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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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Teather River Bulletin Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 11A Quincy couple adopts puppy from Rwanda James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Taking a cue from Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Quincy residents Jeb Heiman and Lindsey Kimzey adopted someone from out of the country. This isn't your typical adoption, however. The couple adopted a dog named Intore from Rwanda. Kimzey saw a photo of Intore posted on the Facebook page of a foster home for dogs in Rwanda's capital, Kigali. Kimzey instantly fell in love with the pup and made the arrangements for the adoption. Last Saturday, Kimzey and Heiman picked Intore up after her long flight to Los Angeles International Airport and brought her back to her new home in Quincy. Darren Beatty, Kimzey and Heiman's friend, heard about their plan to adopt Intore and jumped on the opportunity to give a Rwandan dog a home himself. In addition to Intore, Kimzey picked up a dog named Amani for Beatty last weekend. The shelter Frances Klinck opened the first dog shelter in Rwanda in October last year. Klinck and her husband arrived in Rwanda five years ago and were struck by the treatment of animals dogs in particular. "The streets of Rwanda are not dog-friendly," said Klinck. "The history is complicated and dogs are generally feared and often victims of horrific abuse." According to an article Published by the Chicago Tribune on Sept. 28, 2013, during the 1994 genocide, dogs were often abandoned when families fled the country. "With nothing else to eat, the animals either starved or scavenged on what they could find to survive, including human remains. When the genocide finally ended, dogs were vilified for this practice. This disgust lingers in Rwandan culture,:: the article reads ............. For five years', Klinck and her husband took in stray dogs, and informally found homes for pups they found on the sides of roads. Last year, an experience with a stray prompted them to take further action. "In October 2013 we got a call about a stray dog, Kojo, that had been hit by a car, was gravely injured and left for dead," said Klinck. "He lay on the road for almost a week with compound fractures and infected wounds before a young Rwandan man decided to take action." Through social media and the help of a vet, the Rwandan man found Klinck, who agreed to take on the intensive care of the dog. An American vet, Jodi Garbe, provided Kojo's care almost completely free of charge and worked tirelessly to save his life. "Unfortunately his story doesn't have a fairy tale ending "It is sometimes dim'cult to find good homes for our pups, which are all from the streets. We know that Intore will have a great life with Lindz and Jeb and we are so happy for her/" Neha Bliandari WAG puppy rescue and after weeks he ended up being euthanized," Klinck continued. "The experience made us more aware than ever of the plight of street dogs in Rwanda and as a result we decided to launch a puppy rescue." Klinck opened her basement to 10 dogs to begin with, providing shelter, food, vet care and love. For the fn'st time, there was a system for supporting street dogs in Rwanda. Klinck decided to name the shelter after the happiest expression of a dog WAG. Since Klinck.opened the doors of WAG, the shelter has adopted out 93 dogs. WAG's long-term vision is to develop spay and neuter campaigns, along with changing the mentality in Kigali toward dogs. Kimzey and Intore Klinck traveled to Canada, putting her friend Neha Bhandari in charge of WAG in her absence. Bhandari posted several photos of her playing with the dogs at the shelter on her Facebook page, available for all her friends to see. Meanwhile in Quincy, Kimzey and Heiman debated adopting a dog. One day, Kimzey was browsing on Facebook and up popped a photo of her friend Bhandari with a bunch of puppies. Kimzey clicked on a link posted to her friend's page and saw photos of the puppies up for adoption at WAG. She immediately fell in love with Intore. The puppy had recently arrived at WAG's shelter. The volunteers at WAG named her Intore,=.th_e nae of aadiJi0n Rwandan dance. Kimzey messaged Bhandari, saying she wanted to adopt Intore. It just so happened that Bhandari was planning to come back to visit California on Nov. 15. Kimzey said she would be happy to meet Bhandari and Intore at the airport and both started the process of making the adoption happen. It ended up being easier than both thought to arrange the adoption. All that was required to get Intore and Amani on the plane with Bhandari was proof Of a rabies vaccination and a health certificate, along with baggage costs no quarantining necessary. The shelter says there is no risk of the dogs bringing Ebola to Quincy. At the time of writing, there have been no reported outbreaks in Rwanda. Also, it has not been proved that dogs can carry or shed the virus. "In general Lindsey and Jeb are doing a great thing by taking Intore in," said Bhandari. "It is sometimes difficult to find good homes for our pups, which are all from the streets. We know that Intore will have a great life with Lindz and Jeb and we are so happy for her!" Last weekend Kimzey and Heiman made their way to Bakersfield to meet up with Bhandari and pick up the newest additions to their and Nominations sought for person, business of year As the Wassail Bowl quickly approaches, the time for nominations to come out for Person of the Year and Business of the Year is upon Plumas County. The Quincy Chamber of Commerce plans the annual Wassail Bowl, the chamber function that recognizes excellence in business and