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8B Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter EDITORIAL AND OPINION EDITORIAL We have much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving Harvest celebrations are probably as old as civilization, but here in America, we celebrate Thanksgiving Day based on the history and legends of that first Thanksgiving back in 1621 following a brutal winter in which the Pilgrims and the other colonists who arrived on the Mayflower in December 1620 lost nearly half of the original party. Historians suggest the colonists probably would not have survived at all had the Native Americans not helped them and showed them how to grow food on the new and foreign continent. The celebration back in 1621 lasted for three days and 91 Native Americans joined in the festivities. Not only was there a place for everyone at the table, everyone contributed to the feast. According to Pilgrim Edward Winslow's first-hand account, the governor sent men "fowling," and they came back with many birds. The Native Americans killed five deer and brought them to the feast. Winslow's account set the tone for the celebration. "And although it be not always so plentiful," he wrote, "as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty." William Bradford also recalled that first Thanksgiving celebration. "They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty," Bradford wrote. "And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports." Our In'st president, George Washington, proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving in' 1789, but it wasn't until 1863 that President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving. President Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the date to the next-to-last Thursday in November, and in 1941 Congress created a legal holiday on the fourth Thursday in November. As hard as it might be for us to imagine the lffert, hratn;qh, e.g$ tose Pilgrim settlers ..... fad&i'lflith'preari&is hbld on the edgeof - the New World, they probably could never have imagined the holiday that has grown from their first Thanksgiving in this new and wondrous land and the way their celebration inspired the beginning of a festive holiday season we Americans take for granted because it is so familiar to us. This Thursday as you gather with your families, friends and loved ones to celebrate our modern Thanksgiving Day, we hope you will pause for a moment or two and offer thanks for the many blessings that have been bestowed on us this past year. Who knows what this great land would have become had the Pilgrims not arrived on our Eastern shores that cold December day and if the Native Americans had not helped them learn to survive in a new land. To all our readers, we wish you and yours a very happy, joyous and wonderful Thanksgiving holiday as we pause from our labors to give thanks this Thursday. Feat :00bllshm00 ,0000,'0000qgwspaper For breaking news, go to plumasnews.com Michael C. Taborski .............. Publisher Keri B. Taborski .... Lega ! Advertising Dept. Dan McDonald .......... Managing Editor Jenny Lee .................. Photo Editor Ingrid Burke .................. Copy Editor i Staff writers: Miriam Cody Michael Condon Makenzie Davis Ruth Ellis Will Farris Susan Cort Johnson Greg Knight Feather River Bulletin (530) 283-0800 Portola Reporter (530) 832-4646 Lassen County Times (530) 257-5321 Debra Moore Maddie Musante Ann Powers M. Kate West Aura Whittaker Sam Williams James Wilson Indian Valley Record (530) 284-7800 Chester Progressive (530) 258-3115 Westwood PinePress (530) 256-2277 Printed on recycled paper  imimTED nl I00Yml .ember, California Newspaper Publishers Assoc. "Noshem ber" reawakens my love of the "stache By "Noshember," I mean No-Shave November, a trend that started in the fall of 2009. Cancer research supporters Rebecca Hill and Bret Ringdahl came up with a plan to encourage people, regardless of age, gender or income level, to donate to their cause. They figured if people simply didn't shave or get their hair done for one month, the money saved on grooming supplies could be donated to help cancer patients and their families. Over the years, No-Shave November has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, and inspired hundreds of thousands of furry, warm faces. Things really took off in 2013, when the organization that started as a humble Facebook page partnered with the American Cancer Society to help distribute funds appropriately. MY TURN MIRIAM S. CODY Staff Writer mcody@plumasnews.com I started seeing some of the coolest dudes in town with their handlebars twisted up nice or left