 10am- 4pro. Cloudy, high near 45. c2Z Thursday Night: A chance of rain before lOpm, then slight chance rain/snow showers, Mostly cloudy, low around 30. Sunday, Nov. 23 Sunrise 7:00--Sunset 4:45 4) Mostly sunny, high near Friday, Nov. 21 Sunrise 6:58--Sunset 4:47 A 20% chance of rain: Mostly cloudy, high near 47. 005(50 Friday Night: Rain likely. Mostly cloudy, low around 34. Monday, Nov. 24 Sunrise 7:01 --Sunset 4:45 4) Mostly sunny, high near cloudy, high near 46. Saturday Night: A chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, low around 32. 43. i,,aV' Advanced Geologic Exploration, Inc. C Scientists of the EOrth T', 180 Main St. P.O. Box 1956 Chester CA 96020 (530) 258-4228 m Professionals providing better science, better service, better results! m Sunday Night: Mostly clear, low around 28. 46. Tuesday, Nov. 25 Sunrise 7:02-Sunset 4:44 CHURCHES Calvary Chapel Quincy 283-4463. 1953 E. Main, Mill Creek Shopping Center, E. Quincy. Christian Life Fellowship 283-0345, 317 First St., E. Quincy. Christ the King Episcopal 283-0254, 545 Lawrence St., Quincy. christthekingquincy.org Church of Christ 283-1191, 152 E. Jackson St., Quincy. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 283-2170, 55 Bellamy In., Quincy. Community United Methodist 283-1740, 282 Jackson St., Quincy, quincymethodist.org First Baptist. 283-1160, 74 Reese St., Quincy. flocquincy.org. facebook.com/firstbaptistquincy Meadow Valley Community 283-459, 48 Cemetery Rd, Meadow Valley, office: 353 Jackson St, #100, Quincy Our Savior Lutheran 283-2546. Church & High Sts., Quincy. Seventh.Day Adventist 310-2042 or 283-3092, 2333 Pine St., Quincy. Springs of Hope Christian Fellowship Pete, 283-1613, or John, 927-7626, 59 Bell Ln., Quincy. St. John's Catholic Church 283-0890, 176 Lawrence St., Quincy. Starlight Missionary Baptist 283-1505, 171 Redburg Ave., Quincy. Truth Tabernacle of Quincy, 260-8006, 2205 East Main St., Quincy. ,.! 1.9 51 1:45. . --I-- "fo/30 - - - - -- 12 ---- 7'29"am -- /  5.016"a2.m ! 10/;  B,y I |l / V1o/2: : / - Reddi  /" " ter " %, i  10/28 -" "/  %, ,."em,. 2 5 / " ,., L 00o:o,o 1o12, 7:36 p.m. | /". ,i   / ,, ; PJ 1 1o1200 x" \\; ; I" 1.9 % .... ;'  "-  \\;,If ,  ,I., l:0p.m. " .- ",=  ,'J/ e"ttV 1.O 10124 ,Orovile ,"-- ...,"'__ f_ ,}' 11:27 pm. " :  o12 IsPtNYGld00rl):$1071'zH------- "'j J'/7 C3_ e;_"" '. Magnitude I 1.7 1.0 . 1.0 4:54 a.m. ,2:10 p.m. 11:19 a.m. - O, I lO12, 0t 2 3 4+ 10/27 10/25 Earthquake activity increased slightly from the previous week, rising by three and back into the teens. The intensity of seismicity remained relaxed, as only one quake registered in the M Z range. The robust earthquake swarm resumed in northern Washoe County, Nevada near Calcutta (Dry) Lake. It occurred about five miles south of the Idaho border and 15 miles east of the California border in Long Valley. It began in mid July and has pumped out hundreds of earthquake, in- cludinj a couple dozen in the M 3 range. This is a remote area and it is unlikely any of the activity has been felt. The activity is happening on the northern Long Valley fault zone, a series of west-facing normal faults that creates a series of linear dry lake bds on the down-dropped side. The frequency and duration of the activity suggests it is related to hydrothermal processes, but because it is happening on a active fault zone, it could have tectornic ramifications. This fault zone is capable of quakes in the low M 7s. School district board holds off hiring lobbyists James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Whether or not to hire Capitol Advisors Group LLC, a lobbying fLrm out of Sacramento, was a hot topic at the Plumas Unified School District regular board meeting Nov. 13 at Greenville High School. After much discussion, the board decided to wait on its decision until more information was provided. Members of Capitol Advisors Group initially gave a presentation to the board during the October meeting in Portola. The group highlighted the different services it would offer the school district. Last Thursday, the board discussed a formal proposal Capitol Advisors Group laid out for its services. The proposal was in the board packet and open for public view before the meeting. In its proposal for facilities and education management services, the group mentioned collaboration with Eastshore Consulting LLC. The two firms proposed to consult for the district in its future