community, set to take place at the Plumas County Museum on Dec. 12. Last year, Kris MiravaUe was awarded Person of the Year and Pangaea Caf and Pub was awarded Business of the Year. Those wishing to make nominations can email the name of the person or business they wish to nominate, along with a written description detailing why the aforementioned deserves a nomination. Nominations can be emailed to quincychamber@yahoo.com or sent to P.O. Box 215, Quincy, CA 95971. Elks to serve Thanksgiving Dinner z Quincy Elks Lodge No. 1884 Will be serving Thanksgiving dinner Thursday, Nov. 27. Doors open at 1 p.m. for hors d'oeuvres and beverages; dinner will be served at 3 p.m. A no-host full bar will be open, and football will be playing on TV. The meal is free to all; however, the Elks welcome donations. All money from donations will go to Christmas baskets that are given out to those in need in the community. RSVP is required by Nov. 24: contact Bill LaMar, 249-9214, or the Elks Lodge, 283-1680. The Elks will also be accepting dry, boxed and canned goods for the Christmas baskets. These donations may be dropped off at the Ranchito Motel or the Elks Lodge any time before Christmas. Beatty's families. On Sunday, the couple brought the pups back to their new home in Quincy. "I'm really excited," said Kimzey. "We wanted a puppy for a really long time, and this opportunity just kind of fell on our lap." WAG is always readily accepting donations in any amount for food, vet costs and medicine. Those interested can donate through PayPal using WAG's email address, wag.kiagli@gmail.com. To see photos of puppies at WAG still up for adoption, go to WAG's Facebook page. Those who would like to adopt one of these puppies can email Bhandari at the address listed previously. Bhandari plans to make another trip back to California in February and can bring two puppies back with her. Rwandan dogs Intore and Amani check out the U.S. for the first time after, the long flight from Rwanda to Los Angeles. Quicy's Jeb Heiman and Lindsey Kimzey picked the dogs up from Southern California after Neha Bhandari and her husband Shane McGee brought the puppies back with them from Rwanda. From left: Heiman, Kimzey, Bhandari and McGee. Photo submitted We're asking each of you to spend at least $100 of your holiday shopping budget right here in Plumas County, Why? If each of our readers* spent $100 in Plumas County it would put $1,853,000 back into our local economy, We would be keeping our money here...right here in our own community, We can do this even with simple things like getting our cars serviced or our hair done ,before we travel, "8o$od on an average of two readers per newspaper, Help your community prosper by shopping locally, If you do, we will all be helping each other. Isn't that what the holidays are all about? FEATHER PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. Feather River Bulletin Portola Reporter Indian Valley Record Chester Progressive A ! P i Teather River Bulletin Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 11A Quincy couple adopts puppy from Rwanda James Wilson Staff Writer jwilson@plumasnews.com Taking a cue from Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt, Quincy residents Jeb Heiman and Lindsey Kimzey adopted someone from out of the country. This isn't your typical adoption, however. The couple adopted a dog named Intore from Rwanda. Kimzey saw a photo of Intore posted on the Facebook page of a foster home for dogs in Rwanda's capital, Kigali. Kimzey instantly fell in love with the pup and made the arrangements for the adoption. Last Saturday, Kimzey and Heiman picked Intore up after her long flight to Los Angeles International Airport and brought her back to her new home in Quincy. Darren Beatty, Kimzey and Heiman's friend, heard about their plan to adopt Intore and jumped on the opportunity to give a Rwandan dog a home himself. In addition to Intore, Kimzey picked up a dog named Amani for Beatty last weekend. The shelter Frances Klinck opened the first dog shelter in Rwanda in October last year. Klinck and her husband arrived in Rwanda five years ago and were struck by the treatment of animals dogs in particular. "The streets of Rwanda are not dog-friendly," said Klinck. "The history is complicated and dogs are generally feared and often victims of horrific abuse." According to an article Published by the Chicago Tribune on Sept. 28, 2013, during the 1994 genocide, dogs were often abandoned when families fled the country. "With nothing else to eat, the animals either starved or scavenged on what they could find to survive, including human remains. When the genocide finally ended, dogs were vilified for this practice. This disgust lingers in Rwandan culture,:: the article reads ............. For five years', Klinck and her husband took in stray dogs, and informally found homes for pups they found on the sides of roads. Last year, an experience with a stray prompted them to take further action. "In October 2013 we got a call about a stray dog, Kojo, that had been hit by a car, was gravely injured and left for dead," said Klinck. "He lay on the road for almost a week with compound fractures and infected wounds before a young Rwandan man decided to take action." Through social media and the help of a vet, the Rwandan man found Klinck, who agreed to take on the intensive care of the dog. An American vet, Jodi Garbe, provided Kojo's care almost completely free of charge and worked tirelessly to save his life. "Unfortunately his story doesn't have a fairy tale ending "It is sometimes dim'cult to find good homes for our pups, which are all from the streets. We know that Intore will have a great life with Lindz and Jeb and we are so happy for her/" Neha Bliandari WAG puppy rescue and after