bushy and beardless a la Tom Selleck, setting the quirky trend among a generation formerly focused on goatees and piercings as attention-getters. One day my better half, Larry, left his upper lip alone too long and I had a vision of the Rhett-Butler-looking, distinguished gentleman he was with a 'stache, and everything changed. Now he can't come out of the bathroom baby-faced without a "where'd your mustache go?" comment from me. I just dig the 'stache, OK? I'm for it, though not so much that I actually drink my coffee from a mustache cup or anything. Swear. Some guys symbolize their 'staches as I 'mustache' this one question: While Noshember is an easily understood, logical and fun way to raise funds and celebrate the hair thatmany cancer sufferers lose, what is up with mustaches? I started seeing the trend rise last winter in Montana, when I went into Hastings or Barnes and Noble and was bombarded by greeting cards, drinking glasses, T-shirts, cellphone cases.., all featuring mustache silhouettes or some kind of mustache theme. This week's special days NOT JUST AN ORDINARY DAY COMPILED BY KERI TABORSKI November 20 1969 -- Native American activists seize control of Alcatraz Island. (They are ousted by the United States government in June 1971.) 1985 -- Microsoft Windows 1.0 is released. November 21 1789 -- North Carolina, "The Tar Heel State," is admitted into the Union as the 12th state. 1877 -- Thomas Edison invents the gramophone, or the phonograph, a machine that can both record and play sound. November 22 1954 -- The Humane Society of the United States is founded, promoting animal welfare and animal rights with the motto: Celebrating animals -- Confronting cruelty." 1963 -- President John F. Kennedy was , :.asinated ir Dal}as,.Texas. 1977-- British Airways inaugurates the Concorde's London to New York service. 1995 -- "Toy Story" is released as the first feature length film created completely using computer-generated imagery. Not just an ordinary day....a sampling of weekly notable special days and facts throughout the year. November 19 1903 -- Monopoly is created and later patented as a Parker Brothers board game (1935). It is now played with eight tokens: a wheelbarrow, a battleship, a racecar, a thimble, a shoe, a Scottish terrier, a top hat, and a cat (which was added in 2013). Previous tokens retired and replaced in 1950 were the lantern, a purse and a rocking horse. 1959 -- Ford Motor Company announces th discor/tinuafion of its unpopular automobile, the Edsel. 1998 -- Lewinsky-Clinton scandal emerges and the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Commission begins impeachment hearings against President Bill Clinton support for testicular cancer patients, I learned. This is the "Movember" revolution, a spin-off of Noshember. But it doesn't fully explain the phenomenon. My niece, Ramona, has always had a little mustaphobia (fear of the 'stache, for lack of a more accurate psychological term). She said they just made her a little nervous. On top of that, I watched my friend Windy's 2-year-old daughter slap her silly, in panic, the other day. The child was unable to accept the stick-on 'stache on her mother's face at a party! I don't see the reason behind her sudden 'stacheback (a flashback to the horrifying episode of Smurfs where Gargamel almost wins), except that perhaps those girls are too young to understand that Walter Cronkite proved years ago mustaches are indeed trustworthy. I guess we just shouldn't underestimate the power of the mustache. Maybe they got a bad rap over the years. John Dillinger, the Unibomber, and other unsavory characters like Captain Crunch with his crunch-berry stealing ways might have turned Americans against the 'stache. But we mustn't forget heroes like Doc Holliday, Captain Jack Sparrow and Waylon Jennings, who is, forever, "just a good o1' boy, never meanin' no harm." Mustaches can keep a lip warm in the winter, punctuate a witty comment with a twist of the sides, and propel a woman with unbalanced testosterone levels to stardom in the circus. They can act as a disguise or an accessory, or become a signature part of a loved one's face. I never, not even once, saw my father without his. I imagine if I had, as a young 'un, I might have had the same kind of reaction my friend's kid did to his strange, new mug. The choice of facial punctuation has been noted throughout history, and we all know the type of'stache no one can sport without things getting awkward. Thanks a lot, Adolf, for ruining the fun again. Still, the options abound. There's the Teddy Roosevelt, the Pancho Villa, the Genghis Khan. Wyatt Earp nailed the proper cowboy look for the likes of our locals, and I do see those silver handlebars all over Plumas County, looking downright fierce. If I were a damsel in distress, I'd seek the assistance of one of those Hulk Hogans above some bare-lipped greenhorn any day. Although I do not fully understand the growing mustache trend, I am not against it. In fact, now that I've explored my feelings about mustaches while writing this, I guess I can sea,how people got so .  