Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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November 19, 2014
 

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lOB Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter depart7 00ents, medical responders have long association Why does your local fire department respond ff you need emergency medical care? Why do they usually come with a fire engine in addition to the ambulance? Ever wonder what an "EMT" is? How about a "first responder"? And what about a "paramedic"? How do our local firefighters fit into these roles in Plumas County? And, perhaps the most important question, why is your local fire department even providing this service? Fire service roots in providing emergency medical aid go very deep, and can be traced at least as far back as the Middle Ages. The Knights of Malta became a charitabl, nonmilitary organization during the llth and 12th centuries, providing aid to the sick and poor and helping to set up numerous hospitals. They would later join the knights of the Crusades in battles to win back the Holy Land. They wore crimson-colored capes over suits of armor. This provided a defense against fire, one of the newest weapons of war. As invading forces attacked a castle, the defenders would throw down containers of naphtha and other flammable liquids. Once the armies were soaked, a torch would be hurled at the attackers, igniting their fuel-soaked clothing. With their fellow troops then on fire, the Knights of Malta would approach on horseback, rip off their capes, and use them to extinguish the flames on An American Fire Zouave ambulance crew demonstrates battlefield removal of wounded soldiers. Photo courtesy Library of Congress INSIDE THE I=IREHOUSE TOM FORSTER Assistant Fire Chief Plumas Eureka Fire Department their burning fellow soldiers. As a reward for their bravery, the Maltese cross worn by the knights was decorated and inscribed by admirers. It came to be known as one of the most honorable badges for a uniform. The legend of the Maltese cross grew as it became associated with the qualities of loyalty, bravery and defender of the weak. Today, firefighters across the country often wear versions of the Maltese cross on their uniforms and apparatus. A related group was known as the Knights Hospitaller, with links to an ancient hospital system. Space limitations here prevent a more detailed description, but those interested can easily find more information on the Internet and in your local library. The involvement of the American fire service in field medical care or transport can be traced far back in American history, including in the Civil War. It was common for volunteer fire fighters of the day to enlist in the armies of the north and south with soldier groups known as Fire Zouaves. For example, the Battle of Gettysburg memorials recognize, among others, the 73rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, or "2nd Fire Zouaves." The monument includes a statue of a firefighter standing next to a soldier, with the motto "Firefighters in Peace, Soldiers in War." While they were not alone in doing so, Fire Zouaves also operated Quincy Fire Department volunteer firefighters inspect the specialized rescue unit used in conjunction with the ambulance. From left: Lloyd Coulter, Ron Logan, Kaley Erickson and Frank Redkey. Photo courtesy Quincy Volunteer Fire Department field ambulances. Prior to 1970, attendants with basic or advanced first aid training, often volunteer firefighters, typically staffed ambulances in America. Sometimes the ambulances were privately owned or operated through hospitals, and sometimes they were staffed by fire departments or specialized rescue squads. Fire departments typically focused on fighting fires, but often provided some limited first aid and rescue services. As urban areas expanded in the industrial revolution, private industry began to operate many medical ambulance services when there was enough volume to make it profitable. Rural and poor areas where the need was less frequent often did so through volunteer fire .departments or specialized rescue squads. In Plumas County, several local fire departments started providing ambulance transport services no later than the 1930s. This included, for example, the Chester, Greenville, Portola and " Quincy volunteer fire departments. Volunteer firefighters, then typically called "firemen," staffed the units when needed. By the 1960s, the experiences of treating wounded soldiers in Korea and Vietnam led researchers to study trauma survival rates, based on emergency care. To their surprise, they found that soldiers who were seriously wounded in Vietnam had a better See Firehouse, page 11B rlstsi:& ' !tOeS to your business! We'll make it simple for you. The Plumas County Visitors Guide is designed locally to entice & invite tourists & visitors to our pristine area. Visitors will look here first & that's how they will find you. You want the business & we've got the perfect product! This colorful publication is the area's premiere guide to picturesque Plumas County. Over 85,000 copies are printed annually and distributed at more than400 locations throughout the Feather River Country and outlying areas. As an ADDED VALUE ... we'll put the entire publication on our web page at plumasnews.com (A large number of our views come from the Sacramento Valley & surrounding areas) tOU] de1 n,l( Look for us at your business soon ~ advertising deadline is Feb. 11, 2015 Your LOCAL newspaper advertising representative is looking forward to workingwith you 283-0800 