Newspaper Archive of
Feather River Bulletin
Quincy, California
Lyft
December 19, 2012     Feather River Bulletin
PAGE 26     (26 of 34 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 26     (26 of 34 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
December 19, 2012
 

Newspaper Archive of Feather River Bulletin produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2019. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




1OB Wednesday, Dec.-19, 2012 Bulletin, Record, Progressive, Reporter Events Around Plumas County Wed, Dec. 19 Chester: Annual winter holiday concert, 7 p.m., Chester Elementary School auditorium. CES, Chester High School music groups directed by Jane Brown. Features traditional holiday music from around the world. Free; donations accepted. Greenville: Winter Concert, 7 p.m., Greenville High School cafeteria. Featuring school bands, Indian Valley Academy choir. Quincy: Quincy Junior-Senior High School winter concert, 6 p.m., QHS small gym. Featuring music from junior high band, high school concert band, jazz band, choir. Suggested donation $5; any family donating $10 or more may enter drawing for opportunity to conduct the band. ThUo Dec. 20 Greenville: Holiday Program, 6 p.m., Indian Valley Elementary cafeteria. Quincy: Elementary band and choir performance, 1:30 p.m., Pioneer-Quincy Elementary School cafeteria. Fri, Dec. 21 Blairsden: Winemaker's Dinner, 6:30 p.m., Grizzly Grill. Trevor Bartlett of Indian Peak Vineyards pairs different wine with each course of four-course meal. Reservations recommended: 836-1300. Portola: Words & Music, 7 p.m., Williams House. Featuring Andrew Ohren. Sign up for open mic at the aoor. Admission $3. For information: 283-3402. Quincy: Winter Solstice Celebration, 5:30 - 7 p.m., Yoga and Wellness Center at 1690 E. Main St. Mark the longest night of the year with music, ritual, yoga, meditation, light refreshments. Donation-based: participants will choose local nonprofit to receive donations. For information: quincyyogawellness.com. To RSVP: Jane Steidel, janeyoga50@digitalpath.net. Sat, Dec. 22 Quincy: Holiday music from Johny McDonald and friends, noon, Quincy Natural Foods Cooperative. Sat - Sun, Dec. 22 - 23 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (approximate end time), meet at Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Route, distance varies depending on group ability, fitness. Snowshoes are provided for $1 suggested donation, or bring your own. Reservations required for private group tours only; call 595-6132. For information: 595-4480, nps.gov/lavo. t Sat - Sun, Dec. 29'- 30 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (aproximate end time), meet at Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Route, distance varies depending on group abili, fitness. Snowshoes are provided for $1 suggested donation, or bring your own. Reservations required for private group tours only; call 595-6132. For information: 595-4480, nps.gov/lavo. Monday, Dec. 31 Genesee: New Year's Fireworks and Open House, 6:30 - 9 p.m., Genesee Store. Purchased beverages come with complimen- tary appetizers. For information: 284-6351. Tuesday, Jan. 1 Calpine: Elks New Year's Day brunch, 9 a,m. ,,oon, Calpine Elks Lodge at 71292 Highway 70 (three miles west of Portola). Breakfast consists of pancakes, scrambled eggs, sausage, ham, country potatoes, biscuits and gravy, fruit bowl, orange juice, milk, coffee. $10; kids under 6 free. For information: Kathryn, 832-0951. Fri - Sat Jan. 4 - 5 Quincy: An Evening of One-Acts; 7 - 10 p.m., West End Theatre at 541 Main St. Dramaworks presents two one-act plays: "Black Comedy" and "Dinner for One." For information: Edie O'Connor, 283-1956. Sat - Sun, Jan. 5 - 6 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (approximate end time), meet at Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Route, distance varies depending on group ability, fitness. Snowshoes are provided for $1 suggested donation, or bring your own. Reservations required for private group tours only; call 595-6132. For information: 595-4480, nps.gov/lavo. Sat - Sun, Jan. 12 - 13 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Ranger-led snowshoe walks, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (approximate end time), meet at Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Special program Sat commemorates National Winter Trails Day. Route, distance varies depending on group ability, fitness. Snowshoes are provided for $1 'suggested donation, or bring your own. Reservations required for private group tours only; call 595-6132. For information: 595-4480, nps.gov/lavo. Sat, Jan. 19 Clio: Trailfest, doors open 5:30 p.m., Nakoma Golf Resort. Sierra Buttes Trail Stewardship group hosts 10th anniversary celebration with live music, catered dinner, auction, presentations. Tickets $35, all proceeds support SBTS. For information, tickets: sierratrails.org. Lake Almanor: Peninsula Firemen's Association annual crab feed; 5 p.m. social, 6 p.m. dinner; Station No. 2 at 801 Golf Club Road. $35 per person. Tickets available at Station No. 2. For information: 259-2306. Sat - Sun, Jan. 19 - 20 Lassen Volcanic National Park: Lassen Film Festival, 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center auditorium. Films highlight park, outdoor recreation. Lunch available at Lassen Care. For information: 595-4480. Ranger-led snowshoe walks, 1:30 - 3:30 p.m. (approximate end time), meet at Kohm Yah-mah-nee Visitor Center. Route, distance varies depending on