e.*llU,llll the In'st place. HecK I might even grow mine out! Just kidding.., but since I usually cut my own hair anyway, I will ask one of my girlfriends what she spent on her last outing to the salon and donate that much to ACS. Every whisker counts! To donate, go to No-Shave.org. REMEMBER WHEN KERI TABORSKI Historian 75 YEARS AGO ..... 1939 Portola Water Company moved its business office into a new building on California St. this week. In addition to the office, a sleeping room and bathroom are located on the ground floor. A three room apartment occupies the second floor. Western Pacific Railroad's night passenger trains, serving local traffic from Portola to Oakland, will be continued through the winter. Western Pacific's advertising campaign this winter will be directed to developing and promoting snow sports travel to Plumas County. 50 YEARS AGO ..... 1964 The last half of our bound volumes in our archives for the year 1964 (July through December) is missing and those historical items are not available to include in this Remember When column. 25 YEARS AGO ..... 1989 Lt. Donald Stoy, a 19 year veteran of the Plumas County Sheriffs Department, has announced his intention to run for Plumas County Sheriff in the election next June. Former Plumas County Fair Manager, C. W. Adams, is the subject of criminal investigation of his fmancial activities while manager of the Antelope Valley Fair in Lancaster. 10 YEARS AGO ..... 2004 P G & E dropped plans for a proposed thermal curtain project at Lake Almanor. The community bulletin boards at all post offices throughout Plumas County have been removed as a new U.S. Post Office regulation states that displaying notices, advertising, handbills, posters, etc., with the exception of governmental notices, is forbidden. Slowing down means turning off the tech One of the best things about living in Plumas County is the forest. For me, it provides a daily escape from a modern world that moves too fast, smells of car exhaust and buzzes with the unnatural frequencies of overhead power lines. In my life, getting out to the forest is something that saved me and, when combined with a few personal steps to reduce my dependence on technology, has made me a more well-rounded and saner person. The first thing I did, more than six years ago, was to get rid of my television. This was a bold step for me at the time considering I was working full time in TV news in Reno. Looking back, I realize it was a knee-jerk response to what I was seeing from inside the newsroom. I believe broadcast journalism was and still is the biggest lie ever perpetrated on Americans, who, thanks to globalism and the existence ofunelected, non-constitutional bodies like the United Nations, can barely claim to be free citizens anymore. This is the ugly business I was a part Of; from the national stories I pulled down daffy from NBC, AP and Reuters (i.e., the Ministries of Truth) to the pounds of expensive high-definition makeup I had to wear, it soon dawned on me that I was unhappy and compounding the stupidity of the news consumers in Reno. Checklist: TV set gone. Quit broadcast journalism and become a print writer. Check. The next thing that I realized was, even though I was out of TV news, I was still in sOme pretty densely populated areas. After much study and observation I realized that should a great calamity ever befall this nation, from war to pestilence, the cities would become a zoo of mob-mentality MY TURN ..................................................... .2 ..... GREG KNIGHT Sports Writer gknight@plumasnews.com thinking and full of people with too many greedy desires and nothing to lose. Checklist: Get out of city, move to country. Once I was out of the megalopolis, whether it be to the small towns of Alaska, Utah or Northern California, I was able to see that the essentials of food, water, clean air, natural resources like timber and ways to propagate methods and ideologies of renewable energy were everywhere. I didn't need a TV to tell me that I had everything I would ever need to live a fruitful life right here in my backyard. Checklist: Investigate ways to simplify life and still have absolute comfort. Buy land, get solar and water, plant food in the ground. Now that I was