Sherri, Holly, Marc RgCORD 258-3115 258-3115 832-4646 Val Cheri, Val Roger 00PORTOU IIP01TII lOB Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter depart7 00ents, medical responders have long association Why does your local fire department respond ff you need emergency medical care? Why do they usually come with a fire engine in addition to the ambulance? Ever wonder what an "EMT" is? How about a "first responder"? And what about a "paramedic"? How do our local firefighters fit into these roles in Plumas County? And, perhaps the most important question, why is your local fire department even providing this service? Fire service roots in providing emergency medical aid go very deep, and can be traced at least as far back as the Middle Ages. The Knights of Malta became a charitabl, nonmilitary organization during the llth and 12th centuries, providing aid to the sick and poor and helping to set up numerous hospitals. They would later join the knights of the Crusades in battles to win back the Holy Land. They wore crimson-colored capes over suits of armor. This provided a defense against fire, one of the newest weapons of war. As invading forces attacked a castle, the defenders would throw down containers of naphtha and other flammable liquids. Once the armies were soaked, a torch would be hurled at the attackers, igniting their fuel-soaked clothing. With their fellow troops then on fire, the Knights of Malta would approach on horseback, rip off their capes, and use them to extinguish the flames on An American Fire Zouave ambulance crew demonstrates battlefield removal of wounded soldiers. Photo courtesy Library of Congress INSIDE THE I=IREHOUSE TOM FORSTER Assistant Fire Chief Plumas Eureka Fire Department their burning fellow soldiers. As a reward for their bravery, the Maltese cross worn by the knights was decorated and inscribed by admirers. It came to be known as one of the most honorable badges for a uniform. The legend of the Maltese cross grew as it became associated with the qualities of loyalty, bravery and defender of the weak. Today, firefighters across the country often wear versions of the Maltese cross on their uniforms and apparatus. A related group was known as the Knights Hospitaller, with links to an ancient hospital system. Space limitations here prevent a more detailed description, but those interested can easily find more information on the Internet and in your local library. The involvement of the American fire service in field medical care or transport can be traced far back in American history, including in the Civil War. It was common for volunteer fire fighters of the day to enlist in the armies of the north and south with soldier groups known as Fire Zouaves. For example, the Battle of Gettysburg memorials recognize, among others, the 73rd New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment, or "2nd Fire Zouaves." The monument includes a statue of a firefighter standing next to a soldier, with the motto "Firefighters in Peace, Soldiers in War." While they were not alone in doing so, Fire Zouaves also operated Quincy Fire Department volunteer firefighters inspect the specialized rescue unit used in conjunction with the ambulance. From left: Lloyd Coulter, Ron Logan, Kaley Erickson and Frank Redkey. Photo courtesy Quincy Volunteer Fire Department field ambulances. Prior to 1970, attendants with basic or advanced first aid training, often volunteer firefighters, typically staffed ambulances in America. Sometimes the ambulances were privately owned or operated through hospitals, and sometimes they were staffed by fire departments or specialized rescue squads. Fire departments typically focused on fighting fires, but often provided some limited first aid and rescue services. As urban areas expanded in the industrial revolution, private industry began to operate many medical ambulance services when there was enough volume to make it profitable. Rural and poor areas where the need was less frequent often did so through volunteer fire .departments or specialized rescue squads. In Plumas County, several local fire departments started providing ambulance transport services no later than the 1930s. This included, for example, the Chester, Greenville, Portola and " Quincy volunteer fire departments. Volunteer firefighters, then typically called "firemen," staffed the units when needed. By the 1960s, the experiences of treating wounded soldiers in Korea and Vietnam led researchers to study trauma survival rates, based on emergency care. To their surprise, they found that soldiers who were seriously wounded in Vietnam had a better See Firehouse, page 11B rlstsi:& ' !tOeS to your business! We'll make it simple for you. The Plumas County Visitors Guide is designed locally to entice & invite tourists & visitors to our pristine area. Visitors will look here first & that's how they will find you. You want the business & we've got the perfect product! This colorful publication is the area's premiere guide to picturesque Plumas County. Over 85,000 copies are printed annually and distributed at more than400 locations throughout the Feather River Country and outlying areas. As an ADDED VALUE ... we'll put the entire publication on our web page at plumasnews.com (A large number of our views come from the Sacramento Valley & surrounding areas) tOU] de1 n,l( Look for us at your business soon ~ advertising deadline is Feb. 11, 2015 Your LOCAL newspaper advertising representative is looking forward to workingwith you 283-0800 Sherri, Holly, Marc RgCORD 258-3115 258-3115 832-4646 Val Cheri, Val Roger 00PORTOU IIP01TII