group ability, fitness. Snowshoes are provided for $1 suggested donation, or bring your own. Reservations required for private group tours only; call 595-6132. For information: 595-4480, nps.gov/lavo. Sun, Jan. 20 Johnsville: Longboard Revival Races, 10:30 a.m., Plumas-Eureka Ski Bowl. Racers must wear 1860s clothes (no synthetic materials), use original "dope" on skis. For information: Chris Murray, 283-4444; plumasskiclub.org. **To include free or nonprofit, fundraising, educational or charity events in" this calendar, email iburke@plumasnews.com or call Ingrid Burke at 283-0800. For sporting events, including charity golf tournaments, call James Wilson at 283-0800 or email sports@plumasnews.com. We will publish the name of the event, location, date, time and a phone number, as space permits. F m m ma f/m//IJ m m mm m m mm rams m mmm m lira MII/J m m m ii SENIOI:L 1VIEIL.T orange/spinach salad, whole Nutrition sites: II Mo---ay, 2-4 r grain roll, red & green Chester, 394-7636; I grapes Quincy, 283-0643; Sites Closed. Christmas Holiday I Tuesday, Dec, 25 I Sites Closed. Christmas Holiday I Wednesday, Dec. 26 I Healthy heart meal: salmon loaf, tomato/basil couscous, II. maim m roll m m Ill Greenville, 284-6608 (call day | Thursday, Dec. 27 before for reservation); Beef stroganoff, noodles, Portola, 832-4173 (call day I coleslaw, beets, whole grain before for reservation); bread, sliced oranges Blairsden, 836-0446 I Friday, Dec. 28 (Wednesdays only). Pizza, dinner salad, steamed Suggested donation is $2.50. I swiss chard, mixed fruit cup One guest may accompany. each senior, $6 mandatory I Menus subject to change, charge. Nil mini mmm l l II l maim Nil Nil ill Ill Ill .ll Chuck Norris offers top holiday tips for staying trim Q: Mr. Norris, sometimes I think the easiest way to stay fit through the holidays would be to leave the U,S. What do you do to overcome the yuletide yummy wars? --Dan S. Maine A: Researchers who ques- tioned 2,000 Britons on their holiday travel and diet dis- covered that the following were the top seven destina- tions for weight gain over a two-week period. Those: 7 -- Visiting Spain, Portu- gal and Africa gained an av- erage of 6 pounds. 6 -- Staying home for the holidays (in Britain) gained an average of 6.8 pounds. 5 -- Visiting Greece, with its tavernas and authentic Greek cuisine, gained an av- erage of 6.9 pounds. 4 -- Visiting Italy, with its wine, cheese and pastas, gained an average of 7 pounds. 3 --Visiting France, with its wine, cheese and breads, gained an average of 7.3 pounds. 2 -- Visiting the Caribbean, with its all-inclusive resorts, gained an average 7.4 pounds. 1 -- Visiting America, with its enormous portions, all- you-can-eat buffets and serial snacking, gained an average of 8 pounds. I'm sure this study surpris- es few in the U.S. From Thanksgiving through New Year's, America becomes a minefield of munchies. Whether you're visit ing our great country or a citizen of it, here are my top seven tips for navigating around our culture of calories at any holiday food festivity, espe- cially those oft-invited Christmas parties: --When you enter a party and are offered a drink, start with water, not an alcohol drink, since alcohol can be all appetite stimulant. Drinking a bottle of water before you eat will not only replenish your body with the H20 it needs, but also fills your stomach, makes you less hungry and will even help you lose weight, according to scientists from Virginia Tech reporting in the journal Obesity. --If you can win the tempta- tion round at the hors d'oeuvre table, you're well on your way to consumption vic- tory. So fight there to fill your small plate with healthy appe- tizers, like vegetables --: car- rots, edamame, cherry toma: toes, cauliflower, broccoli or celery with a little organic peanut butter. If there are chip-and-dip alternatives, i C-FOR.CE HEALTH AND FITNESS CHUCK NORRIS info@creators.com grab a handful of whole-wheat pita rounds or other low-oil chips. Spread some hummus, salsa or black bean dips on your plate instead of queso, ranch or refried beans. --When the main meal line opens up, never be among the first through the line. And if you have main-meal plate- size options, always grab the smallest (even consider car- rying over your hors d'oeuvre plate to the buffet line). Size matters! The small- er the space on the plate, the less the temptation to fill it with Christmas cuisines high in saturated fats and refined sugars. --Despite the size of your main meal plate, fill as much space with a leafy salad (a let- tuce mix or spinach is always best). That way, you're less tempted to pack more four- cheese lasagna on your plate! Limit the croutons, bacon bits and fatty dressings like ranch and blue cheese, and opt for a slight sprinkle of vinaigrette. And, of course, nab as many fresh veggies and beans (black, red or pin- to) as you can, in and out of salads. As far as other main foods, you know what to do: Avoid fried, choose foods with the fewest and freshest ingredi- ents, opt for the leanest of meats and if fish is an option, grab it every time. (Remem- ber, fish is a great source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids, particularly in salmon. Eating fish twice weekly, es- pecially if substituted for oth- er meats, can reduce blood clotting and inflammation of the arteries.) --Though it takes a little multitasking at a party, try to consciously chew your food twice as long as you normally would. As those in many Eu- ropean countries do, focus on enjoying