bond, facilities and financial efforts. The proposal split its services into three categories -- integrated planning, program implementation and legislative advocacy. Highlights on how the firms plan to implement these services were provided. The ultimate goal would be to acquire funds for the district's facilities. The proposal called for a retainer of $3,000 per month with the additional cost of $500 per day for expenses to cover travel for onsite services. During the October meeting, Capitol Advisors Group's Richard G0nzalez "'- estimated it would take 30 - 60 days to complete the first phase, with two days of onsite evaluation. The proposed contract would be subject to termination at any time. During the public comment portion of the Nov. 13 meeting, two community members addressed the board in regard to the proposal. John Oravetz and Traci Holt both asked the board to table its decision until a future meeting after new members were sworn in onto the board. Holt, who is the newly elected representative of District 5, will replace presiding board member Sonja Anderson at next month's meeting. "This proposal should be up to the decision of the new board," said Holt. "Has the proposal been truly reviewed? If it hasn't been thoroughly examined it should be tabled for next month." Holt continued, calling the proposal vague in terms of a timeline and services provided. Holt said she didn't view the agenda item as urgent. Oravetz, who spoke to the board before Holt, shared similar sentiments. "I think it's too early to vote on this. Are you certain without reasonable doubt that this is something you want to set forth for the future board?" Other problems Oravetz had with the proposal were a lack of detail in its description of services to be rendered and the absence of a timeline indicating a completion date. "I think it's critically important the district knows what it wants," said Oravetz. "If you do have any uncertainties, then I request that the (agenda item) gets tabled until February or March." Once the agenda item came up, board member Bret Cook was the first to speak up. Cook started by recognizing the validity of the points brought up in public comment. "I thought I would see something different," Cook said of the proposal. "I would like to see something more specific. I would like to get a written commitment of what we would get." Cook then highlighted some favorable aspects of the proposal. Because no extended contract is involved, the financial risk is minimal. If the district board doesn't feel Capitol Advisors Group's work measures up to its expectations, it can terminate the partnership at any time. Cook also stated that Capitol Advisors Group has a particular set of skills that is currently absent in the district -- namely, lobbying skills. "I think we do have a clear idea as a board as to what we need to do," Cook said, ' addressing Oravetz's public comment. "We want to take this district into the next century. We owe it to the staff and students to take a look at our facilities and see how we can improve them." Board president Chris Russell agreed with Cook that more specifics were needed. Board member Leslie Edlund said the proposal would have to mesh with the District Advisory Committee's goals. "We've approved a lot of big capital expenditures in the last year, maintaining our buildings," Edlund added. "If there's a way to do that that is less expensive, then I'm all in." The board instructed Superintendent Micheline Miglis to ask Capitol Advisors Group for a more detailed cost analysis and references to call, and to present the revised proposal during the Dec. 11 meeting. State announces new science standard guidelines State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson said the state is one step closer to implementing the California Next Generation Science Standards as the state Board of Education recently adopted a new plan. "This plan lays out what the state, districts and the community can do to ensure that the exciting new science standards are implemented smoothly," said Torlakson. "These standards will provide all students with a deeper understanding of science so they are better prepared for college and careers, including jobs in the high-technology fields." The NGSS Systems Implementation Plan for California offers school districts and the community strategies on how to provide educators training and resources