weeks he ended up being euthanized," Klinck continued. "The experience made us more aware than ever of the plight of street dogs in Rwanda and as a result we decided to launch a puppy rescue." Klinck opened her basement to 10 dogs to begin with, providing shelter, food, vet care and love. For the fn'st time, there was a system for supporting street dogs in Rwanda. Klinck decided to name the shelter after the happiest expression of a dog WAG. Since Klinck.opened the doors of WAG, the shelter has adopted out 93 dogs. WAG's long-term vision is to develop spay and neuter campaigns, along with changing the mentality in Kigali toward dogs. Kimzey and Intore Klinck traveled to Canada, putting her friend Neha Bhandari in charge of WAG in her absence. Bhandari posted several photos of her playing with the dogs at the shelter on her Facebook page, available for all her friends to see. Meanwhile in Quincy, Kimzey and Heiman debated adopting a dog. One day, Kimzey was browsing on Facebook and up popped a photo of her friend Bhandari with a bunch of puppies. Kimzey clicked on a link posted to her friend's page and saw photos of the puppies up for adoption at WAG. She immediately fell in love with Intore. The puppy had recently arrived at WAG's shelter. The volunteers at WAG named her Intore,=.th_e nae of aadiJi0n Rwandan dance. Kimzey messaged Bhandari, saying she wanted to adopt Intore. It just so happened that Bhandari was planning to come back to visit California on Nov. 15. Kimzey said she would be happy to meet Bhandari and Intore at the airport and both started the process of making the adoption happen. It ended up being easier than both thought to arrange the adoption. All that was required to get Intore and Amani on the plane with Bhandari was proof Of a rabies vaccination and a health certificate, along with baggage costs no quarantining necessary. The shelter says there is no risk of the dogs bringing Ebola to Quincy. At the time of writing, there have been no reported outbreaks in Rwanda. Also, it has not been proved that dogs can carry or shed the virus. "In general Lindsey and Jeb are doing a great thing by taking Intore in," said Bhandari. "It is sometimes difficult to find good homes for our pups, which are all from the streets. We know that Intore will have a great life with Lindz and Jeb and we are so happy for her!" Last weekend Kimzey and Heiman made their way to Bakersfield to meet up with Bhandari and pick up the newest additions to their and Nominations sought for person, business of year As the Wassail Bowl quickly approaches, the time for nominations to come out for Person of the Year and Business of the Year is upon Plumas County. The Quincy Chamber of Commerce plans the annual Wassail Bowl, the chamber function that recognizes excellence in business and community, set to take place at the Plumas County Museum on Dec. 12. Last year, Kris MiravaUe was awarded Person of the Year and Pangaea Caf and Pub was awarded Business of the Year. Those wishing to make nominations can email the name of the person or business they wish to nominate, along with a written description detailing why the aforementioned deserves a nomination. Nominations can be emailed to quincychamber@yahoo.com or sent to P.O. Box 215, Quincy, CA 95971. Elks to serve Thanksgiving Dinner z Quincy Elks Lodge No. 1884 Will be serving Thanksgiving dinner Thursday, Nov. 27. Doors open at 1 p.m. for hors d'oeuvres and beverages; dinner will be served at 3 p.m. A no-host full bar will be open, and football will be playing on TV. The meal is free to all; however, the Elks welcome donations. All money from donations will go to Christmas baskets that are given out to those in need in the community. RSVP is required by Nov. 24: contact Bill LaMar, 249-9214, or the Elks Lodge, 283-1680. The Elks will also be accepting dry, boxed and canned goods for the Christmas baskets. These donations may be dropped off at the Ranchito Motel or the Elks Lodge any time before Christmas. Beatty's families. On Sunday, the couple brought the pups back to their new home in Quincy. "I'm really excited," said Kimzey. "We wanted a puppy for a really long time, and this opportunity just kind of fell on our lap." WAG is always readily accepting donations in any amount for food, vet costs and medicine. Those interested can donate through PayPal using WAG's email address, wag.kiagli@gmail.com. To see photos of puppies at WAG still up for adoption, go to WAG's Facebook page. Those who would like to adopt one of these puppies can email Bhandari at the address listed previously. Bhandari plans to make another trip back to California in February and can bring two puppies back with her. Rwandan dogs Intore and Amani check out the U.S. for the first time after, the long flight from Rwanda to Los Angeles. Quicy's Jeb Heiman and Lindsey Kimzey picked the dogs up from Southern California after Neha Bhandari and her husband Shane McGee brought the puppies back with them from Rwanda. From left: Heiman, Kimzey, Bhandari and McGee. Photo submitted We're asking each of you to spend at least $100 of your holiday shopping budget right here in Plumas County, Why? If each of our readers* spent $100 in Plumas County it would put $1,853,000 back into our local economy, We would be keeping our money here...right here in our own community, We can do this even with simple things like getting our cars serviced or our hair done ,before we travel, "8o$od on an average of two readers per newspaper, Help your community prosper by shopping locally, If you do, we will all be helping each other. Isn't that what the holidays are all about? FEATHER PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. Feather River Bulletin Portola Reporter Indian Valley Record Chester Progressive A ! P i