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November 19, 2014     Feather River Bulletin
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2C Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive; Reporter The 12 th Eagle Now that the Feather River College Golden Eagles football season is in the books, it is my turn to say something to the powers that be in our local college athletics program. "Coach, put me in." The Golden Eagles are blessed to have a leader of the caliber and focused professionalism of head coach Bart Andrus and, with that said, the college and the sporting community in Quincy and greater Plumas County need to support him and his vision of football. It's a pretty simple argument, I think, to back Andrus, if he stays on with us, in whatever hewants to do with this team. This is why: How often can a community college of our size say we have a coach who, during his 1996 season at the helm of the squad at Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, was named Coach of the Year by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics? He took the accolade after turning around a flagging program that had not won a game in four years. Thanks to Andrus' leadership, the RMC Bears went 6-4 and had the top-ranked offense in the nation. Oh, and then there is his FROM THE SPORTS DESK GREG KNIGHT Sports Writer sports@plumasnews.com World Bowl XIII ring from 2005 when he led the Amsterdam Admirals to an NFL Europe championship. He also earned an NFLE ring in 2000 as an assistant for the ' Rhein Fire when they beat the Scottish Claymores on a 13-10 final score. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, that is our coach at Feather River College. He is an internationally regarded expert at what he does. He has the resume and the diamond- crusted rings from his time as both head coach and assistant to prove,how good he is. Now that I have gotten the Bart Andrus love-fest out of the way, let me say this to whoever controls the purse strings at the Feather River College athletic department: Please give Bart Andrus whatever he wants. If he needs new equipment, make it so. If that means a turbo charger on his golf cart, please see that it happens. A field house for the team and our visitors would also be pretty grand. I hear it's in the works, but then again I have been hearing that story since the 2003-04 season. Another point, what I think is the biggest plague the Golden Eagles had this season, was the lack of a recruiting class. I say if you give Andrus the off-season support and help he needs to get us a first-class team, with some of the top players from around the country, we will be able to put together a restructured program that is capable of knocking the spit outof teams like American River, Butte and Sacramento City. To those ends, I have to say that being a sports writer and having the soapbox to preach from is a heady tool that I keep stashed deep in the man-cave. It doesn't come out too often, but when it does I intend for it to accomplish a positive outcome. The outcome I want is very positive and not complicated at all: I want Feather River College to dominate in football, like years past. So, I guess I am appointing myself as the 12th Eagle. I will cheer, rant, cajole, support, rally for and pretty much do anything that doesn't involve criminal charges to see that the coaching staff of Golden Eagle football gets what they need to do the one thing that matters in collegiate-level athletics, which is to win. Yes, win. And to those of you that say sports isn't about winning but how you play the game, do me a favor and save that malarkey for Little League and Pop Warner. This is college football. The only thing that matters is winning; it means beating that other guy off the line and having more points on the scoreboard when time elapses. To make my point clear, I'll refer you to a quote from one of my favorite movies, "We Are Marshall." On the day a plane-crash claimed the life of nearly the entire 1970 Marshall University Thundering Herd football team, head coach Rick Tolley was alleged to have told his team that, despite their effort in a 17-14 loss to East Carolina, it just wasn't enough. "There's only one thing people remember and it ain't how we play the game. Winning... is everything." I'll be happy with whatever Andrus wants to do with his team. He is the right coach at the right time and we should back him 110 percent. Now I'm asking Feather River .College to support him equally in whatever he needs. 1 QHS BASKETBALL, from page lC in this year's scheme. "Another great player is Marcus Kingston, a senior who has the heart of a lion," Woodlee added. "He has great energy and flies all over the court. He will literally run through a wall if that was a purposeful objective. His nickname is 'The Missile.'" In preparation for their coming schedule, many of the Trojan basketball players have taken part in off-season workouts; including trips to Chico State University, Central Valley High School and Mesa Verde High School to participate in camps. Squad members also attended a two-week camp held at Feather River College. "Although we went only 7-17-1 throughout our 25 games in the summer, we gained tremendous experience playing against larger competition and performed very well against teams our own size," Woodlee said. "We hope the hard work pays off, but we are