to teach the new standards. The plan helps districts align local testing to improve teaching and learning. There are also tips on improving communication; how to get everyone to work together; and using the new standards in before- and after-school programs. The state NGSS moves away from teaching science by rote memorization in a single subject matter, and now teaches students how to use analytical skills learned in several subject matters to understand the world around them. For example, NGSS integrates engineering and technology practices to help students understand science and the natural world. NGSS also connects students with the Common Core state standards, which officials say teach them 21st-century skills needed for college and careers. Industries relying on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects are major drivers of California's economy. A 2011 U.S. Department of Commerce study found that over the last decade, the number of STEM jobs grew three times faster than that of jobs in other occupations, and they will continue to outpace non-STEM jobs in the next decade. 1Ok Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Feather River Bulletin COMMUNIT'00' CORNER WEEKLY GATHERINGS, MEETINGS AND CLUBS Thursday, Nov. 20 AA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Quincy Cribbage Group. Every Thurs., 12:30 sharp. Come early and have lunch. Round Table Pizza. No dues or fees. Women's Support Group, Every Thurs., 1-2 p.m., Plumas Crisis Center, 591 Main St., Quincy. Call 283- 5515. M-Anon, 5:30 p.m., United Methodist Church, upstairs in back. For families & friends of alcoholics. Boy Scouts Troop 130, 6:30 p.m., LDS Church, 55 Bel- lamy Ln. Call Dale Stokes, 283-3661. Blue Star Moms, 7 p.m., Masonic Lodge, Harbison Street, Quincy. Lions Club, 1st & 3rd Thursdays, noon, Moon's Restaurant, Quincy, Call 283- 0495. Second Horizon Club, Vet- eran's Hall, 1 p.m. 1st & 3rd Thurs. Juvenile Justice Commis- sion, noon, every 3rd Thurs., 1446 E. Main, Quincy, Open to public. Vikki Tuck, 283-1136, for more info. VFW - Kenneth M. Hayes Post 3825, Veterans Hall, Lawrence St., Quincy 5:30 pm, 3rd Thursdays. Post Commander Alan C. DeWolf, 283-3638. People 1st, serf-advocacy for people with developmental disabilities. Round Table Pizza, Quincy Social time: 4- 5:30 p.m.; meeting, 5:30-7 p.m. Cost for pizza. 3rd Thurs. Quincy Crazy Quilters, 3rd Thurs., 6 p.m., Plumas Bank credit admin building, 32 Central Ave., Quincy Busi- ness meeting, quilting demo or activity, show & tell, re- freshments. Call 283-2875. Plumas County Search & Rescue, 7 p.m., Mineral Building, Plumas County Fairgrounds. 3rd Thurs. Friday, Nov. 21 AA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. NA, 6:00 p.m., 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy, Free Perishable Commodi- ties. Distributed 3rd Fri- days of the month. CAN building, behind St. John's Catholic Church, Lawrence St., Quincy, NOON. Call 283- 5628 for more information. Saturday, Nov. 22 NA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy. AA, 6 p.m. 260 County Hos- pital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Dukes of Plumas Crib- bage Gang. Meet 10:30 a.m., start play 11 a.m., every Sat- urday at Mt. Tomba, Cromberg. Waffle Breakfast. Feather River Grange Hall, Quincy. 8 a.m.-10 a.m. For more info, call John, 927-8879. Sunday, Nov. 23 NA, noon, 260 County Hospi- tal Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House. Quincy NA, 5 p.m., women only, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House. Quincy Trap Shoot, sponsored by Quincy Sport Shooting Assoc., Gopher Hill site. Weather permitting. Every other Sunday, Adults 10 am, Juniors 11 am. 283-1145. quincyshooting.com. Monday, Nov. 24 Soroptimist International of Quincy, noon to I p.m. Moon's restaurant. NA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy Rotary Club, Mineral Building, fairgrounds, noon. Call 283-2127. Boy Scout Troop 151, Mon., 6 p.m. Scoutmaster Jan Jensen, 283-2209 for loca- tion. Duplicate Bridge. Every Monday, 6:30 p.m., Resource Center, Blairsden, corner of hwys 70 and 89. Call Ruth Bright, 836-1454 or Jackie Lucky, 836-2232. AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy. 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Tuesday, Nov. 25 Knitting and Crochet group, 12 p.m.