on the way toward this auto-utopian dream, there came the boldest move yet as I had to truly endeavor to wean my self from the Internet and smart' technology, why, yotl ask? How could I imagine living without a device that I can live vicariously through? People told me it'll do everything for me except my dishes. Yes, it does a lot, but it will also rule your life if you let it. Sorry, I am old school. I got rid of the iPhone and went for a cheap flip cellphone. Why, you ask again? It costs me $50 a month for a "dumb" phone and, in my opinion, phones are for calling people. Label me a cynical tin-foil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorist for being against smart technology, but I really don't want anyone (NSA) knowing what I read, what ideology I subscribe to or what my GPS coordinates are. Checklist: Avoid smart technology wherever possible. Now that I had done all this, what was the end-game plan for me? What was the dream to be realized and how would I get there? It was an easy question to answer once I was living this slower life, in the woods. I would buy at least 3 acres of treed property somewhere in Plumas County. On that land, situated close to a stream or large body of water, I would install enough solar panels to generate electricity for use at night, when it is needed most. On this land I would also install a gravity-based water distribution system that was barely reliant on AC-powered pumps or valves. Checklist: Land, timber, water and power. The essentials. Double check. I know that the rest of the world is going to get a lot faster before it gets any slower, but I also know for me and those that I love in this world, there will be a place we can be safce, secure, well-fed and showered if the bovine scatology ever hits the proverbial fan. It may seem ironic that I had to write this piece using the Internet and a computer-- but I am not advocating for the complete disuse of such technology. I just choose to use it eight hours a day and no more than that. The best part is this: If this message reaches even one of you and you are able to slow down, just a wee bit, my work here is done. There is plenty to do here without a Wi-Fi connection, 8B Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter EDITORIAL AND OPINION EDITORIAL We have much to be thankful for this Thanksgiving Harvest celebrations are probably as old as civilization, but here in America, we celebrate Thanksgiving Day based on the history and legends of that first Thanksgiving back in 1621 following a brutal winter in which the Pilgrims and the other colonists who arrived on the Mayflower in December 1620 lost nearly half of the original party. Historians suggest the colonists probably would not have survived at all had the Native Americans not helped them and showed them how to grow food on the new and foreign continent. The celebration back in 1621 lasted for three days and 91 Native Americans joined in the festivities. Not only was there a place for everyone at the table, everyone contributed to the feast. According to Pilgrim Edward Winslow's first-hand account, the governor sent men "fowling," and they came back with many birds. The Native Americans killed five deer and brought them to the feast. Winslow's account set the tone for the celebration. "And although it be not always so plentiful," he wrote, "as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty." William Bradford also recalled that first Thanksgiving celebration. "They began now to gather in the small harvest they had, and to fit up their houses and dwellings against winter, being all well recovered in health and strength and had all things in good plenty," Bradford wrote. "And besides waterfowl there was great store of wild turkeys, of which they took many, besides venison, etc. Besides, they had about a peck of meal a week to a person, or now since harvest, Indian corn to that proportion. Which made many afterwards write so largely of their plenty here to their friends in England, which were not feigned but true reports." Our In'st president, George Washington, proclaimed a National Day of Thanksgiving in' 1789, but it wasn't until 1863 that President Lincoln proclaimed the last Thursday in November as Thanksgiving. President Franklin D. Roosevelt changed the date to the next-to-last Thursday in November, and in 1941 Congress created a legal holiday on the fourth Thursday in November. As hard as it might be for us to imagine the lffert, hratn;qh, e.g$ tose Pilgrim settlers ..... fad&i'lflith'preari&is hbld on the edgeof - the New World, they probably could never have imagined the holiday that has grown from their first Thanksgiving in this