facing the injury bug early this year. A few players have been ill and those two combined are allowing some younger players to have some valuable court time." The Trojans' successful football program has also been a semi-thorn in Woodlee's side as he waits for the gridiron gang to wrap up the season. "We are missing four varsity players at this point and it has been difficult to scrimmage versus one another due to the discrepancy in talent, but we should be fundamentally better this year than last," Woodlee added. "We have a unit coming up that has played in my scheme for three years now and it has made for quick learning. We have a good group of basketball players, not just good athletes. Our team probably has seven or eight players in which basketball is their best sport or their true passion. Combined with some high-level IQ kids and it should make for a fun mix." When Woodlee took over the Trojans' program it had gone 4-20 the previous year. Through his turnaround, the team went 15-13 and made the quarterfinals. "We feel the program is headed in the right direction and we are just trying to keep it on course," Woodlee said. "We should have 90 percent of the playbook implemented by our tournament, so we are thinking that if all goes as planned that we should have a decent team this year." Though the Trojans will start the season on the road in Lake Tahoe, they will host their tournament Dec. 4 - 6. Varsity action is set for tip-off at 7:30 p.m. JV tip-off is set for 3 p.m. FRC 13ASKETBALL. from page lC Nwachukwu scored 11 on the day. In the overall numbers picture, FRC players went 23 for 55 from the paint (41.8 percent), though they were dismal from beyond the arc, making only four out of 17 three-point attempts/From the line the Golden Eagles were significantly better, shooting 22 of 39. After the jaunt against was time for trip down the r0ad and a series of games at the Chabot College tournament in Hayward. Mightily, the FRC men lassoed the Los Medanos Mustangs in their first game, beating back the team from the Bay Valley Conference in an 85-58 blowout. The victory saw Tate explode for 32 points as he got as close as any Golden Eagle player to a triple double this season with eight rebounds and four assists. "Jarrell was a major impact player in that game and he was, by far, the most standout player of the night with his athleticism and the ability to make big-time plays for us down the stretch," Rick said Of his freshman starter. Three other FRC players boomed off the boards in double digits as well with Madoshj earning 16, Deshawn Pughsley chiming in at 15 points and Juwan Blakeley adding another 13 on five buckets and a trey from deep outside. From three-point land, Madoshi was on fire and proved you can't make treys if you don't fire them off. Of the 13 attempts made by the freshman, five found their way in from outside the arc. Madoshi also went five of 16 in field goals. Both teams seemed evenly matched in thlow post and key, with FRC shooting 47.7 percent to Los Medanos' 47.9 percent. The real difference between the two teams, however, came from steals by way of seven takeaways by the Golden Eagles and 10 turnovrs by the Mustangs. Tate led Feather Rive defensively with eight rebounds, two steals and a block. Next up for Feather River was a heartbreaker of a game to tournament host Chabot as the Golden Eagles dipped out on a 95-88 loss to the Gladiators. Outscored in both halves of the game, Rick said a lack of attention to detail cost FRC the game. "(We) gave the game away making costly mistakes on defense (and) allowing known shooters to hit big shots down the stretch, which proved to be fatal," Rick wrote in a social media posting about the game. And then it was on to West Valley and a 5-1 overall start on the season for the Golden Eagles as they trounced the Vikings, 77-65. The win also gave FRC a 2-1 record at the Chabot tournament. Even at this early stage in the season, FRC is showing up in the stat book of teams in California by way of a fifth-place ranking in steals per game with 12.4. College of theRedwoods is ranked No. 1 at only a slightly better 18 steals. We're asking each of you to spend at least $100 of your holiday shopping budget, right here in Plumas County. Why? If each of our readers* spent $100 in Plumas County it would put $1,853,000 back into our local economy. We would be keeping our money here...right here in our own community. We can do this even with simple things like getting our cars serviced or our hair done before we travel. *Based on an average of two readers per newspaper. Help your community prosper by shopping locally. If you do, we will all be helping each other. Isn't that what the holidays are all about? FEATHER PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. Feather River Bulletin Portola Reporter Indian Valley Record Chester Progressive Two Local Technicians Copiers & Fax Machines Laser Printers New or Refurbished SHARR FROM SHARP MINDS COME SHARP PRODUCTS TM (888) 447-2679 - (530) 284-1112 Fax: (530) 284-1102 101 Pine St., Greenville Serving Plumas, Lassen, Sierra & Modoc Counties Laurence McClish, M.D. Orthopedic stem cell therapy uses your own stem cells, injecting them back into your arthritic joints, potentially reducing inflammation & pain. Metabolic Medicine also entails weight reduction and memory enhancement. 