-l:30 p.m., Quincy library meeting room. All skill levels wel- come. For more info, Lynn Sheehy, 283-6310. AA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Bingo, every Tuesday, for residents of Country Villa Healthcare Center, Quincy 2:30 p.m. Sponsored by Coun- try Villa Pink Ladies. New volunteers needed. Call Betty Hoskins, 283-1616. Overeaters Anonymous meeting, 5 p.m., 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Orchard House, Quincy NA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy. Bible Study. (King James version) 7-8 p.m., Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, 55 Bellamy Lane, Quincy Open to all. Bibles available. Call 530-953-7790 for more info. Leagtle of Women Voters, fourth Tues., 6 p.m. Quincy library meeting room. Sept. thru June. Call 283-0485 for more info. Wednesday, Nov. 26 Baby Bounce Story Time. Infants 0 to 24 months, Wednesdays 10 a.m., Plumas County Library Quincy branch. 445 Jackson St. Preschool Storytime. Sto- ries, gongs, crafts and games. 10:30 a.m., Commu- nity Meeting Room, Quincy Library, 445 Jackson St. For inforznation, call the library, 283-6310. American Valley Toast- masters. Every Wed., 12-1 p.m., Plumas Bank Credit Administration building, 32 Central Ave., Quincy, (Be- hind 8afeway.) For more info, contact Kathy, 283-7618. Open to all interested in de- veloping their speaking and leadership skills. AA meeting, noon, 260 County Hospital Road, Courthouse Annex - Or- chard House, Quincy, 24- hour info: (877) 880-3880. Senior lunch, Blairsden, noon Mohawk Community Resource Center. Call 836- 0446 ibr reservations. Grief Group, Community United Methodist Church. Join Pastor Donna at noon to begin or continue the process of healing. Open to everyone. Call the church of- rice, 283-1740, for more info. Quincy Community Sup- per, 6 p.m. every Wed, Unit(d Methodist Church. Free. AA, 7 p.m., Methodist Church, 282 Jackson St., Quincy, 24-hour info: (877) 880-3880. Elks meeting, Elks Lodge, Hwy 70, E. Quincy, social 5:30 p.m.; dinner 6:30 p.m.; meeting 7:30 p.m.; 2nd & 4th Wed. I. You'll Save Gas 3. You'll Save Money 2, You'll Save Time 4. You'll Help Our Local Economy LAST WEEK'S TEMPERATURES Date High Low Precip Snow Nov. 10 63 28 .... Nov. 11 61 29 .... Nov. 12 56 29 .... Nov. 13 58 38 .24 -- Nov. 14 57 42 .01 -- Nov. 15 56 36 -- -- Nov. 16 48 22 .... Total precipitation, July 1,2014, to date: 5,13" precip; snow 0" This date 2013: 2.63" precip, 0" snow. 2013-14 totals: 21.91" total precip, 7" snow. 2012-13: 37.93" total precip; 23.75" snow. (Weather year is July 1 to June 30) Compiled by Run Trumbo LAKE LEVELS Lake A!manor *Elevation 1Current 4,476.41 1 Year Ago 4,480.52 Lake Almanor **Capacity 1Current ,704,457 1 Year Ago 799,654 Bucks Lake *Elevation 1"Current 5,131.88 1 Year Ago 5,127.82 Bucks Lake **Capacity 1"Current 62,892 1 Year Ago 56,716 *Elevation above sea level in ft. **Storage in acre ft. 1"Nov. 16, 2014 Nov. 17,2013 Weather Forecast for Quincy Wednesday, Nov. 19 Sunrise 6:56-Sunset 4:48 d dd 30% chance of showers, = mainly after 10am. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 49. Wednesday Night: A 40% chance of showers, mainly after 4am. Mostly cloudy, low around 30. Saturday, Nov. 22 Sunrise 6:59--Sunset 4:46 * i i L i i i i i i i ,i I i i i i i Showers likely. Mostly Thursday, Nov. 20 Sunrise 6:57--Sunset 4:47 70% chance i;ain, mainly between 10am- 4pro. Cloudy, high near 45. c2Z Thursday Night: A chance of rain before lOpm, then slight chance rain/snow showers, Mostly cloudy, low around 30. Sunday, Nov. 23 Sunrise 7:00--Sunset 4:45 4) Mostly sunny, high near Friday, Nov. 21 Sunrise 6:58--Sunset 4:47 A 20% chance of rain: Mostly cloudy, high near 47. 005(50 Friday Night: Rain likely. Mostly cloudy, low around 34. Monday, Nov. 24 Sunrise 7:01 --Sunset 4:45 4) Mostly sunny, high near cloudy, high near 46. Saturday Night: A chance of showers. Mostly cloudy, low around 32. 43. i,,aV' Advanced Geologic Exploration, Inc. C Scientists of the EOrth T', 180 Main St. P.O. Box 1956 Chester CA 96020 (530) 258-4228 m Professionals providing better science, better service, better results! m Sunday Night: Mostly clear, low around 28. 46. Tuesday, Nov. 25 Sunrise 7:02-Sunset 4:44 CHURCHES Calvary Chapel Quincy 283-4463. 1953 E. Main, Mill Creek Shopping Center, E. Quincy. Christian Life Fellowship 283-0345, 317 First St., E. Quincy. Christ the King Episcopal 283-0254, 545 Lawrence St., Quincy. christthekingquincy.org Church of Christ 283-1191, 152 E. Jackson St., Quincy. Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints 283-2170, 55 Bellamy In., Quincy. Community United Methodist 283-1740, 282 Jackson St., Quincy, quincymethodist.org First Baptist. 283-1160, 74 Reese St., Quincy. flocquincy.org. facebook.com/firstbaptistquincy Meadow Valley Community 283-459, 48 Cemetery Rd, Meadow Valley, office: 353 Jackson St, #100, Quincy Our Savior Lutheran 283-2546. Church & High Sts., Quincy. Seventh.Day Adventist 310-2042 or 283-3092, 2333 Pine St., Quincy. Springs of Hope Christian Fellowship Pete, 283-1613, or John, 927-7626, 59 Bell Ln., Quincy. St. John's Catholic Church 283-0890, 176 Lawrence St., Quincy. Starlight Missionary Baptist 283-1505, 171 Redburg Ave., Quincy. Truth Tabernacle of Quincy, 260-8006, 2205 East Main St., Quincy. ,.! 1.9 51 1:45. . --I-- "fo/30 - - - - -- 12 ---- 7'29"am -- /  5.016"a2.m ! 10/;  B,y I |l / V1o/2: : / - Reddi  /" " ter " %, i  10/28 -" "/  %, ,."em,. 2 5 / " ,., L 00o:o,o 1o12, 7:36 p.m. | /". ,i   / ,, ; PJ 1 1o1200 x" \\; ; I" 1.9 % .... ;'  "-  \\;,If ,  ,I., l:0p.m. " .- ",=  ,'J/ e"ttV 1.O 10124 ,Orovile ,"-- ...,"'__ f_ ,}' 11:27 pm. " :  o12 IsPtNYGld00rl):$1071'zH------- "'j J'/7 C3_ e;_"" '. Magnitude I 1.7 1.0 . 1.0 4:54 a.m. ,2:10 p.m. 11:19 a.m. - O, I lO12, 0t 2 3 4+ 10/27 10/25 Earthquake activity increased slightly from the previous week, rising by three and back into the teens. The intensity of seismicity remained relaxed, as only one quake registered in the M Z range. The robust earthquake swarm resumed in northern Washoe County, Nevada near Calcutta (Dry) Lake. It occurred about five miles south of the Idaho border and 15 miles east of the California border in Long Valley. It began in mid July and has pumped out hundreds of earthquake, in- cludinj a couple dozen in the M 3 range. This is a remote area and it is unlikely any of the activity has been felt. The activity is happening on the northern Long Valley fault zone, a series of west-facing normal faults that creates a series of linear dry lake bds on the down-dropped side. The frequency and duration of the activity suggests it is related to hydrothermal processes, but because it is happening on a active fault zone, it could have tectornic ramifications. This fault zone is capable of quakes in the low M 7s. School district board holds off hiring lobbyists James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Whether or not to hire Capitol Advisors Group LLC, a lobbying fLrm out of Sacramento, was a hot topic at the Plumas Unified School District regular board meeting Nov. 13 at Greenville High School. After much discussion, the board decided to wait on its decision until more information was provided. Members of Capitol Advisors Group initially gave a presentation to the board during the October meeting in Portola. The group highlighted the different services it would offer the school district. Last Thursday, the board discussed a formal proposal Capitol Advisors Group laid out for its services. The proposal was in the board packet and open for public view before the meeting. In its proposal for facilities and education management services, the group mentioned collaboration with Eastshore Consulting LLC. The two firms proposed to consult for the district in its future bond, facilities and financial efforts. The proposal split its services into three categories -- integrated planning, program implementation and legislative advocacy. Highlights on how the firms plan to implement these services were provided. The ultimate goal would be to acquire funds for the district's facilities. The proposal called for a retainer of $3,000 per month with the additional cost of $500 per day for expenses to cover travel for onsite services. During the October meeting, Capitol Advisors Group's Richard G0nzalez "'- estimated it would take 30 - 60 days to complete the first phase, with two days of onsite evaluation. The proposed contract would be subject to termination at any time. During the public comment portion of the Nov. 13 meeting, two community members addressed the board in regard to the proposal. John Oravetz and Traci Holt both asked the board to table its decision until a future meeting after new members were sworn in onto the board. Holt, who is the newly elected representative of District 5, will replace presiding board member Sonja Anderson at next month's meeting. "This