the taste more than filling your stomach. Masaaki Eto, a professor of clinical pharmacology and medicine at Ohu University in Koriyama, Japan, reported to delegates at the European Association for the Study of Diabetes' 47th annual meet- ing how recent research re- vealed that extensive chew- ing fuels the release of two in- testinal peptides that reduced appetite and food consump- tion in those who are obese. --Whether you're watching a sporting event or gabbing with guests, the longer you can extend eating your main meal, the more time you're going to give to other guests to waffle down the desserts (the King Kong of holiday obesity). Slaying the after- dinner sugar giant is not easy (even for me!), but you'll have a better chance if your mind is preoccupied with other things. If you must dessert, then look on the snack spreads for fruit salads, yogurts or dark chocolate -- a single serving (piece) can satiate sugar cravings if savored and swal- lowed slowly. And remem- ber, the California Academy of the Sciences reported that dark chocolate has high lev- els of stearic acid, which does not raise bad cholesterol, and oleic acid, which may raise good cholesterol levels. --Lastly, consider only drinking water or coffee after dinner. Pass up the eggnog, and you'll spare yourself hundreds of additional calo- ries. As the University of Rochester documented, a 12- ounce can of regular beer contains 140 to 200 calories, a light beer 100 or more calo- ries, a 4-ounce glass of wine 62 to 160 calories and a single shot of liquor (1.5 ounces) anywhere from 115 to 200 calories. And one cup of eggnog has 343 calories! It takes 2,100 continual jumping jacks to burn off 8 ounces of eggnog! As a bonus holiday health tip, remember that the more you stand over the holidays, the better off you'll be. The journal of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise reported that scientists from the Pen- nington Biomedical Research Center -- the nation's leading obesity research center-- proved that prolonged sitting increases the risks of heart disease and heart attack. On the other hand, standing aids digestion (with sugar and fat metabolism) and burns 60 more calories an hour com- pared to sitting. Beyond all these things, keep in mind the health fact that I like to remind my wife, Gena, about every holiday sea- son: According to Harvard Health Publications, watching football burns an additional 70 calories an hour! Write to Chuck Norris (info@creators.com) with ques- tions about health and fitness. Copyright 2012 Chuck Norris Distributed by creators.com License plates show support Many know about person- alized license plates (vanity plates), but for anyone who wanted to show ,their support for our troops, there was some confusion in the past when it came to the veteran license plates. I'd reported in an earlier article that you didn't have to be a veteran to own one, but the wording on the license plate itself seemed misleading. So, after some negotiation and revision with the DMV and state, it is clearer now for anyone who wants to show their appreciation for our na- tion's veterans. Here's some information passed down from headquarters at the Cal- ifornia Department of Veter- ans Affairs: Veterans Day has passed, but there is a way to acknowl- edge the incredible service and sacrifice of California's nearly 2 million veterans all year long: purchase an "Hon- oring Veterans" license plate. These "Honoring Veter- ans" license plates are now VET TRAX MIKE McLEOD Division Director, Veterans Services available to all California mo- torists. They can be cus- tomized with the distinctive military branch or veterans service organization logo of choice. Proceeds help support efforts of the California De- partment of Veterans Affairs and county veteran service offices to connect veterans and families with the benefits they've earned. Those veteran benefits do many things including: --Help veterans and their families successfully transi- tion from military life to civilian life. --Bring hundreds of millions of dollars into California every year. --Lower the local cost of vet- eran health care. --Reduce veteran homeless- ness and unemployment numbers. --Increase veteran enroll- ment in California colleges and universities. Show your pride; show your support; give a gift with real meaning. Purchase a vet- eran license plate today! Se- quential veteran license plates are $30 a year (in addi- tion to regular DMV fees) if purchased by the end of tile year. The price for these plates goes up to $50 after Jan. 1, 2013. For an additional one-time $10 fee, personalized "vanity" plates can be or- dered. To purchase your veteran license plate, go to cacv- so.org. Click on "Veteran Li- cense Plates" to view avail- able logos. Then, go to dmv.ca.gov. Click on "Vehi- cle Registration," click on "License Plates," then click on "California Special Inter- est License Plates." Call this office if you have any ques- tions: 283-6275. Public invited to The Plumas Count Special District Association invites all interested individuals to attend its last executive board meeting of 2012. Members will meet next Friday, Dec. 28, at 10 a.m. at the Courthouse Care located across from the Plumas County Courthouse in Quincy. Among the topics to be discussed will be nomina- tions and election of special districts' meeting directors to serve on the board, contract training with the California Rural Water Association and goals for 2013. Members encour- age public participation and welcome input.