775,348-8100 Sierra Metabolic and Cellular Medicine 605 Sierra Rose #4, Reno Laurence McClish MD, AAOS, MS in metabolic and nutritional medicine 2C Wednesday, Nov. 19, 2014 Bulletin, Record, Progressive; Reporter The 12 th Eagle Now that the Feather River College Golden Eagles football season is in the books, it is my turn to say something to the powers that be in our local college athletics program. "Coach, put me in." The Golden Eagles are blessed to have a leader of the caliber and focused professionalism of head coach Bart Andrus and, with that said, the college and the sporting community in Quincy and greater Plumas County need to support him and his vision of football. It's a pretty simple argument, I think, to back Andrus, if he stays on with us, in whatever hewants to do with this team. This is why: How often can a community college of our size say we have a coach who, during his 1996 season at the helm of the squad at Rocky Mountain College in Billings, Montana, was named Coach of the Year by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics? He took the accolade after turning around a flagging program that had not won a game in four years. Thanks to Andrus' leadership, the RMC Bears went 6-4 and had the top-ranked offense in the nation. Oh, and then there is his FROM THE SPORTS DESK GREG KNIGHT Sports Writer sports@plumasnews.com World Bowl XIII ring from 2005 when he led the Amsterdam Admirals to an NFL Europe championship. He also earned an NFLE ring in 2000 as an assistant for the ' Rhein Fire when they beat the Scottish Claymores on a 13-10 final score. Yes, ladies and gentlemen, that is our coach at Feather River College. He is an internationally regarded expert at what he does. He has the resume and the diamond- crusted rings from his time as both head coach and assistant to prove,how good he is. Now that I have gotten the Bart Andrus love-fest out of the way, let me say this to whoever controls the purse strings at the Feather River College athletic department: Please give Bart Andrus whatever he wants. If he needs new equipment, make it so. If that means a turbo charger on his golf cart, please see that it happens. A field house for the team and our visitors would also be pretty grand. I hear it's in the works, but then again I have been hearing that story since the 2003-04 season. Another point, what I think is the biggest plague the Golden Eagles had this season, was the lack of a recruiting class. I say if you give Andrus the off-season support and help he needs to get us a first-class team, with some of the top players from around the country, we will be able to put together a restructured program that is capable of knocking the spit outof teams like American River, Butte and Sacramento City. To those ends, I have to say that being a sports writer and having the soapbox to preach from is a heady tool that I keep stashed deep in the man-cave. It doesn't come out too often, but when it does I intend for it to accomplish a positive outcome. The outcome I want is very positive and not complicated at all: I want Feather River College to dominate in football, like years past. So, I guess I am appointing myself as the 12th Eagle. I will cheer, rant, cajole, support, rally for and pretty much do anything that doesn't involve criminal charges to see that the coaching staff of Golden Eagle football gets what they need to do the one thing that matters in collegiate-level athletics, which is to win. Yes, win. And to those of you that say sports isn't about winning but how you play the game, do me a favor and save that malarkey for Little League and Pop Warner. This is college football. The only thing that matters is winning; it means beating that other guy off the line and having more points on the scoreboard when time elapses. To make my point clear, I'll refer you to a quote from one of my favorite movies, "We Are Marshall." On the day a plane-crash claimed the life of nearly the entire 1970 Marshall University Thundering Herd football team, head coach Rick Tolley was alleged to have told his team that, despite their effort in a 17-14 loss to East Carolina, it just wasn't enough. "There's only one thing people remember and it ain't how we play the game. Winning... is everything." I'll be happy with whatever Andrus wants to do with his team. He is the right coach at the right time and we should back him 110 percent. Now I'm asking Feather River .College to support him equally in whatever he needs. 1 QHS BASKETBALL, from page lC in this year's scheme. "Another great player is Marcus Kingston, a senior who has the heart of a lion," Woodlee added. "He has great energy and flies all over the court. He will literally run through a wall if that was a purposeful objective. His nickname is 'The Missile.'" In preparation for their coming schedule, many of the Trojan basketball players have taken part in off-season workouts; including trips to Chico State University, Central Valley High School and Mesa Verde High School to participate in camps. Squad members also attended a two-week camp held at Feather River College. "Although we went only 7-17-1 throughout our 25 games in the summer, we gained tremendous experience playing against larger competition and performed very well against teams our own size," Woodlee said. "We hope the hard work pays off, but we are facing the injury bug early this year. A few players have been ill and those two