Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
Lyft
November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
PAGE 13     (13 of 32 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 13     (13 of 32 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
November 19, 2014
 

Newspaper Archive of Feather River Bulletin produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 1B REGIONAL "Peanut" learns from Seth Easley, who volunteered for 2-112 months in China. Easley and his fellow volunteers gave endearing nicknames to the|r students. Photos by Easley Intriguing architecture lures tourists tO the city of Xi'an, China. 6,000 miles from Green "lie Indian Valley resident shares his experience as volunteer in China Villagers cram into a bus for their daily commute in China. The Chinese terra-cotta army "marches" into the afterlife with Emperor Qin of Xi'an. These are only a few of thousands of statues unearthed in 1974. Miriam S. Cody Staff Writer mcody@plumasnews.com hree months ago, 18-year-old Seth Easley got on a plane for the first time ever and flew all the way to China to teach children with special needs and to volunteer in schools. He returned home to Greenville two weeks ago. Christine Easley, Seth's mother, said, "I think it's pretty neat that a kid who graduated in such a small town, with a graduating class of 10, went over 6,500 miles away to learn about another culture." Easley always knew he wanted to travel after high school. So, when he graduated from GHS in June, he started looking into international experiences as an exchange student. He decided it wasn't for him, however. Then he found International Volunteer Headquarters. IVHQ was a more affordable option with food and lodging provided to those who volunteer. Easley spent the first three weeks of his trip in the city of Xi'an. He was assigned to a special needs school there, where children are sometimes simply abandoned by their parents, dropped off and left to live on their own. The school is funded entirely by donations and operated by volunteers. Easley said, "It was very sad. The parents just drop them off and never come back. The food was gross." He said the children at the school were "skin and bones." He was grateful for an opportunity to make a difference in their lives, and became close friends with another volunteer in the program. Brad, who is from Florida, will be coming to Greenville to visit in March. Three weeks after he arrived in Xi'an, Easley traveled to the village of Weinan, where he worked at an elementary school teaching English to students ranging from kindergarten to second grade. "They call it a village," said Easley, "but there are 500,000 people there." This came as quite a change for a young man who grew up in a town of just over 1,000 residents. "It's so different and completely exotic," he said. The kids Easley bonded with the students he taught during his stay in Weinan. He walked through the school in the mornings and the kids would run up and jump at him, excited to see him. He said a lot of them came to the village from smaller settlements and lived there, away from their families. The roughly 500 children enrolled in the school attend classes from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. The students, who range in age from kindergarten to eighth grade, all eat, sleep and learn together on campus. "They just threw us in a classroom and said, 'OK, teach!'" Seth Easley hangs out with "Bo-Bo," the "smartest student in his class," in the village of Weinan, China. Easley said. He said he did a lot of pointing at things and saying the English word for the objects, without a clue what the Chinese word was, although he did pick up some of the language during his visit. The culture Easley said he and Brad were the only foreigners in the entire city of Weinan. He embraced the opportunity to try new things. He got a tattoo, his third, of the Chinese symbol for "faith." He ate a fried chicken foot. He browsed through a Chinese Wal-Mart, which was stacked up on three levels in a crowded city block, unlike American Wal-Marts. He almost got lost, he said, trying to get out! "Hot pot" is Easley's new favorite authentic Chinese dish. "1 would encourage anv00oav, especially from our small town, to go out and do something fike that (volunteer in China). lt mally broadens your horizons." Seth Easley Karaoke bars were much different, he said, and much nicer in China than they typically are here. Parties for karaoke come into a club and get their own private room, and free beer. He dined at various restaurants in Weinan, and found tha his new favorite Asian dish is "hot pot," a soup-like meal of meat and vegetables chosen by the customer and cooked right there in front of him. "I didn't know how different it was going to be over there, and it made me appreciate where I live, in the states," Easley said. While in Xi'an, Easley viewed the famous Chinese terra-cotta army. In 1974, workers digging a well outside the city discovered a life-sized soldier made of clay. Further investigation by archaeologists unearthed thousands more of the clay warriors, poised for battle. Each was unique in its facial features and clothes, and some held weapons m pristine condition. They also found horse-drawn chariots made of clay. The dig has been preserved as a museum, and Easley spent some time fascinamd by the detail and intricacy of the statues. Around 200 B.C., the first emperor of the City ordered 700,000 workers to build the army, which he believed would accompany him into the afterlife. Archaeologists estimate the pits may contain as many as 8,000 figures, some of them still buried, but the total may neverbe known. The future Easley is headed to Feather River College in the fall. "I'm not really sure what I want m pursue," he said. For now, he's just going to keep learning and experiencing new things. "I would encourage anybody, especially from our small town, to go out and do something like that. It really broadens your horizons." IVHQ IVHQ provides affordable and safe volunteer programs in 28 countries around the world. Established in 2007, it is the world's leading volunteer travel company. Projects include teaching, child care, community development, medical services, construction, renovation and wildlife conservation. For more information, visit volunteerhq.org. Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 1B REGIONAL "Peanut" learns from Seth Easley, who volunteered for 2-112 months in China. Easley and his fellow volunteers gave endearing nicknames to the|r students. Photos by Easley Intriguing architecture lures tourists tO the city of Xi'an, China. 6,000 miles from Green "lie Indian Valley resident shares his experience as volunteer in China Villagers cram into a bus for their daily commute in China. The Chinese terra-cotta army "marches" into the afterlife with Emperor Qin of Xi'an. These are only a few of thousands of statues unearthed in 1974. Miriam S. Cody Staff Writer mcody@plumasnews.com hree months ago, 18-year-old Seth Easley got on a plane for the first time ever and flew all the way to China to teach children with special needs and to volunteer in schools. He returned home to Greenville two weeks ago. Christine Easley, Seth's mother, said, "I think it's pretty neat that a kid who graduated in such a small town, with a graduating class of 10, went over 6,500 miles away to learn about another culture." Easley always knew he wanted to travel after high school. So, when he graduated from GHS in June, he started looking into international experiences as an exchange student. He decided it wasn't for him, however. Then he found International Volunteer Headquarters. IVHQ was a more affordable option with food and lodging provided to those who volunteer. Easley spent the first three weeks of his trip in the city of Xi'an. He was assigned to a special needs school there, where children are sometimes simply abandoned by their parents, dropped off and left to live on their own. The school is funded entirely by donations and operated by volunteers. Easley said, "It was very sad. The parents just drop them off and never come back. The food was gross." He said the children at the school were "skin and bones." He was grateful for an opportunity to make a difference in their lives, and became close friends with another volunteer in the program. Brad, who is from Florida, will be coming to Greenville to visit in March. Three weeks after he arrived in Xi'an, Easley traveled to the village of Weinan, where he worked at an elementary school teaching English to students ranging from kindergarten to second grade. "They call it a village," said Easley, "but there are 500,000 people there." This came as quite a change for a young man who grew up in a town of just over 1,000 residents. "It's so different and completely exotic," he said. The kids Easley bonded with the students he taught during his stay in Weinan. He walked through the school in the mornings and the kids would run up and jump at him, excited to see him. He said a lot of them came to the village from smaller settlements and lived there, away from their families. The roughly 500 children enrolled in the school attend classes from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. The students, who range in age from kindergarten to eighth grade, all eat, sleep and learn together on campus. "They just threw us in a classroom and said, 'OK, teach!'" Seth Easley hangs out with "Bo-Bo," the "smartest student in his class," in the village of Weinan, China. Easley said. He said he did a lot of pointing at things and saying the English word for the objects, without a clue what the Chinese word was, although he did pick up some of the language during his visit. The culture Easley said he and Brad were the only foreigners in the entire city of Weinan. He embraced the opportunity to try new things. He got a tattoo, his third, of the Chinese symbol for "faith." He ate a fried chicken foot. He browsed through a Chinese Wal-Mart, which was stacked up on three levels in a crowded city block, unlike American Wal-Marts. He almost got lost, he said, trying to get out! "Hot pot" is Easley's new favorite authentic Chinese dish. "1 would encourage anv00oav, especially from our small town, to go out and do something fike that (volunteer in China). lt mally broadens your horizons." Seth Easley Karaoke bars were much different, he said, and much nicer in China than they typically are here. Parties for karaoke come into a club and get their own private room, and free beer. He dined at various restaurants in Weinan, and found tha his new favorite Asian dish is "hot pot," a soup-like meal of meat and vegetables chosen by the customer and cooked right there in front of him. "I didn't know how different it was going to be over there, and it made me appreciate where I live, in the states," Easley said. While in Xi'an, Easley viewed the famous Chinese terra-cotta army. In 1974, workers digging a well outside the city discovered a life-sized soldier made of clay. Further investigation by archaeologists unearthed thousands more of the clay warriors, poised for battle. Each was unique in its facial features and clothes, and some held weapons m pristine condition. They also found horse-drawn chariots made of clay. The dig has been preserved as a museum, and Easley spent some time fascinamd by the detail and intricacy of the statues. Around 200 B.C., the first emperor of the City ordered 700,000 workers to build the army, which he believed would accompany him into the afterlife. Archaeologists estimate the pits may contain as many as 8,000 figures, some of them still buried, but the total may neverbe known. The future Easley is headed to Feather River College in the fall. "I'm not really sure what I want m pursue," he said. For now, he's just going to keep learning and experiencing new things. "I would encourage anybody, especially from our small town, to go out and do something like that. It really broadens your horizons." IVHQ IVHQ provides affordable and safe volunteer programs in 28 countries around the world. Established in 2007, it is the world's leading volunteer travel company. Projects include teaching, child care, community development, medical services, construction, renovation and wildlife conservation. For more information, visit volunteerhq.org.