proposal should be up to the decision of the new board," said Holt. "Has the proposal been truly reviewed? If it hasn't been thoroughly examined it should be tabled for next month." Holt continued, calling the proposal vague in terms of a timeline and services provided. Holt said she didn't view the agenda item as urgent. Oravetz, who spoke to the board before Holt, shared similar sentiments. "I think it's too early to vote on this. Are you certain without reasonable doubt that this is something you want to set forth for the future board?" Other problems Oravetz had with the proposal were a lack of detail in its description of services to be rendered and the absence of a timeline indicating a completion date. "I think it's critically important the district knows what it wants," said Oravetz. "If you do have any uncertainties, then I request that the (agenda item) gets tabled until February or March." Once the agenda item came up, board member Bret Cook was the first to speak up. Cook started by recognizing the validity of the points brought up in public comment. "I thought I would see something different," Cook said of the proposal. "I would like to see something more specific. I would like to get a written commitment of what we would get." Cook then highlighted some favorable aspects of the proposal. Because no extended contract is involved, the financial risk is minimal. If the district board doesn't feel Capitol Advisors Group's work measures up to its expectations, it can terminate the partnership at any time. Cook also stated that Capitol Advisors Group has a particular set of skills that is currently absent in the district -- namely, lobbying skills. "I think we do have a clear idea as a board as to what we need to do," Cook said, ' addressing Oravetz's public comment. "We want to take this district into the next century. We owe it to the staff and students to take a look at our facilities and see how we can improve them." Board president Chris Russell agreed with Cook that more specifics were needed. Board member Leslie Edlund said the proposal would have to mesh with the District Advisory Committee's goals. "We've approved a lot of big capital expenditures in the last year, maintaining our buildings," Edlund added. "If there's a way to do that that is less expensive, then I'm all in." The board instructed Superintendent Micheline Miglis to ask Capitol Advisors Group for a more detailed cost analysis and references to call, and to present the revised proposal during the Dec. 11 meeting. State announces new science standard guidelines State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Torlakson said the state is one step closer to implementing the California Next Generation Science Standards as the state Board of Education recently adopted a new plan. "This plan lays out what the state, districts and the community can do to ensure that the exciting new science standards are implemented smoothly," said Torlakson. "These standards will provide all students with a deeper understanding of science so they are better prepared for college and careers, including jobs in the high-technology fields." The NGSS Systems Implementation Plan for California offers school districts and the community strategies on how to provide educators training and resources to teach the new standards. The plan helps districts align local testing to improve teaching and learning. There are also tips on improving communication; how to get everyone to work together; and using the new standards in before- and after-school programs. The state NGSS moves away from teaching science by rote memorization in a single subject matter, and now teaches students how to use analytical skills learned in several subject matters to understand the world around them. For example, NGSS integrates engineering and technology practices to help students understand science and the natural world. NGSS also connects students with the Common Core state standards, which officials say teach them 21st-century skills needed for college and careers. Industries relying on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) subjects are major drivers of California's economy. A 2011 U.S. Department of Commerce study found that over the last decade, the number of STEM jobs grew three times faster than that of jobs in other occupations, and they will continue to outpace non-STEM jobs in the next decade.