combined are allowing some younger players to have some valuable court time." The Trojans' successful football program has also been a semi-thorn in Woodlee's side as he waits for the gridiron gang to wrap up the season. "We are missing four varsity players at this point and it has been difficult to scrimmage versus one another due to the discrepancy in talent, but we should be fundamentally better this year than last," Woodlee added. "We have a unit coming up that has played in my scheme for three years now and it has made for quick learning. We have a good group of basketball players, not just good athletes. Our team probably has seven or eight players in which basketball is their best sport or their true passion. Combined with some high-level IQ kids and it should make for a fun mix." When Woodlee took over the Trojans' program it had gone 4-20 the previous year. Through his turnaround, the team went 15-13 and made the quarterfinals. "We feel the program is headed in the right direction and we are just trying to keep it on course," Woodlee said. "We should have 90 percent of the playbook implemented by our tournament, so we are thinking that if all goes as planned that we should have a decent team this year." Though the Trojans will start the season on the road in Lake Tahoe, they will host their tournament Dec. 4 - 6. Varsity action is set for tip-off at 7:30 p.m. JV tip-off is set for 3 p.m. FRC 13ASKETBALL. from page lC Nwachukwu scored 11 on the day. In the overall numbers picture, FRC players went 23 for 55 from the paint (41.8 percent), though they were dismal from beyond the arc, making only four out of 17 three-point attempts/From the line the Golden Eagles were significantly better, shooting 22 of 39. After the jaunt against was time for trip down the r0ad and a series of games at the Chabot College tournament in Hayward. Mightily, the FRC men lassoed the Los Medanos Mustangs in their first game, beating back the team from the Bay Valley Conference in an 85-58 blowout. The victory saw Tate explode for 32 points as he got as close as any Golden Eagle player to a triple double this season with eight rebounds and four assists. "Jarrell was a major impact player in that game and he was, by far, the most standout player of the night with his athleticism and the ability to make big-time plays for us down the stretch," Rick said Of his freshman starter. Three other FRC players boomed off the boards in double digits as well with Madoshj earning 16, Deshawn Pughsley chiming in at 15 points and Juwan Blakeley adding another 13 on five buckets and a trey from deep outside. From three-point land, Madoshi was on fire and proved you can't make treys if you don't fire them off. Of the 13 attempts made by the freshman, five found their way in from outside the arc. Madoshi also went five of 16 in field goals. Both teams seemed evenly matched in thlow post and key, with FRC shooting 47.7 percent to Los Medanos' 47.9 percent. The real difference between the two teams, however, came from steals by way of seven takeaways by the Golden Eagles and 10 turnovrs by the Mustangs. Tate led Feather Rive defensively with eight rebounds, two steals and a block. Next up for Feather River was a heartbreaker of a game to tournament host Chabot as the Golden Eagles dipped out on a 95-88 loss to the Gladiators. Outscored in both halves of the game, Rick said a lack of attention to detail cost FRC the game. "(We) gave the game away making costly mistakes on defense (and) allowing known shooters to hit big shots down the stretch, which proved to be fatal," Rick wrote in a social media posting about the game. And then it was on to West Valley and a 5-1 overall start on the season for the Golden Eagles as they trounced the Vikings, 77-65. The win also gave FRC a 2-1 record at the Chabot tournament. Even at this early stage in the season, FRC is showing up in the stat book of teams in California by way of a fifth-place ranking in steals per game with 12.4. College of theRedwoods is ranked No. 1 at only a slightly better 18 steals. We're asking each of you to spend at least $100 of your holiday shopping budget, right here in Plumas County. Why? If each of our readers* spent $100 in Plumas County it would put $1,853,000 back into our local economy. We would be keeping our money here...right here in our own community. We can do this even with simple things like getting our cars serviced or our hair done before we travel. *Based on an average of two readers per newspaper. Help your community prosper by shopping locally. If you do, we will all be helping each other. Isn't that what the holidays are all about? FEATHER PUBLISHING COMPANY, INC. Feather River Bulletin Portola Reporter Indian Valley Record Chester Progressive Two Local Technicians Copiers & Fax Machines Laser Printers New or Refurbished SHARR FROM SHARP MINDS COME SHARP PRODUCTS TM (888) 447-2679 - (530) 284-1112 Fax: (530) 284-1102 101 Pine St., Greenville Serving Plumas, Lassen, Sierra & Modoc Counties Laurence McClish, M.D. Orthopedic stem cell therapy uses your own stem cells, injecting them back into your arthritic joints, potentially reducing inflammation & pain. Metabolic Medicine also entails weight reduction and memory enhancement. 775,348-8100 Sierra Metabolic and Cellular Medicine 605 Sierra Rose #4, Reno Laurence McClish MD, AAOS, MS in metabolic and nutritional medicine