new and wondrous land and the way their celebration inspired the beginning of a festive holiday season we Americans take for granted because it is so familiar to us. This Thursday as you gather with your families, friends and loved ones to celebrate our modern Thanksgiving Day, we hope you will pause for a moment or two and offer thanks for the many blessings that have been bestowed on us this past year. Who knows what this great land would have become had the Pilgrims not arrived on our Eastern shores that cold December day and if the Native Americans had not helped them learn to survive in a new land. To all our readers, we wish you and yours a very happy, joyous and wonderful Thanksgiving holiday as we pause from our labors to give thanks this Thursday. Feat :00bllshm00 ,0000,'0000qgwspaper For breaking news, go to plumasnews.com Michael C. Taborski .............. Publisher Keri B. Taborski .... Lega ! Advertising Dept. Dan McDonald .......... Managing Editor Jenny Lee .................. Photo Editor Ingrid Burke .................. Copy Editor i Staff writers: Miriam Cody Michael Condon Makenzie Davis Ruth Ellis Will Farris Susan Cort Johnson Greg Knight Feather River Bulletin (530) 283-0800 Portola Reporter (530) 832-4646 Lassen County Times (530) 257-5321 Debra Moore Maddie Musante Ann Powers M. Kate West Aura Whittaker Sam Williams James Wilson Indian Valley Record (530) 284-7800 Chester Progressive (530) 258-3115 Westwood PinePress (530) 256-2277 Printed on recycled paper  imimTED nl I00Yml .ember, California Newspaper Publishers Assoc. "Noshem ber" reawakens my love of the "stache By "Noshember," I mean No-Shave November, a trend that started in the fall of 2009. Cancer research supporters Rebecca Hill and Bret Ringdahl came up with a plan to encourage people, regardless of age, gender or income level, to donate to their cause. They figured if people simply didn't shave or get their hair done for one month, the money saved on grooming supplies could be donated to help cancer patients and their families. Over the years, No-Shave November has raised hundreds of thousands of dollars, and inspired hundreds of thousands of furry, warm faces. Things really took off in 2013, when the organization that started as a humble Facebook page partnered with the American Cancer Society to help distribute funds appropriately. MY TURN MIRIAM S. CODY Staff Writer mcody@plumasnews.com I started seeing some of the coolest dudes in town with their handlebars twisted up nice or left bushy and beardless a la Tom Selleck, setting the quirky trend among a generation formerly focused on goatees and piercings as attention-getters. One day my better half, Larry, left his upper lip alone too long and I had a vision of the Rhett-Butler-looking, distinguished gentleman he was with a 'stache, and everything changed. Now he can't come out of the bathroom baby-faced without a "where'd your mustache go?" comment from me. I just dig the 'stache, OK? I'm for it, though not so much that I actually drink my coffee from a mustache cup or anything. Swear. Some guys symbolize their 'staches as I 'mustache' this one question: While Noshember is an easily understood, logical and fun way to raise funds and celebrate the hair thatmany cancer sufferers lose, what is up with mustaches? I started seeing the trend rise last winter in Montana, when I went into Hastings or Barnes and Noble and was bombarded by greeting cards, drinking glasses, T-shirts, cellphone cases.., all featuring mustache silhouettes or some kind of mustache theme. This week's special days NOT JUST AN ORDINARY DAY COMPILED BY KERI TABORSKI November 20 1969 -- Native American activists seize control of Alcatraz Island. (They are ousted by the United States government in June 1971.) 1985 -- Microsoft Windows 1.0 is released. November 21 1789 -- North Carolina, "The Tar Heel State," is admitted into the Union as the 12th state. 1877 -- Thomas Edison invents the gramophone, or the phonograph, a machine that can both record and play sound. November 22 1954 -- The Humane Society of the United States is founded, promoting animal welfare and animal rights with the motto: Celebrating animals -- Confronting cruelty." 1963 -- President John F. Kennedy was , :.asinated ir Dal}as,.Texas. 1977-- British Airways inaugurates the Concorde's London to New York service. 1995 -- "Toy Story" is released as the first feature length film created completely using computer-generated imagery. Not just an ordinary day....a sampling of weekly notable special days and facts throughout the year. November 19 1903 -- Monopoly is created and later patented as a Parker Brothers board game (1935). It is now played with eight tokens: a wheelbarrow, a battleship, a racecar, a thimble, a shoe, a Scottish terrier, a top hat, and a cat (which was added in 2013). Previous tokens retired and replaced in 1950 were the lantern, a purse and a rocking horse. 1959 -- Ford Motor Company announces th discor/tinuafion of its unpopular automobile, the Edsel. 1998 -- Lewinsky-Clinton scandal emerges and the United States House of Representatives Judiciary Commission begins impeachment hearings against President Bill Clinton support for testicular cancer patients, I learned. This is the "Movember" revolution, a spin-off of Noshember. But it doesn't fully explain the phenomenon. My niece, Ramona, has always had a little mustaphobia (fear of the 'stache, for lack of a more accurate psychological term). She said they just made her a little nervous. On top of that, I watched my friend Windy's 2-year-old daughter slap her silly, in panic, the other day. The child was unable to accept the stick-on 'stache on her mother's face at a party! I don't see the reason behind her sudden 'stacheback (a flashback to the horrifying episode of Smurfs where Gargamel almost wins), except that perhaps those girls are too young to understand that Walter Cronkite proved years ago mustaches are indeed trustworthy. I guess we just shouldn't underestimate the power of the mustache. Maybe they got a bad rap over the years. John Dillinger, the Unibomber, and other unsavory characters like Captain Crunch with his crunch-berry stealing ways might have turned Americans against the 'stache. But we mustn't forget heroes like Doc Holliday, Captain Jack Sparrow and Waylon Jennings, who is, forever, "just a good o1' boy, never meanin' no harm." Mustaches can keep a lip warm in the winter, punctuate a witty comment with a twist of the sides, and propel a woman with unbalanced testosterone levels to stardom in the circus. They can act as a disguise or an accessory, or become a signature part of a loved one's face. I never, not even once, saw my father without his. I imagine if I had, as a young 'un, I might have had the same kind of reaction my friend's kid did to his strange, new mug. The choice of facial punctuation has been noted throughout history, and we all know the type of'stache no one can sport without things getting awkward. Thanks a lot, Adolf, for ruining the fun again. Still, the options abound. There's the Teddy Roosevelt, the Pancho Villa, the Genghis Khan. Wyatt Earp nailed the proper cowboy look for the likes of our locals, and I do see those silver handlebars all over Plumas County, looking downright fierce. If I were a damsel in distress, I'd seek the assistance of one of those Hulk Hogans above some bare-lipped greenhorn any day. Although I do not fully understand the growing mustache trend, I am not against it. In fact, now that I've explored my feelings about mustaches while writing this, I guess I can sea,how people got so .  e.*llU,llll the In'st place. HecK I might even grow mine out! Just kidding.., but since I usually cut my own hair anyway, I will ask one of my girlfriends what she spent on her last outing to the salon and donate that much to ACS. Every whisker counts! To donate, go to No-Shave.org. REMEMBER WHEN KERI TABORSKI Historian 75 YEARS AGO ..... 1939 Portola Water Company moved its business office into a new building on California St. this week. In addition to the office, a sleeping room and bathroom are located on the ground floor. A three room apartment occupies the second floor. Western Pacific Railroad's night passenger trains, serving local traffic from Portola to Oakland, will be continued through the winter. Western Pacific's advertising campaign this winter will be directed to developing and promoting snow sports travel to Plumas County. 50 YEARS AGO ..... 1964 The last half of our bound volumes in our archives for the year 1964 (July through December) is missing and those historical items are not available to include in this Remember When column. 25 YEARS AGO ..... 1989 Lt. Donald Stoy, a 19 year veteran of the Plumas County Sheriffs Department, has announced his intention to run for Plumas County Sheriff in the election next June. Former Plumas County Fair Manager, C. W. Adams, is the subject of criminal investigation of his fmancial activities while manager of the Antelope Valley Fair in Lancaster. 10 YEARS AGO ..... 2004 P G & E dropped plans for a proposed thermal curtain project at Lake Almanor. The community bulletin boards at all post offices throughout Plumas County have been removed as a new U.S. Post Office regulation states that displaying notices, advertising, handbills, posters, etc., with the exception of governmental notices, is forbidden. Slowing down means turning off the tech One of the best things about living in Plumas County is the forest. For me, it provides a daily escape from a modern world that moves too fast, smells of car exhaust and buzzes with the unnatural frequencies of overhead power lines. In my life, getting out to the forest is something that saved me and, when combined with a few personal steps to reduce my dependence on technology, has made me a more well-rounded and saner person. The first thing I did, more than six years ago, was to get rid of my television. This was a bold step for me at the time considering I was working full time in TV news in Reno. Looking back, I realize it was a knee-jerk response to what I was seeing from inside the newsroom. I believe broadcast journalism was and still is the biggest lie ever perpetrated on Americans, who, thanks to globalism and the existence ofunelected, non-constitutional bodies like the United Nations, can barely claim to be free citizens anymore. This is the ugly business I was a part Of; from the national stories I pulled down daffy from NBC, AP and Reuters (i.e., the Ministries of Truth) to the pounds of expensive high-definition makeup I had to wear, it soon dawned on me that I was unhappy and compounding the stupidity of the news consumers in Reno. Checklist: TV set gone. Quit broadcast journalism and become a print writer. Check. The next thing that I realized was, even though I was out of TV news, I was still in sOme pretty densely populated areas. After much study and observation I realized that should a great calamity ever befall this nation, from war to pestilence, the cities would become a zoo of mob-mentality MY TURN ..................................................... .2 ..... GREG KNIGHT Sports Writer gknight@plumasnews.com thinking and full of people with too many greedy desires and nothing to lose. Checklist: Get out of city, move to country. Once I was out of the megalopolis, whether it be to the small towns of Alaska, Utah or Northern California, I was able to see that the essentials of food, water, clean air, natural resources like timber and ways to propagate methods and ideologies of renewable energy were everywhere. I didn't need a TV to tell me that I had everything I would ever need to live a fruitful life right here in my backyard. Checklist: Investigate ways to simplify life and still have absolute comfort. Buy land, get solar and water, plant food in the ground. Now that I was on the way toward this auto-utopian dream, there came the boldest move yet as I had to truly endeavor to wean my self from the Internet and smart' technology, why, yotl ask? How could I imagine living without a device that I can live vicariously through? People told me it'll do everything for me except my dishes. Yes, it does a lot, but it will also rule your life if you let it. Sorry, I am old school. I got rid of the iPhone and went for a cheap flip cellphone. Why, you ask again? It costs me $50 a month for a "dumb" phone and, in my opinion, phones are for calling people. Label me a cynical tin-foil-hat-wearing conspiracy theorist for being against smart technology, but I really don't want anyone (NSA) knowing what I read, what ideology I subscribe to or what my GPS coordinates are. Checklist: Avoid smart technology wherever possible. Now that I had done all this, what was the end-game plan for me? What was the dream to be realized and how would I get there? It was an easy question to answer once I was living this slower life, in the woods. I would buy at least 3 acres of treed property somewhere in Plumas County. On that land, situated close to a stream or large body of water, I would install enough solar panels to generate electricity for use at night, when it is needed most. On this land I would also install a gravity-based water distribution system that was barely reliant on AC-powered pumps or valves. Checklist: Land, timber, water and power. The essentials. Double check. I know that the rest of the world is going to get a lot faster before it gets any slower, but I also know for me and those that I love in this world, there will be a place we can be safce, secure, well-fed and showered if the bovine scatology ever hits the proverbial fan. It may seem ironic that I had to write this piece using the Internet and a computer-- but I am not advocating for the complete disuse of such technology. I just choose to use it eight hours a day and no more than that. The best part is this: If this message reaches even one of you and you are able to slow down, just a wee bit, my work here is done. There is plenty to do here without a Wi-Fi connection,